Take the 2-minute tour ×
German Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of German wanting to discuss the finer points of the language and translation. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know how to deal with writing texts, where a noun (or a collection of them), should be repetitively written and no synonym helps. Since the question I actually want to ask would be too broad, let me, instead, focus on the following two points:

1. The former and the latter

Is there in German, something that resembles these English words used for pairs of items?

He learns two of the most difficult languages: Mandarin and Hungarian. While in the former he clearly shows proficiency, for the latter he couldn't even get an A1 (if such an exam exists).

I'd try to translate this as:

Er lernt zwei der schwierigsten Sprachen, und zwar Mandarin und Ungarisch. Selbst wenn er schon die erste deutlich beherrscht, für die letzte könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen.

First, I'm not sure if it is right (mostly because I'm not sure which genus should be preferred over which to build the relative clausule: das Mandarin Vs. die Sprache). But if it is right, I'm sure it's not the optimal way to express it.

Question: How to evoke two items we already referred to, in a very educated way (gehoben)?

2. Avoiding demonstrative pronouns

On the same story on this guy interested in hard languages:

Selbst wenn er schon die erste deutlich beherrscht, für die letzte könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen. Die ist echt schwierig.

Here, die sounds to me not so gehoben for, say, a serious text. I've found selbiger to substitute nouns previously mentioned, which I'd use as:

Selbst wenn er schon das erste/zweite deutlich beherrscht, für das letzte könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen. Selbige ist echt schwierig.

Frage: Kann man das in Fettschriften so behaupten? Was wäre hier am passendsten?

share|improve this question
1  
Allen ernstes: ich würde die Namen der Sprachen hier wiederholen. Es macht die Sätze leichter verständlich. Wenn Du das nicht willst, kannst Du einen Einschub machen: Er lernt zwei der schwierigsten Sprachen, Mandarin (was er schon recht gut beherrscht) und Ungarisch (wofür er noch nicht einmal die A1-Prüfung schaffen würde). –  Robert Jan 31 at 16:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1. The former and the latter

Clearly: ersteres und letzteres.

He learns two of the most difficult languages: Mandarin and Hungarian. While in the former he clearly shows proficiency, for the latter he couldn't even get an A1 (if such an exam exists).

Er lernt zwei der schwierigsten Sprachen, und zwar Mandarin und Ungarisch. Selbst wenn er erstere schon deutlich beherrscht, für letztere könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen.

2. Avoiding demonstrative pronouns

I believe a simple personal pronoun would serve well here:

Selbst wenn er erstere schon deutlich beherrscht, für letztere könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen. Sie ist echt schwierig.

share|improve this answer

i would propose using

"Diese ist nämlich sehr schwer."

or

"Diese ist echt schwierig."

"Die ist echt schwer." sounds unprofessional.. "Selbige" is ok.

And maybe you should not use

"[...] beherrscht, für die letzte könnte [...]"

i think

"[...] beherrscht, für die zweite könnte [...]"

is a bit better. Though "letzte" is not wrong at all.

share|improve this answer

Question 1

Er lernt zwei der schwierigsten Sprachen, und zwar Mandarin und Ungarisch. Selbst wenn er schon die erste deutlich beherrscht, für die letzte könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung ablegen.

The genus should refer to "die Sprache" over "das Mandarin", as "erste" and "letztere" refer to the two languages Mandarin and Chinese.

The use of "selbst wenn" in this sentence is a bit misleading, the English equivalent would be something along the lines of "Even if he would already speak the former fluently" a better translation would be:

Obwohl er die erste bereits deutlich beherrscht [...]

or even better

Waehrend er die erste bereits gut beherrscht, koennte er fuer die zweite nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung bestehen.

I swapped "ablegen" with "bestehen" as the former does not neccesarily imply a succesful exam, but rather simple participation. I also don't think that a native speaker would say "deutlich beherrscht", but for example "gut beherrscht" - "deutlich" rather means "clear", "precise", or "distinct". As in "ein deutlicher Unterschied" - "a clear difference".

Question 2

Selbige ist echt schwierig.

The problem here is that it remains unclear what you refer to - the A1 examn or the language again? My suggestion would be to combine the statements as follows:

Waehrend er die erste bereits gut beherrscht, ist die zweite so schwierig, dass er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung bestehen wuerde.

Here, you avoid the potential ambiguity, and I don't think the sentence is overly long.

share|improve this answer

Technically, die erste and die letzte are fine. You can also use erstere and letztere, which imho is more idiomatic.

You can replace those with die eine and die andere, respectively, but then it's not sure if the first mentioned word is referred to by eine. Another alternative is erstgenannte and letzgenannte.
Andere is especially used when referring to more items:

Die erstgenannte beherrscht er, alle anderen kann er nicht so gut.


About die versus diese: there have been a few question here in the past one of which were asked by you. I understand that this is a little complicated as the German concept is way different to the concepts in Spanish and English.
I'd say using die is not only fine but your best choice. However, it is possible to use all diese, die and even jene there, although the latter one ("letztere") is very unidiomatic.

I'd write it like that:

Er lernt zwei der schwierigsten Sprachen überhaupt: Mandarin und Ungarisch. Auch wenn er die erste[=erstere] wirklich gut beherrscht, für die andere[=letztere] könnte er nicht einmal eine A1-Prüfung bestehen. Die kann er nämlich absolut nicht gut.

share|improve this answer
    
I find the last example to be problematic. We are using the pointer "die andere/letztere" to refer to "Sprache". Then there comes a new female noun "die Prüfung" and the next sentence starts with a quite distinguished first position demonstrative pronoun. Sure, it is not "diese" and yet, the "die" gravitates toward "die Prüfung" quite strongly, especially with the "nämlich" in there. Also, it would be repetitive to refer to the same item twice using the same word ("die"). –  Emanuel Jan 31 at 19:32
    
Indeed, I did asked once something about the importance of emphasizing "die, das, der", and maybe other question, which, I'm sure, wasn't related with avoiding der, die, das to find something better. If you refere to this question, it wasn't me :). In either case, your remark is off-topic. –  c.p. Feb 2 at 9:44

You can express it with dies und jenes also.

Er lernt die sehr schwierigen Sprachen Mandarin und Ungarisch. Während er jenes bereits gut beherrscht, könnte er für dieses kaum die leichteste Prüfung bestehen.

Die Besiedlung durch Kelten und Alemannen ist belegt. Während diese jene bereits in grauer Vorzeit verdrängt hatten, wurden sie später selber von den Römern nach Norden gedrängt und kehrten erst zurück, nachdem der Limes gefallen war.

share|improve this answer
    
"Dieses" und "jenes" finde ich bei den Sprachen unpassend. Wenn ich nicht wüsste, worum es gehen sollte, würde ich den Satz auch nach dem dritten Mal lesen nicht verstehen. –  Robert Jan 31 at 16:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.