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I want to say my german course will be in 7 July to end. Can I use beenden for these purpose?

Mein Deutschkurs wird am 7. July beenden.

If not, what would be the correct verb for this means?

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If you'd like to keep this structure, you either take "enden" as suggested by christian.s or you say "wird ... beendet sein" (will be finished). –  Em1 Jun 4 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

"beenden" needs a subject and an object..

You would say

Mein Deutschkurs endet am 7. Juli.

Mein Deutschkurs wird am 7. Juli enden.

if you want to say that there are no further meetings of this course, so it literally ends.

You would say

Ich beende meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli.

Ich werde meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli beenden.

to either say that you graduate or that you abort it.

And you would say

Ich breche meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli ab.

Ich werde meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli abbrechen.

to clearify that you will abort it.

On the other hand, to clearify that you will graduate, you would say

Ich schließe meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli ab.

Ich werde meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli abschließen.

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... and "Ich werde meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli abschließen to similarly clarify, that you will graduate. –  zwiebel Jun 4 at 17:59
    
@zwiebel included it, thank you –  christian.s Jun 5 at 6:36
    
Except that nobody actually uses the synthetic future tenses, especially when a specific date or time is provided. (They shouldn’t be taught in DAF courses at all.) Therefore, Ich beende meinen Deutschkurs am 7. Juli or Mein Deutschkurs endet am 7. Juli – or what @zwiebel said in their answer. –  Crissov Jun 5 at 9:58
    
@Crissov you should be careful with nobody/everybody, but you are right - I will provide the "common" forms, too. Thank you! –  christian.s Jun 5 at 10:02

The above answers, especially christian.s's are actually a sort of German you would use in letters or e-mails of a more formal character. They are perfectly correct.

For a more colloquial variety, such as people would actually use in spoken German as opposed to more formal written German, consider

Mein Deutschkurs geht noch bis zum 7. Juli.

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That's an important supplement, although I'd use dauert. –  Grantwalzer Sep 6 at 5:55
    
That sounds rather formal, doesn't it? –  zwiebel Sep 6 at 15:30
    
Not at all. It's just not as informal as geht. –  Grantwalzer Sep 6 at 17:26
    
Well admittedly that's what I meant: formal as compared to geht. At least in my generation I would assume a 95/5 usage distribution for geht/dauert. –  zwiebel Sep 7 at 14:19

Mein Deutschkurs wird am 7. Juli zu Ende sein.

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It'd be cool if you could elaborate (edit) your answer a bit. As it stands now it is a bit lean... –  Takkat Jun 4 at 13:32

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