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If I wanted to say "I look bad like you"

Ich mich schlecht aussehen, wie dich.

I don't know if it's correct, but my doubt is what's the purpose of mich in this situation?

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2  
Um... The German sentence is, well, terrible. – Actually, the English one isn't that good, too, is it? –  Em1 Jun 4 at 21:00
    
Where did you get the "mich" from... Google translate? Don't use it. It's not up to the task. –  Emanuel Jun 4 at 21:33
2  
"Look bad" as in, "being ugly" or "leaving a bad impression"? –  Raphael Jun 4 at 23:30
    
The German sentence is expected to be bad. But, sorry, mate, the English sentence is simple but that was the point and I don't agree that's not that good, it's just plain. @Raphael I meant to say leaving a bad impression. –  kaneda Jun 5 at 1:17
    
@Emanuel I'm a very beginner student of the German language. It didn't came out from the Google Translator, which is really terrible. But I sometimes use it as quick dictionary. It's a mix from my humble knowledge and dictionary. –  kaneda Jun 5 at 1:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

English:

I look as bad as you.   /    I look bad like you.

German:

Ich sehe so schlecht aus wie du.

"Mich" has no purpose. Translated back: I me bad look, like you. (Nope)

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No matter where you got it, or what your level of German is

Ich mich schlecht aussehen, wie dich.

is horrible, like Em1 says. First thing you should know, for any language, is that you have to conjugate a verb, you can't just put the infinitive in the sentence. That becomes "ich sehe aus". Aussehen is not a transitive verb, i.e. it's not like you would "aussehen" something or somebody. "Ich sehe schlecht aus" has a meaning in itself, you don't have to refer it to yourself, so the "mich" is completely unnecessary. And then the "dich" shouldn't be in the accusative either, it should be nominative: "wie du".
And finally the comparative: you can compare how bad you look to how bad the other person looks by using the word "so...wie", and then you get the translation Carlster gave:

Ich sehe so schlecht aus wie du.

But IMO there's another possibility:

Ich sehe schlecht aus, wie du.

That would mean "I look bad, just like you".

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