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I have a few questions about German or Deutsch.

  1. What is the difference between "Bin Ich" and "Ich bin". It's really been bugging me and I couldn't find anything about it. I also looked at the sentences and Bin Ich wasn't a question.

  2. Just clarifying, if you put the verb before the pronoun it is like you are asking a question for example: "Haben Sie einen Kuchen?" -- would translate to "Do you have a cake?"

  3. Which form of the noun do you use when there is a mix of that occupation. Like there are 2 boy students and 2 girl students and you just want to group them together. Do you just say " Die Schüler ".

  4. What do you say when you don't know the gender of a person ( not to be rude ) or a thing do you just put it in the masculine form kind of like we do in English?

  5. German word order is like Time, Manner, Place if so could this be translated the same as the second one "Erik kommt heute mit der Bahn nach Hause." "Heute kommt Erik mit der Bahn nach Hause."

  6. The noun only changes form while in the Genitive form and it gets an -e or an -es and nouns ending in -e will get an -en right? Does anything else make the nouns change and also would I be able to guess whether it is an -e or an -es or is it just like definite articles where I have to memorize it with the word.

Those are the questions that were bothering me and I couldn't really find online except for the 6th because I thought of it just while I was writing it.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Carsten Schultz, Takkat Jul 4 at 6:33

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Welcome to German Language SE. Please avoid asking more than one question. The site's design will only work well following "one question - one answwer". See tour. –  Takkat Jul 4 at 6:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it's generally suggested to limit yourself to one question at a time, but here goes:

What is the difference between "Bin Ich" and "Ich bin"?

Pretty much the same as in English "Am I" vs. "I am". The inversion is usually used for questions. If you encounter a sentence that's not a question, I'd like to see it (perhaps post it as a comment?)

Which form of the noun do you use when there is a mix of that occupation. Like there are 2 boy students and 2 girl students and you just want to group them together. Do you just say " Die Schüler ".

You could do that, but it's no longer considered P.C. See How do Germans refer to people without caring about the gender for a much more elaborate discussion.

What do you say when you don't know the gender of a person ( not to be rude ) or a thing do you just put it in the masculine form kind of like we do in English?

How can that be? If it's a thing, you're supposed to know the genus. Look it up if you have to. If you are addressing a person whose gender you are unclear about either ask or use something like (Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren / Dear Sir or Madam).

"Erik kommt heute mit der Bahn nach Hause." "Heute kommt Erik mit der Bahn nach Hause."

Both are correct, they just stress different parts of the sentence. The first example is a regular sentence while the second one puts slightly more emphasis on the heute part. (Was machst du heute? Heute kommt Erik.)

The noun only changes form while in the Genitive form

I am afraid declination is much more complicated than that.

... is it just like definite articles where I have to memorize it with the word.

I believe there is a limited number of cases.

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for the bin ich and ich bin example: "Hier bin ich und bleibe hier" I heard it in a song. And sorry for posting more than one question. –  Kentucky Fried Turkey Jul 4 at 3:35
    
bin ich may be also the (shortened) answer to a question: "Bist du Deutscher?" "[Ja, das] Bin ich!" –  Landei Jul 4 at 7:06
    
Actually "bin ich" is quite frequent also in non-question sentences. Da bin ich mir ganz sicher. Basically, if there's an initial part like giving location or time, or a subordinate clause at the beginning of the sentence (I'm sure there's an official grammatical term for that situation), then it can move the subject after the verb. "Ich bin Mensch." → "Hier bin ich Mensch.", "Ich bin müde." → "Heute bin ich müde.", "Er hat eine gute Idee." → "Manchmal hat er eine gute Idee.", "Sie ist nie da." → "Freitags ist sie nie da.", "Ich lese nicht." → "Wenn ich müde bin, lese ich nicht." –  celtschk Jul 8 at 13:16
    
Yes, but without such a clause it makes you sound like a foreigner ("Bin ich Abdul".) –  Ingmar Jul 8 at 13:24

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