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Does it mean "alive," lively or both?

And am I using it properly in my translation of the title song from the Sound of Music?

Lebendig sind die Berge,
Mit dem Klang der Musik.
Mit altern Lieder,
Eines Tausend Jahre.

Die Berge erfuellt mich,
Mit dem Klang der Musik.
Dann singt mein Herz gerne
Jedes Lied.

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It can mean both, but "lebendig mit" is not a good translation of "alive with". "Von" or "durch" instead of "mit" is better. –  Stefan Walter Jul 17 '11 at 14:37
    
I was quite surprised when I first heard that both "e" 's in that word are open. I had expected a closed "e" followed by a schwa, as in "leben". Explanation someone? (I feel that this is not important enough to warrant a new question). –  Georges Elencwajg Jul 17 '11 at 15:15
    
@Georges: I'd pronounce it exactly as you describe. –  Stefan Walter Jul 17 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Georges: It might be important enough for a second question. Clearly, it is a special case. Which is kind of why I asked the first one. –  Tom Au Jul 18 '11 at 14:24
    
I like 'mit' more than 'durch'. And if, then 'vom Klang der Musik' - not 'von'. But 'from the sound of music' or 'by the sound of music' would have been possible in Englisch as well, so why did the author choose 'With'? I would keep it. –  user unknown Jul 19 '11 at 2:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Indeed your translation of "alive" is correct here:

lebendig = alive (or "lively", depending on context)

lebhaft = lively

However, I can't resist to suggest improvements for the following lines:

Lebendig werden die Berge
mit dem Klang der Musik.
Mit alten Liedern
aus tausenden Jahren.

Die Berge sind erfüllt
mit dem Klang der Musik.
Mein Herz singt mit jedem Lied, das es hört.

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3  
correct answer; I just want to add, that lebendig has a second meaning, which is lebhaft: "Alexander ist ein sehr lebendiges Kind." –  splattne Jul 17 '11 at 15:28
    
I was just about to edit this in when I was blocked by your edit ;) –  Takkat Jul 17 '11 at 15:31

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