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I've just seen an election poster which says "Verantwortung und Augenmaß" which literally translates into "Responsibility and quick'n'dirty measurement".

What does it mean in a political context?

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Note that "quick'n dirty" has a sense of sloppiness that Augenmaß does not (necessarily) have. It aims for good judgement, whether you talk about physical measurements or use the term in a metaphorical sense. – Stephie Feb 18 at 7:20
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quick'n'dirty measurement in politics? come on – Alex Feb 18 at 14:50
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@Alex I see what you did there... – OddDev Feb 18 at 14:58
up vote 23 down vote accepted

Augenmaß has two meanings, here the second fits:

  1. Fähigkeit, in angemessener Weise zu handeln; Besonnenheit, Umsicht
    Beispiele
    das rechte Augenmaß verloren haben
    Politik mit Augenmaß (Besonnenheit, Realitätssinn)

So a very rough translation would be
"Responsibility and a sense of good judgement/appropriateness"

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Ah, easy as that :) I felt like "Yeah, that fits somehow... but why?" It's clear now - thanks. – OddDev Feb 18 at 7:21
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@OddDev it might be related to to eyeball: To measure or estimate roughly by sight – overactor Feb 18 at 11:50
    
i feel like both meanings dont fit :) – Alex Feb 18 at 14:53
    
@Alex That's just because you know politicians... – Deduplicator Feb 19 at 3:19
    
While (very) close, 'Augenmaß' has a more professional co-notation than 'eyeballing' - Which roughly translates to 'Schätzen' – tofro Feb 20 at 7:37

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