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Is there a translation of at least the New Testament into German which uses modern vocabulary and idioms, similarly to the way The Message does in English?

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Never heard of The Message. Very interesting question. –  musiKk Dec 21 '11 at 8:37
    
There are a lot of modern Bible translations. Google for modern Bible translations: Moderne Bibelübersetzungen. –  rogermue Feb 25 at 19:58
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3 Answers

There is a contemporary translation of The Bible done by the "Gute Nachricht" project. The translation is available as print or online (free). At the online portal you will also find various other translations including Luther's.

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Thanks! It looks interesting. –  ilya n Dec 22 '11 at 8:08
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I don't know if that is what you are looking for, but there is a project called volxbibel, which is a translation done in form of a wiki under the creative commons license. Which is an interesting idea.

The language is very atypical to a bible and quite modern.

AFAIK the whole thing is controversial, because the language may not be accurate in some places or is regarded to be inappropriate for a bible.

To learn more you can visit the website of the project or read the German article on Wikipedia, which contains some pro and cons along other information.

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An interesting project! Makes me wonder if Luther would be interested in running a wiki if the technology was available at that time. –  ilya n Dec 22 '11 at 7:29
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Consider using Luther, Elberfelder or Schlachter

Even if the vocabulary is a bit unfamiliar in the beginning, it is considerably closer to the essence of the text. A lot of idoms / linguistic constructs from Luthers translation found their way into the german language. I'd say Elberfelder is a bit less concise, more literally and tends to have a complicated sentence structure.

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