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I am a German teacher at the secondary level, and my German 2 students are reading the Lese-Novelas von Hueber Verlag, such as Anna, Berlin. The book is very good for beginners, but I'm running out of activities to do with the text. So far we have written journal entries from the different characters' points of view, created and performed dialogues for scenes, illustrated chapters, answered review questions, and done summaries in English. After spending two weeks on the book, these activities are getting repetitive. Does anyone have any more ideas of how to engage students with the text, both to check comprehension and get them to use the language?

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closed as off topic by John Smithers, Alenanno, Takkat, Em1, bernd_k Feb 3 '12 at 22:23

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This doesn't have anything to do with German specifically. I don't have the rep to vote to close, but I think it's probably off topic. –  StrixVaria Feb 3 '12 at 17:43
    
@ccrockett: There are many questions that deal with reading/learning, have you tried looking at them? Look at the right, under "Related". –  Alenanno Feb 3 '12 at 19:31
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I would say this belongs on educators.SE, but seeing that it's still in commitment, it's probably okay here. However, you might want to check out the proposal: area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/23685/… –  bitmask Feb 3 '12 at 22:26

1 Answer 1

Why do you have to stick with one book, if it's already pretty much worked through? While repetitio est mater studiorum as the Latin guy would say, it can become pretty boring for the students.

And on a second note, language is very much about talking. It reminds me of having Russian at school and we learned spelling and grammar without end, but we didn't learn talking, which is pretty sad. So I would recommend to let them talk - and by talk I don't mean artificial conversations following a template, but talk freely, even if it's full of mistakes.

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