Take the 2-minute tour ×
German Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of German wanting to discuss the finer points of the language and translation. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do negations used with "dürfen" carry the same meaning as "must not" in German? That is, does a sentence like:

Sie dürfen nicht jemandem erzählen.

mean the same thing as

Sie dürfen niemandem erzählen.

Similarly, does

Sie dürfen Schuhe drinnen nicht tragen.

imply the same thing as

Sie dürfen keine Schuhe drinnen tragen.

If not, what are the differences in meaning between the two sentences in each case?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So generally putting dürfen into the negative, in whichever way, does mean must not. So to me your examples are the same as far as the MAIN idea is concerned... the first one is wrong by the way... nicht jemand will always morph to niemand.

There might be subtle differences in emphasis, which I consider to be highly subjective and thus not worthy to discuss... the state of permission is clear in all your examples.

There is however an example where you could argue that there is a change... if you put an obligation into the negative by saying "you have the permission not to do something".

Ihr dürft nicht die Hausaufgaben machen.

Ihr dürft die Hausaufgaben nicht machen.

Ihr dürft keine Hausaufgaben machen.

For all these it is not totally clear whether this is a weirdly phrased permission to forgo the homeworks or if it is the order not to do them... because... I don't know... the book would explode if homeworks were done :). So here I would say that the third phrasing is the least ambiguous in that it clearly prohibits the doing of homeworks while the others are a bit equivocal.

Technically this ambiguity is also there for your examples BUT it is maybe 1 % vs 99 % and thus nobody would even be aware it is there.

share|improve this answer

Die Antwort ist ja, aber die Beispiele sind, vom Satzbau, falsch, oder zumindest ungewöhnlich.

Die ersten 2 Sätze sind unvollständig.

Sie dürfen nicht jemandem erzählen, dass ...

Sie dürfen niemandem erzählen, dass ...

Diese 2 Beispiele sind womöglich bewusst so gepostet worden, aber hier gehört das drinnen vorgezogen.

Sie dürfen drinnen nicht Schuhe tragen.

Sie dürfen drinnen keine Schuhe tragen.

share|improve this answer
    
"Sie dürfen drinnen nicht Schuhe tragen" doesn't sound as natural as the version with keine. Probably because it's not part of the predicate. –  Grantwalzer Sep 25 at 7:42

I give you some examples:

you must = du musst (Sie müssen)

english:

You have no choice. You must go home.

german:

Du hast keine Wahl. Du musst heim gehen.
Sie haben keine Wahl. Sie müssen heim gehen.


you may = du darfst (Sie dürfen)

english:

Yes, you may eat this bread if you want.

german:

Ja, du darfst dieses Brot essen wenn du möchtest.
Ja, Sie dürfen dieses Brot essen wenn Sie möchten.


you must not = du darfst nicht (Sie dürfen nicht)

english:

You must not drive through my garden! It is forbidden!

german:

Du darfst nicht durch meinen Garten fahren. Es ist verboten!
Sie dürfen nicht durch meinen Garten fahren. Es ist verboten!


you may not = du musst nicht (Sie müssen nicht)

english:

The weather is so warm today. You may not wear the coat today.

german:

Heute ist so warmes Wetter. Du musst den Mantel heute nicht tragen.
Heute ist so warmes Wetter. Sie müssen den Mantel heute nicht tragen.


Your examples had some errors:


wrong: Sie dürfen nicht jemandem erzählen.
right: Sie dürfen es niemandem erzählen.

  • You must say WHAT is forbiten to tell ("es" or "etwas").
  • "nicht jemand" is incorrect. Use "niemand" instead.

wrong: Sie dürfen niemandem erzählen.
right: Sie dürfen es niemandem erzählen.

I don't know if "you must tell nobody" is good english. In german it must be "you must tell it nobody"


wrong: Sie dürfen Schuhe drinnen nicht tragen. right: Sie dürfen drinnen keine Schuhe tragen.


wrong: Sie dürfen keine Schuhe drinnen tragen. right: Sie dürfen drinnen keine Schuhe tragen.

share|improve this answer
3  
Sorry but imho : "Sie dürfen Schuhe drinnen nicht tragen" is not wrong... it is fine. –  Emanuel Apr 11 '12 at 18:14
    
may not is prohibitive, it means that one is not allowed to do something, you seem to confuse it with might not –  H.B. Apr 11 '12 at 18:36
    
Ist Sag niemandem! falsch? Oder muss man Sag es niemandem sagen? –  diN0bot Apr 15 '12 at 22:20
    
I don't think English is as clear as these examples suggest. EG: May I go to the party? You may not!, which in German uses dürfen as the conjugated verb in both sentences. Using may to indicate ambivalence is based on context, and often followe by want to... which is actualy just giving permission to the desire. –  diN0bot Apr 15 '12 at 22:23
1  
Schön, aber Du hast vergessen, die Frage zu beantworten. –  Carsten Schultz Sep 25 at 7:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.