Take the 2-minute tour ×
German Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of German wanting to discuss the finer points of the language and translation. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ZEIT ONLINE wrote (1999):

Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe: Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern, vor 40 Jahren ein anderer: Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß.

This sentence is also cited as example in Wiktionary for the term aberrant.

Is this sentence correct? I wonder if the use of the colons and the comma is correct, and if the quoted titles shoudn't be enclosed in quotation marks?

I can't definitely say how I'd write this. I can think of several ways:

  • One sentence, with quotes, with colons: Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe: »Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern«, vor 40 Jahren ein anderer: »Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß«.
  • One sentence, with quotes, without colons: Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe »Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern«, vor 40 Jahren ein anderer »Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß«.
  • Two sentences, without quotes, with colons: Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe: Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern. Vor 40 Jahren ein anderer: Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß.
  • Two sentences, with quotes, with colons: Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe: »Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern«. Vor 40 Jahren ein anderer: »Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß«.

    (not sure: should the . be inside of »…«, although they are not part of the actual title?)

  • Two sentences, with quotes, without colons: Vor 100 Jahren titelte ein Biologe »Sexuelle Perversion bei männlichen Käfern«. Vor 40 Jahren ein anderer »Aberrantes sexuelles Verhalten beim südafrikanischen Strauß«.

Or maybe use a semicolon instead of a comma resp. a full stop?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think you can do it in two sentences because the second part doesn't have a verb and therefore isn't a sentence. Excellent question, though. I've never before wondered about the necessity of quotation marks and colons. –  elena Jan 25 '13 at 8:45
1  
Regarding your question in parentheses: I believe that when you have a complete sentence, the fullstop/period (.) goes inside the quote marks. If, however, the quotation is being incorporated only as a snippet into a sentence that you write, the fullstop stays on the outside. Sorry, no time to look for an online reference. By the way, if I remember right, that is also what the Chicago Manual of Style recommends for English writing. –  Eugene Seidel Jan 25 '13 at 13:33
    
I'd consider the original quote correct. But then, I'd also consider all your suggestions correct, and they all have the same meaning as the original. So it's really a matter of personal preference. –  Philipp Jan 26 '13 at 21:09
add comment

2 Answers 2

Ich kann leider kein Englisch, also schreibe auf Deutsch. Von mir aus sind

Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe „S...n“ und vor vierzig Jahren ein anderer „A...ß“.

und

Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe: S...n. Vor vierzig Jahren titelte ein anderer: A...ß.

richtig geschrieben. Die anderen werden wie folgt als problematisch gesehen.

  • Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe: „S...n“, vor vierzig Jahren ein anderer „A...ß“.

  • Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe: „S...n“, vor vierzig Jahren ein anderer: „A...ß“.

Nach Doppelpunkt wird ein in Anführungszeichen stehender Text als zitiert betrachtet, was der absichtlichen Bedeutung nicht entspricht, denn hier wird lediglich ein Titel erwähnt.

  • Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe: „S...n“. Vor vierzig Jahren ein anderer: „A...ß“.

Wie vorher gesagt darf beim Schreiben eines Titels kein Doppelpunkt+„…“ verwendet werden. Zudem fehlt dem zweiten Satz ein Tätigkeitswort, also einem Verb, nämlich „titeln“, denn ein wiederholtes Verb darf nur innerhalb eines einzigen Satzes weggelassen werden.

  • Vor einhundert Jahren titelte ein Biologe „S...n“. Vor vierzig Jahren ein anderer „A...ß“.

Wiederum fehlt das Verb im zweiten Satz.

Zu guter Letzt gehört dem Titel kein Punkt, also steht der Punkt außerhalb der Anführungszeichen.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's hard to find a definitive answer, since there is no official orthography in Germany. Most commonly are the rules from Duden or from "Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung" quoted.

Colon: Duden (rule 34) says that a colon should be used before announced titles. This fits the usage in your quote. The rules from RfdR, do not mention such a usage of the colon.

Quotation marks may be used to designate titles: Duden, rule 8.1 or RfdR, § 94(1).

The comma is used to separate a subordinate clause and should be outside the quotation marks (if they are used), since it is not part of the title.

To quote within a quote, single quotes are usually used and not different quotation marks, as in your example. Although I can't find anything about it in the rules, it's IMHO wrong to write „… »…« …“. You should either write „… ‚…‘ …“ or »… ›…‹ …«.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding your last paragraph: Yes, I know that "rule", but I thought it would be clearer for this question if I mix them. However, I think I'll better remove the outer quotes altogether. –  unor Jan 26 '13 at 0:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.