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What is the difference between those two words? Are they interchangeable?
Could you please provide some examples of their usage?

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Did you look them up in a dictionary (monolingual and/or bilingual). They do have a small overlap but other than this they are easy to distinguish. –  Em1 Jun 27 '13 at 15:00
    
Yes, but in the bilingual I've used, I could not find the difference. And I'm not expert enough, yet, to use proficiently a monolingual :( –  Carlo Jun 27 '13 at 15:48
    
Simply look at "antun" @ dict.leo.org/?lang=de –  falkb Jun 28 '13 at 6:36
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is from my perception:

antun (more precisely jemandem etwas antun)

  • formally to describe that someone was hurt (usually when directed at the victim) - connotation of dismay likely

    • Wer hat ihnen das angetan?
    • Wer würde jemandem soetwas antun?
    • Wir taten ihnen Unausprechliches an.
  • somewhat often but rather informally used

    • to describe something that is cumbersome or annoying:
      • Das Buch will ich mir nicht antun.
    • to express perceived injustice with connotation of disbelieve
      • Wie konntest du mir das nur antun?

tun

  • very similar to the english to do for ambiguously describing an action
    • Was wollen wir jetzt tun?
    • Das solltest du nicht tun.
  • but also similarly versatile and complex when used in phrases (too many for me to post here)

However, I cannot think of a scenario where they would be directly interchangeable.

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+10 if I could. --- "I cannot think of a scenario where they would be interchangeable." -> duden.de/rechtschreibung/antun#Bedeutung1a This is the only thing where they are quite close. To my ear it sounds somewhat stilted though. --- "somewhat often but rather informally used" -> this is the figurative use of your previous point –  Em1 Jun 27 '13 at 16:20
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@Em1 Interchangability: I am a native speaker and I have never used antun in a positive way. I went with "Kann ich dir etwas Gutes tun?" instead. But I guess one can interchange the ironic version of antun with tun in this case. –  zsawyer Jun 27 '13 at 16:46
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Note the pun with "Man kann sich einen Schlips antun" ;) –  Takkat Jun 27 '13 at 17:34
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'Tun' is a nowadays rather uncommon word for 'To do' (notice the similarity?), sometimes also 'to put'; in some cases it has been replaced by "machen", but is still used a lot in following cases: 1. merged with other verbs as copula (antun, leidtun...) 2. when someone executes an aforementioned action, especially if there is an adverb as 'modifier' of that action, e.g. ('er tut es gern', 'er tut es oft', 'er tut es freiwillig') 3. Some phrases have it. Like: 'man tut, was man kann' or 'es mit etwas zu tun haben'.

Actually, it has many meanings, just like the English verb 'to do'.

'Antun', however, has very little uses that i know of. It can be used when the action is directed at someone or something. It can be a good or a bad action, but it is more commonly used with the latter. 'Das tut mir nichts an!' ('This (action) does not affect me/harm me') 'Er hat mir böses angetan!' ('He did bad things to me!')

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I want to add one thing that is not mentioned in the other answer.

As @Matthaeus is indicating, antun can also be used in a positive way. This usually happens in the following idioms:

es jemandem angetan haben
von etw./jdm. angetan sein

This means that you're really excited by something or someone.

Das süße Mädel da drüber hat es mir angetan.
Die Heavy-Metal Musik hat es mir voll angetan.
Ich war von der Idee sehr angetan.

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Great addition! ... but always use the past form there from "antun" ---> "angetan"... So never say it in present form like "Die Musik tut es mir an" or even in the future form. In this case of "antun" you can only use the past form. –  user2238 Jun 29 '13 at 0:06
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