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What is the Etymology of the word "Langenscheidt"?

Also, does it have a meaning other than the name for a publishing group?

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If no online dictionary has it why would you think that it is a word? Do you have any clues that it could be one? Just curios... –  Emanuel Jul 24 '13 at 15:01
    
Because no online dictionary of German is, if you will, unabridged. So I thought this was one of those many words that are nowhere to be found in these dictionaries. Quite a usual fact. –  indoxica Jul 24 '13 at 15:10
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still curious... do you have an example for a word that is nowhere to be found? That would really and honestly surprise me considering that most of the dictionaries are crowd sourced and especially dict.cc has an insane number of phrase-entries. Thanks in advance. –  Emanuel Jul 24 '13 at 15:37
    
@Emanuel Take was für ein. The only online dictionary, of any trust, that refers to this pronoun is the one that you've mentioned. In it, the pronoun is translated as what a. However, when, a few days ago, I asked what it meant, martina told me it meant what kind of. Though similar in meaning, what a and what kind of are really not the same thing. As none of the "big" dictionaries list this pronoun in their database, I was, quite expectingly, left in the dark as to the exact meaning of this pronoun. And examples of this kind abound. As far as I'm concerned, dict.cc is not reliable... –  indoxica Jul 24 '13 at 15:55
    
@Emanuel ... as it only gives contextual, almost literary translations, which, as you may already know, will vary depending on where (and how) they are actually used. –  indoxica Jul 24 '13 at 15:57
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, apparently (I didn't know, I looked it up), the name Langenscheidt comes from Langscheyt which refers to a place near a lange Scheide. Scheide in names of places nearly always refers to watershed. In this case a long (lang) mountain crest is meant, which is a watershed.

That's a possible etymology. But currently it is no word.

(I assumed you already knew, that it's the name of the publishing group named after its founder Gustav Langenscheidt)

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You really understood the spirit of my question. Thank you! –  indoxica Jul 24 '13 at 15:11
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"Langenscheidt" refers to a well-known German publisher of foreign language dictionaries and is sometimes used as a generic term for "dictionary".

A bit more information about the company: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langenscheidt

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