Take the 2-minute tour ×
German Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of German wanting to discuss the finer points of the language and translation. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read it in a letter where the girl was signing it off. The rough idea I get but I want to know what does the extra 'noch' do to the overall meaning of this fragment.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

The noch is a shortening of auch noch, which literally means additionally.

In spoken language, it is used, when a talk is cut short: There wasn't time to talk extensively about the person concerned. But the person should at least be greeted, so the greetings are "added" to the end of the talk.

I haven't seen it used in a letter and wouldn't do so, because it looks as a PS with important content. One get's the impression that the writer didn't think about the letter in before hand or had to short cut the letter due to time limitations.

share|improve this answer
2  
Isn't it rather the same as with schönen Tag noch?! –  Em1 Sep 22 '13 at 20:12
    
The noch referred to in your link is a synonym of weiterhin as expressed in Koivo's answer there. This wouldn't make any sense here. As the greetings couldn't be continued (indefinitely). –  Toscho Sep 23 '13 at 16:55
add comment

This usually is rather used in colloquial speech, when you tell something in the last moment.

For instance when your friend is talking on the phone and while he is finishing the talk, you want to pass greetings to the one on the phone, saying:

noch viele Grüße

Another example would be

Als Peter dabei war die Tür zu schließen, rief sie: "Und bring [auch] noch Eier mit!"

It is not neccessary to give the auch here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.