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Could anyone suggest me most actual or appropriate analog of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) for German?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a language test, not the German language itself. –  chirlu Oct 31 '13 at 1:21
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closed as off-topic by chirlu, Vogel612, Baz, Em1, Wrzlprmft Oct 31 '13 at 18:46

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2 Answers

TestDaF is what you're looking for.

It's the most appropriate analog of TOEFL since it's accepted by all German universities. And even the test-taking procedure is similar: you will be talking to a computer (and not a human being like in IELTS).

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Besides TestDaF, three tests I've heard of:

  • Contrary to TestDaF, which is standard even worldwide, DSH (Deutsche Sprachprüfung für den Hochschulzugang) varies from university to university. And the name explains what it is.

  • The certificates of Goethe-Institut: Universities ask for a C1 or C2 level.

  • An option, which I don't know if is valid in Germany, is ÖSD the Österreichisches Sprachdiplom Deutsch.

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To be precise, I don't think they (universities) require a C2 level, it would be strongly unfair. I've checked Uni Leipzig and it wants a TestDaF 4 (roughly between and B2 and C1), here you can have a guide about usual requirements: testdaf.de/teilnehmer/pdf/informationen_en.pdf –  martina Oct 31 '13 at 8:51
    
@martina That's right. However, it depends on what you want to study. For sciences, C1 is enough. For Geistwissenschaft I think one would need C2 though. –  c.p. Oct 31 '13 at 9:10
    
@c.p.: I strongly doubt that. It's probably reverse. –  Quandary Oct 31 '13 at 14:32
    
@Quandary well, I meant Naturwissenschaft; all is published in English. On the other hand, lot is lost if you read, say, Nietzsche in English. –  c.p. Oct 31 '13 at 15:49
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