Übersetzung Englisch nach Deutsch - Questions on translations from English to German.

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6
votes
4answers
347 views

What's a good translation for “outcome measures”?

For example in the sentence: Outcome measures for this study include three-year-survival rate and relapse.
6
votes
2answers
519 views

Is “thou” the English equivalent of “Sie”?

I've always wondered this. Yes, it means "you" but it must directly translate into a more formal "you," correct?
5
votes
3answers
260 views

“Magnanimous” auf Deutsch, und eine kleine Email

I would like to ask my work colleagues if they are interested in donating some portion of their time by participating in this fantastic site. To that end, I wanted to write something tongue-in-cheek ...
7
votes
3answers
738 views

How does one say “Politically Correct” in German?

My question is whether "politisch korrekt" conveys the same meaning as "politically correct" does in English or is there another term that describes this better?
5
votes
1answer
307 views

How is the cliched plot device of 'not realising a Dr. is female' interpreted in German, where it would be obvious?

In English the title "Doctor" is the same whether or not the person is male/female, but in German there are two different words for this.
12
votes
4answers
734 views

Is there a German analog for the English expression, “It's not rocket science”?

I never heard Raketenwissenschaft in this context in Germany. Is this a case of anglicism, or are there better suited German synonyms for this expression?
3
votes
2answers
658 views

“Scheiße ist Bargeld”

I know the title is a bit rude, but that's exactly what my question is about. The title is what Google Translate recommends as the German equivalent of "shit is cash". I've often seen the expression ...
12
votes
1answer
581 views

Busy-ness, angry-ness; is there a simple German suffix rule to make an adjective a noun?

Normally, the -ness and -ty suffixes seem to be translated to -heit or -keit. But for busy-ness ("Beschäftigkeit"?), angriness ("Wutigkeit"?) and further "-ness" words it apparently isn't used. In the ...
6
votes
1answer
199 views

German idiom similar to “to put the whole matter into a nutshell”?

Do similar figure of speech exist in German or should one translate it literally? "Ein Fazit ziehen" seems to make sense, but seems to be better used as a heading with colon. "Fazit:"