Wortherkunft - The history and languages of origin of words and phrases.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (4)

6
votes
2answers
169 views

»wenn ich mich nicht vertue« – origin of »vertue«

In another thread, user Em1 begins a comment with the phrase, wenn ich mich nicht vertue ... which I understand as if I’m not mistaken ... What is that verb he’s using? It looks to me ...
6
votes
2answers
233 views

Usage of “scheinbar”

Follow up on this question. Can "scheinbar" be used in the sense of "angeblich"? Examples from the question above, and Zwiebelfisch: Er schläft scheinbar. (You know he is not sleeping, just ...
27
votes
6answers
5k views

Why are German numbers backwards?

Latin languages, as well as English, speak numbers from left to right, in the same direction in which they are written, e.g. forty-two, quarante-deux, but in German, you write from left to right but ...
7
votes
2answers
158 views

Warum Drittanbieter?

Wenn ich, häufig günstigere, Ersatzteile, Druckerpatronen oder anderes Verbrauchsmaterial kaufe, dann ist häufig die Rede von Drittherstellern. Unter dem "Ersthersteller" könnte ich mir ja ja den ...
7
votes
1answer
182 views

Woher kommt das Wort “Purzelbaum”?

Woher kommt das Wort "Purzelbaum"? Das Wort beschreibt das Kopfüberrollen am Boden, das Kinder oft und gerne tun.
4
votes
2answers
409 views

What is the etymology of “Strauß”?

As a person with very little knowledge of German, I found the word for Ostrich to be a bit of a surprise. What's the etymology? Does the following function as any sort of pun? Herr Strauss ...
3
votes
2answers
265 views

Warum spricht man von Alt-/Mittelhochdeutsch?

Vor Luthers Bibelübersetzung sprach jede Region ihren eigenen Dialekt, so sprach man in Sachsen Sächsisch und in Schwaben Schwäbisch. Angehörige verschiedener Volksgruppen verstanden sich kaum. Luther ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Why “Bitteschön”?

I know that the word Bitte can have many different meanings. When translating Bitteschön into English word for word however, it makes no sense at all. My question thus is where does this expression ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Historischer Gebrauch des Begriffs “Kanakermann”

Laut Wikipedia soll das Schimpfwort "Kanake" aus dem seemännischen Ehrentitel "Kanakermann" stammen: Kannakermann war im späten 19. Jahrhundert unter deutschen Seemännern eine verbreitete ...
4
votes
1answer
343 views

Idiom: einen Türken bauen. Etymology?

What is the origin of the strange idiom "einen Türken bauen"? I have already checked wiktionary, and they present a few alternatives. All these alternatices are insufficient IMO, as they all smell ...
9
votes
2answers
512 views

What's the origin of the word “Frauenzimmer”?

"Frauenzimmer" must be the strangest German word I learned so far, and when our teacher taught it to us I didn't expect to find it in writing soon. But I encountered it already in the third sentence ...
4
votes
3answers
383 views

What's the relationship between “Fehler” and “Befehl”?

The two seem to have pretty different meanings, one meaning a mistake and the other meaning an order. The usual "be- as transitive marker" explanation doesn't really seem to help here either. What ...
4
votes
2answers
244 views

Mein Name ist Hase

This is a phrase often used to indicate "I don't know anything about that" or "I don't understand what happened". I've deduced this meaning from the contexts of the many situations where I ...
-1
votes
3answers
134 views

Webwörter neu erfinden - Für google, duckduckgo, photoshop

Please provide the equivalent german words for the following terms. google (verb) photoshopped (verb and abjective) duck it (from duckduckgo.com - brand new) Is there any urban dictionary (apart ...
2
votes
3answers
174 views

Existence of the word “analkoholisch” (antialkoholisch)

I'm wondering if I can use the word "analkoholisch" for things like water, coke etc. This word sounds quite familiar to me, but I know that the correct term would be "antialkoholisch" or ...
8
votes
3answers
191 views

Woher kommt das Negative in “Zustände”

Es gibt in Deutsch zwei Wendungen in denen Zustände per se negativ ist. Zustände sind das hier. Da kriegt man ja Zustände. Seit wann gibt es die, und woher kommt die Negativität?
5
votes
4answers
929 views

English Present Progressive and German language

Actually 2 questions: Do English Present Progressive and German Partizip 1 have the same grammatical origin? I mean something like I am thinking. and Ich bin denkend., although German uses it only ...
15
votes
3answers
891 views

What's the origin of “Bock haben”/“Null Bock”?

I've heard about "Bock haben" or "Null Bock!" which colloquially means to be up for sth. (or not), but where has it developed from? It seems to have started around 1980 (look at ngram).
3
votes
2answers
97 views

poetogen – Alternativbedeutungen, Herkunft, Herleitung

Über den Begriff poetogen stolpere ich immer wieder und suche deshalb nach Erklärungen, wie es zu zu diesem kam. Unter den ersten Google-Treffern ist die Topik des Sonetts, die eine Erklärung liefert: ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Etymology of “Wertgegenstand”

I can't understand very well.. According to canoo.net, Wertgegenstand is composed of Wert (value), gegen (against) and Stand (state). So does this mean something like "stand against value?" And what ...
13
votes
4answers
945 views

What is the origin of the word “Ursprung”?

From which words does the German Ursprung originate? In Portuguese we have the translation origem (origin), but I need to know more about this word. I tried to separate the ur from the sprung to see ...
3
votes
2answers
82 views

Etymlogy of “Bedürfnis”

I've tried to search on Google for the etymology of this word but I couldn't find it (or at least I couldn't understand that it was an etymology since it was written in German). Bedürfnis should mean ...
1
vote
2answers
922 views

What's the meaning of “würde”?

I know the meaning of the following sentence Ich würde gerne einen Termin machen. Trying to better understand the words like wollen, gern, möchten, würde etc., I realized that the meaning of ...
5
votes
4answers
979 views

Splitting the German word “Taucherausrüstung”

I mean splitting into prefix, suffix, and so on. Like when you look at the etymology. For example: Gelegenheit is: Ge+ legen + heit To better understand some German words I'm trying to ...
0
votes
1answer
324 views

What's the meaning from “Machenschaft”

I’m writing about Heidegger’s use of the word Machenschaft and I would like to try to explain this word correctly because I chose to keep it in German. In my language it was translated as Maquinação, ...
2
votes
3answers
217 views

Welches Geschlecht hat “Quest”?

In Rollenspielen gibt es oft das Wort Quest, allerdings jedes mal mit einem anderen Geschlecht. Ich habe in verschiedenen Video- und Rollenspielen wirklich jede Möglichkeit gesehen: Die Quest Der ...
4
votes
6answers
845 views

What is the etymology of “sau-”?

I lived in Germany during half a year and when hanging out, I heard lots of times this word. I know it's quite an inappropriate word prefix and that it should only be used in a friendly setting, but ...
6
votes
1answer
215 views

Herkunft von “Ausnahmen bestätigen die Regel”

The idiom "Ausnahmen bestätigen die Regel" exists in English, too. The exception proves the rule. However, someone recently told me that this originally was based on the old meaning of "to ...
2
votes
1answer
225 views

Weak masculine nouns

Has anybody come across reliable ways to know if a masculine noun is weak or not? Der Präsident... Wir brauchen einen neuen Präsidenten. Der Held... Gotham braucht einen Helden. I have noticed ...
8
votes
2answers
234 views

Meaning and usage of “sich unterstehen”

I found this (dwds.de): sich einer Sache unterstehen sich anmaßen, erdreisten, etw. zu tun niemand unterstand sich, ihr zu widersprechen So sich einer Sache unterstehen means sich anmaßen ...
0
votes
2answers
147 views

Etymology and usage of “freuen” and “froh”?

Is there an etymological connection between these two words that share a similar meaning? And also, do they share the same meaning?
5
votes
2answers
393 views

Verwandtschaft von “-lich”, “-ig” etc

In meinen etymologischen Quellen (DWDS, Duden) finde ich, dass das Suffix -lich mit gleich und Englisch like verwandt ist. Zu -ig und -isch findet man hingegen nichts bzw. die Angabe einer ...
7
votes
1answer
869 views

Woher kommt der Ausdruck “sich zusammenreißen”

ich bin heute mal wieder über das Verb "sich zusammenreißen" im Sinne von "Jetzt reiß' dich mal zusammen" gestolpert. Von der reinen Bedeutung her ist das Wort unlogisch, da reißen immer ...
41
votes
3answers
11k views

Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages?

Excuse me if this is off-topic. When I'm learning other languages, I usually (99% of the time) find that "England" is either the same or very similar in the other language. However, I know at least ...
6
votes
7answers
354 views

Etymology of “geteilt durch”

Why does one say for instance "6 geteilt durch 2 ist 3"? Why "geteilt durch" but not "geteilt auf"? What you actually mean is "6 Dinge aufteilen auf 2 Personen, und jeder bekommt 3".
17
votes
3answers
10k views

Meaning of 0815 and ger/eng alternatives?

Does 0815 simply mean something is very standard and common, or does it carry any connotations? Where can one use it, e.g. for description of processes, objects, persons? Can you give alternative ...
3
votes
1answer
194 views

Etymology of the Swissgerman word “gnusch”

Weiss jemand etwas zur Etymologie, zur Herkunft des wunderbaren schweizerdeutschen Wortes "Gnusch"?
5
votes
3answers
241 views

What is the origin of “den Bogen raus haben”?

Metaphorically, this phrase means something like "getting the hang of". But what is "Bogen" referring to, literally, in this case? (Come to think of it, I have no idea what "getting the hang of it" ...
5
votes
2answers
139 views

Woher kommt das „ä“ in „bettlägerig“?

Als ich zum ersten Mal das Wort hörte, dachte ich, dass man bettlegerig (aus "legen") schreiben sollte. Ich versuche, den Ursprung des „ä“s im Adjektiv bettlägerig nachzuvollziehen. Es beschreibt, ...
9
votes
1answer
172 views

Wie kam das 'e' in den “Schmied”?

Schon länger frage ich mich, wie es zur Dehnung des "i"-Vokals und zur Bildung eines "-ie-" in der Berufsbezeichnung "Schmied" kam. Im Duden, aber auch in anderen Wörterbüchern ist die Herkunft aus ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Unterschied und Etymologie von faschistisch und faschistoid?

Wiktionary gibt faschistoid als dem Faschismus ähnlich, faschistische Eigenschaften aufweisend aus. Also "ein bisschen/teilweise/leicht faschistisch"? Scheint mir ein sehr dehnbarer Begriff, ...
9
votes
2answers
340 views

What is the meaning and origin of “Butzen”?

Presently around the Swabian-Alemannic "Fasnet" we can often read of "Butzenzunft", or "Butzenlauf", or "Butzen", obviously referring to people in traditional costumes. Image showing a "Butzen" ...
12
votes
3answers
575 views

Wo leitet sich das verstärkende Präfix “stink-” her?

Erst in neuerer Zeit findet man das verstärkende Präfix "stink-" zu verschiedenen Adjektiven: stinksauer stinkreich stinknormal ...und noch viele mehr. Ist etwas darüber bekannt, woher dieses ...
17
votes
3answers
906 views

Woher kommt das g in „Kopenhagen“? Why is there a g in “Copenhagen”?

Der zweite Wortteil des dänischen Namens København bedeutet, wie man auch leicht errät, Hafen, und in der Tat ist der schwedische Name Köpenhamn, wobei hamn das schwedische Wort für Hafen ist. ...
9
votes
1answer
627 views

Prefix “emp–” (assimilated from “ent–”) in “empfinden” and “empfehlen” – etymology, explanation?

Eine schwer zu googlende Frage: Woher kommt das Präfix „emp–” [„em-“]? Kann man sich die Bedeutungen von „empfehlen“ und „empfinden“ herleiten, indem man diese Verben als aus deren Stamm mit diesem ...
5
votes
1answer
167 views

Etymologie des Wortes “abknibbeln”

In Anlehnung an die Frage Woher kommt das Wort “abnippeln”? interessiert mich die Herkunft des Wortes "abknibbeln", welches ich seit meiner Kindheit im Ruhrgebiet kenne und auch häufig verwende. ...
5
votes
1answer
134 views

Etymological relatives of English “put” and “get” in standard and dialect German

The English verbs put and get have a long etymological history and several close etymological relatives amongst the Germanic languages. But correspondences to standard German seem to be completely ...
11
votes
2answers
401 views

What word did the Germans use for “Buchstabe” before print was invented?

I've often wondered about this. "Buchstabe" obviously(?) derives from the letters used in the early printing presses (think Gutenberg). What did they call a letter before Gutenberg? update ...
3
votes
2answers
159 views

Etymology of the word “Aberglaube”

I am interested in the etymology of the German word "Aberglaube". As an anglophone, this word for 'superstition' has an interesting literal translation into English. I am curious about the etymology ...
6
votes
2answers
194 views

Über den Ursprung der zu „einen Vogel haben“ zugeordneten Geste

Anstelle folgender Aussagen: Du hast einen Vogel, bei dir piept es wohl, usw. macht man manchmal eine Geste. Ich erkenne nur folgende Zeichen. Zeigefinger zur Stirn, genau wo die Schläfe ...