Grammatik - Questions on rules for composing clauses.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
2answers
497 views

Is it “wenn” or “falls”?

If I want to say, If I want to say, do I simply say, Wenn ich will sagen? Or do I have to use falls instead of wenn: Falls ich will sagen? Or can both wenn and falls be used in this context? I know ...
47
votes
7answers
943 views

Gibt es im Deutschen Reste von anderen grammatischen Fällen als den vier üblichen?

Ich habe mal gehört, dass das "Hause" in "zu Hause" ein Lokativ ist. Gibt es noch andere Überbleibsel von ungewöhnlichen grammatischen Fällen im Deutschen? Does German contain relics of other ...
18
votes
1answer
24k views

Der, die oder das Email?

Is there an official rule on whether it's die Email or das Email? I've heard people use both, although more commonly the female form.
15
votes
3answers
6k views

Recommended ways to learn the cases?

My German tutor recently told me that the only real way to learn the cases - Accusative/Dative/Nominative/Genitive - is just to memorize which verbs are which. She suggests memorizing the Dative and ...
16
votes
7answers
399 views

“Wir waren hier gelaufen” vs. “Wir sind hier gelaufen”

I'd sometimes like to indicate a completed action in the past by using the Plusquamperfekt, as indicated in the title. Whenever I do this, I seem to get strange looks. I have a feeling that I am ...
14
votes
3answers
16k views

Singular/Plural bei Aufzählungen

Man betrachte folgende zwei Sätze: Demnach muss nun das Ziel und der Zweck der Regelung ermittelt werden. oder Demnach müssen nun das Ziel und der Zweck der Regelung ermittelt werden. ...
13
votes
1answer
550 views

Zweite und dritte Person im gleichen Satz - wonach richtet sich das Verb?

This question also has an answer here (in English): "Paula und ich bin..." or "Paula und ich sind..." Wenn man zwei verschiedene Personen im gleichen Satzteil beschreibt, von denen einer ...
11
votes
4answers
251 views

Subjunctive combined with “als”

In another question recently asked here, there was an als sentence as a subclause of indirect speech. The question was whether to use subjunctive or preterite and the only answer there stated that the ...
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Singular verb for plural subject

I’ve found some examples like: Alles ist richtig. Meine Familie ist sehr geil. Are there other examples of same usage?
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is it “mir ist übel” and not “ich bin übel”?

To express we feel nauseous we may say Mir ist übel. Mir ist schlecht. Mir ist schwindlig. What are the grammatical rules behind this? Why don't we say "Ich bin übel" when we say Ich bin ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Two-way prepositions used with non-movement verbs.

The two-way prepositions are all the prepositions that can take both the accusative and dative case. When they are used together with a verb indicating movement there is a simple rule for figuring out ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

Meaning of “Was für ein”?

All I know about Was für ein is that it is a type of pronoun (but I don't know what type exactly it is). I also don't know how it translates into English.
10
votes
4answers
1k views

“Bis der Tod euch scheide” or “bis der Tod euch scheidet”?

In one of Rammstein’s most famous songs, Du hast, the lyrics go like this: Willst du bis der Tod euch scheide Treu ihr sein für alle Tage? Nein! Now, I am a bit puzzled why there is ...
9
votes
2answers
510 views

Can I move the separable prefix isolated at the end of the main sentence in front of the relative clause?

I learned on a website that if a relative clause separates the final verb element from the main clause, it would be awkward; the first (in bold print) in each of the pairs below is better than the ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

What's the difference between “jedenfalls” and “auf jeden Fall”?

They mean the same thing, I think, but are used differently? When can I use one, and when can I use the other?
9
votes
4answers
12k views

When would one use “im” and “am” rather than “in dem” and "an dem?

I'm new to German and I get a bit confused about when it's "dem" or "im" or "den" rather than "in der" or "in dem" and so on.
7
votes
3answers
820 views

Does German “sollen” ever function like English “shall” to indicate a future or possibility (no element of expectation)?

I understand that "sollen" typically expresses what is expected of the subject of the sentence, and found excellent accounts of that usage of "sollen" in this other StackExchange page: Does “sollen” ...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Was ist der Unterschied zwischen einem Subjunktiv und dem Konjunktiv?

In dieser Frage war von einem „Subjunktiv“ die Rede: Subjunctive I for recommendation? Dort entstand Verwirrung um die Begriffe „Subjunktiv“ und „Konjunktiv“. Ich habe etwas recherchiert und dabei ...
6
votes
1answer
290 views

Who got introduced to whom first in this sentence?

I could not understand who got introduced to whom first in the following sentence – customer to employees or employees to customer? Eine weitere Regel ist, dass man zuerst dem Kunden die ...
6
votes
1answer
365 views

Nominativ-Ergänzung und Passiv

Im Deutschen ist es möglich, einen Passivsatz ohne Subjekt zu bilden: Hier wird gearbeitet. Das ist immer dann der Fall, wenn die Aktiv-Situation intransitiv ist. Die Abwesenheit eines ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

How is the equivalent of the English “Let's …” formed?

I read this part in a book: I wonder if this is correct because I always form such sentence like the English "Let's ..." with "lassen" ("lass uns ..."), for example: Lass uns gehen Lass uns ...
5
votes
2answers
110 views

On the dativ with and without “zu” (pt. 2)

The answer to an earlier question explained that both sentences below are grammatically correct, although they differ slightly in meaning: Was hat er zu Ihnen gesagt? Was hat er Ihnen gesagt? ...
5
votes
1answer
250 views

Deklination eines Adjektivs zwischen Zahlwort und Nomen

Wenn in einem Satz die Rede von sämtlichen Dingen (plural) ist und zwischen sämtliche und dem Nomen ein Adjektiv ist: Endet dieses auf -en oder auf -e? Beispiel: Heisst es XY erfüllt sämtliche ...
5
votes
3answers
313 views

If “Brotaufstrich” is something they smear on bread, why “Fruchtaufstrich” is not smeared on fruit?

Another question here made me ask this question: if "Brotaufstrich" is something one usually smears on bread during breakfast, shouldn't "Fruchtaufstrich" mean something they smear on fruits? :) I am ...
5
votes
1answer
466 views

What is an “Ablaut”?

My understanding is that "Umlaut" represents the diacritical marks over 'a', 'o', 'u', etc. But what is an "Ablaut"? The topic came up in the comments on this question.
4
votes
6answers
6k views

Aus vs. Von - What is the difference?

My confusion at the moment lies in the difference in the two prepositions, aus and von. Please note that Dict.cc is my main resource for words and phrases, and it shows the following: I'm fairly ...
4
votes
4answers
315 views

Wer sagt “die” Nutella?

Im deutschsprachigen Raum wird "das" Nutella benutzt, aber wenn ich mich nicht irre, ist "die" Nutella eigentlich feminin. Meine Frage ist, sagt einer von euch die Nutella? Oder habt ihr es mal ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

When do suffixes “-able” or “-ible” translate with “-bar” vs. “-lich”?

We can not simply translate the suffixes "-able" or "-ible" with "-bar" as there seem to be many examples where "-lich" is used instead. avoidable - vermeidbar vulnerable - verwundbar bootable ...
3
votes
3answers
131 views

Warum „der späte Gast“, aber nicht „Der Gast ist spät“?

Normalerweise kann man die Phrase Das ist Artikel Adjektiv Substantiv. umstellen zu Das Substantiv ist Adjektiv. Also zum Beispiel Das ist ein rotes Auto. Das Auto ist rot. Beim ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

du vs dir in “How are you?”

As far as I know, du is used to mention a direct object and dir is to mention an indirect object. If that is the case, why do they use "Wie geht's dir?" to ask "How are you?", when "you" is a direct ...
3
votes
1answer
529 views

Books helping with most common mistakes of German learners?

Is there anything one could recommend to get rid of the most common mistakes the non-native German speakers make? I love the "Is That What You Mean?" series by Pinguin which features very nice ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Englische Worte in deutscher Grammatik - aber wie?

Tagtäglich benutzt man Worte aus dem Englischen im Deutschen; gerade im IT-Umfeld, aus dem ich stamme, sind sie allgegenwärtig. Bei Nomen ist der Begriff selbst unverändert, hier stellt sich nur die ...
2
votes
1answer
153 views

Kein Subjekt in »Mir wird schlecht«?

In dieser Frage kommt ein Satz mit diesem Aufbau vor: <Dativ-Objekt> <eine Form von sein oder werden> <Adjektiv>. nämlich: Julian wird etwas mulmig zumute. In diesem Beispiel ...
2
votes
3answers
211 views

“present continuous” form - have vs having

German doesn't differentiate between present tense and present continuous tense as English language does. For instance, Ich esse Brot means, "I eat/am eating bread". The same applies to the verb ...
2
votes
3answers
437 views

“umfahren” – trennbares Verb oder nicht?

Wir umfahren die Stadt. Das Auto fährt den Mann um. Wann ist das Verb umfahren trennbar und wann untrennbar?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

When to use “sein” and “haben” for verbs that allow both auxiliary verbs?

In some dictionaries, contrary to what Wiktionary states, one can find that, say, verderben allows both sein and haben as auxiliary verbs to form the Perfekt. That's the case for these verbs as well: ...
13
votes
4answers
728 views

Are sentences such as “wir waren essen” grammatically correct?

German supposedly has no equivalent of the progressive/continuous tense in English (e.g. "we are going"). However, I sometimes hear sentences such as "wir waren essen" or "er ist telefonieren". Are ...
10
votes
2answers
267 views

“Wir nachverfolgen unseren Müll nicht” Jargon oder Grammatikfehler?

In einer Fernsehdiskussion zur Mülltrennung der Bundeswehr im Auslandeinsatz ("Hart aber fair" vom 25.6.2012) bin ich auf folgendes Zitat gestoßen: "Wir nachverfolgen unseren Müll nicht"Hart aber ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Schwache Verben und starke Verben

Im Deutschen gibt es bei Verben eine Unterteilung zwischen starken und schwachen Verben. Je nachdem zu welcher Gruppe ein Wort gehört, wird das Partizip II unterschiedlich gebildet. Schwaches Verb: ...
9
votes
4answers
509 views

Wer bestimmt, welche Regeln in der deutschen Spache gelten?

Wie der Titel schon sagt: Wer (oder was) hat das letzte Wort, wenn es um Regelfragen in der deutschen Sprache geht? Die angesprochenen Regelfragen können sowohl die Grammatik als auch die ...
9
votes
1answer
157 views

is “wie geschnitten Brot” grammatically correct?

I came across this idiom in a sentence similar to this one: das iPhone verkauft sich wie geschnitten Brot geschnitten Brot sounds wrong to me, shouldn't the adjective be declined? I searched ...
9
votes
2answers
164 views

On the dativ with and without “zu”

I was surprised when I came across the sentence: Was hat er zu Ihnen gesagt? ...because I would have thought that it would have been Was hat er Ihnen gesagt?. Are they both correct? If so, is ...
9
votes
1answer
222 views

Why does “Fresnel'sche” have an apostrophe and “Gaußsche” doesn't?

In German physics literature, I often see adjectives like “Gaußsche” and “Fresnel'sche”. I know what they mean in the context, that Gauß (or Fresnel) invented something or that it is named after them. ...
8
votes
1answer
126 views

When to translate “ein” to describe people

I know that in German the words "ein" or "eine" are often dropped when referring to a person's occupation or role. Is this always the case from a grammatical point of view? Or is it a matter of style? ...
8
votes
3answers
430 views

Einzahl oder Mehrzahl verwenden, wenn beides im Satz vorher vorkommt?

Ich habe folgenden Satz: Physik und ihre Anwendungen zur Lösung quantitativer Problemstellung sind meine Leidenschaft. Nun meine Frage, ob man hier ist oder sind verwendet? Da es sich ja ...
8
votes
2answers
8k views

Welchen Fall verwendet man mit Präposition “ohne”?

Ich habe bemerkt, dass man bei uns zwar ohne dich (seltener und vermutlich falsch auch ohne dir) sagt, allerdings wird es mit Nomen anscheinend in Dativ formuliert, also z. B. ohne der Sache. Gibt es ...
8
votes
2answers
814 views

Das Partizip Perfekt von dreisilbigen Wörtern

Manfred Spitzer erklärt in seinen Büchern und Vorträgen, dass Menschen sich die Grammatik ihrer Muttersprache nicht über Einzelfälle, sondern über allgemeine (unbewusste) Regeln merken. Dazu lässt ...
7
votes
4answers
34k views

“Sehr geehrte Dame, Sehr geehrter Herr”; mit oder ohne Komma

Ich verfasse eine Spontanbewerbung an meine aktuelle Firma, wo ich im Sommer meine Ausbildung beende. Jetzt müssen alle Azubis eine Spontanbewerbung für die Firma schreiben. Weder für eine spezifische ...
7
votes
2answers
923 views

Der/die/das as demonstrative pronouns: intonation, politeness and difference with dieser/diese/dieses

Three related questions: First, I'm interested in knowing if there is any difference in the usage of der, die, das,... and dieser, diese, dieses,.... For instance z.B. Ich habe zwei Hunde. {Der ...
7
votes
5answers
963 views

“kein Klavier” or “nicht Klavier” spielen?

Ich spiele nicht Klavier. / Ich fahre Auto nicht. vs. Ich spiele kein Klavier. / Ich fahre kein Auto. What are the differences between those sentences? My grammar book says that Klavier spielen, ...