4
votes
3answers
186 views

Sometimes “s” is read like English “z”. Why?

I have seen that many times, a German word is spelled with an "s", but it is read like an English "z". Moreover, every time this happens, the Dutch cognate word is spelled with a "z". (But not the ...
11
votes
2answers
265 views

Why is »ß« substituted with »ss« rather than »sz«?

The letter ß is called Eszett, literally meaning s z. However, when the letter is not available (or when a word is in all caps), ß is almost always substituted by the digraph ss rather than sz (e.g. ...
8
votes
1answer
298 views

Warum die Buchstabenkombinationen “sch” und “ch”

Woher kommen die Buchstabenkombinationen "sch" und "ch"? Die Herkunft der Buchstabenkombination "ch" für den stimmlosen velaren Frikativ oder den stimmlosen palatalen Frikativ ist noch ...
10
votes
3answers
321 views

What caused “ss” to gain popularity over “ß” in the 19th century?

From Google Books' Ngram Viewer: Notice that the "hasst" form gained popularity towards the end of the 19th century, only to drop again in favor of "haßt" later on. I noticed the same pattern on ...
28
votes
2answers
540 views

What is the origin of the rules about the capitalization of the first letter of each noun?

To my knowledge, German is the only language which capitalize the first letter of each of its nouns. Why is there such a rule? Meines Wissens ist Deutsch die einzige Sprache, in der der erste ...