Redewendung - Questions on group of words having a meaning not deducible from individual words.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

1
vote
1answer
184 views

Wie sagt man “To have beef with someone” auf Deutsch?

Ich habe Probleme mit diesem Typ in der Kneipe. I have beef with this guy in the Bar. Wie sagt man " to have beef with somebody" auf Deutsch?
1
vote
2answers
332 views

Wie sagt man “Not in a million years!” auf Deutsch?

Willst du meine Freundin sein? - Nicht in einer Million Jahren! Wie sagt man Not in a million years auf Deutsch?
2
votes
1answer
157 views

Wie sagt man “Well-stated questions” and “formal answers” auf Deutsch?

Well I'm writing this short story about an Austrian mathemacian who came up with the mathematical notions of "well-stated questions" and "formal answers" and, to make it look more real, I would like ...
-1
votes
1answer
87 views

Alternative für den Ausdruck “Lighten up!” [closed]

Sam, Entspann dich! Das ist nur ein Hund! Sam, lighten up! It's just a dog! Gibt es eine Alternative für " Entspann Dich!" ?
5
votes
3answers
191 views

What is the origin of “den Bogen raus haben”?

Metaphorically, this phrase means something like "getting the hang of". But what is "Bogen" referring to, literally, in this case? (Come to think of it, I have no idea what "getting the hang of it" ...
1
vote
3answers
166 views

Wie sagt man “in the back of my mind ” auf Deutsch?

In the back of my mind I knew she wasn't right for me, but I loved her anyway. Im Hinterkopf wußte ich, dass sie nicht die Richtige für mich ist, jedoch habe ich sie sowieso geliebt. Ich ...
2
votes
4answers
195 views

Die Redewendung “Was hast du auf dem Herzen?”

Ich habe eine Frage zu dieser Redewendung. Bedeutet Was hast du auf dem Herzen? dasselbe wie Was möchtest du?
4
votes
3answers
410 views

Does “paar” still mean “two items”? Words that have lost their original meaning

–Ich hätte gerne ein Paar Brötchen –Wie viele? That was (modulo trivialities) a conversation that surprised me. Of course –assuming the grammatical correctness of the sentences–, the baker ...
3
votes
1answer
409 views

“Am Boden” or “auf dem Boden”?

I read somewhere that am Boden was the older version of "on the floor". When did it change? Die Toten Hosen have a song that goes: Steh auf, wenn du am Boden bist. So I wonder if this saying is ...
5
votes
2answers
474 views

“Passen wie die Faust aufs Auge” bedeutet “total” oder “gar nicht zusammenpassen”?

In Wiktionary stehen die zwei höchstwidersprüchlichen Bedeutungen: Bedeutungen: [1] umgangssprachlich: ganz und gar nicht zusammenpassen [2] umgangssprachlich: wunderbar zusammenpassen ...
2
votes
3answers
79 views

“Wo hast du dich herumgetrieben?”

I would like to know if this expression's an offense Wo hast du dich herumgetrieben? Is it used to scold somebody?
4
votes
1answer
92 views

bei jemandem einen Stein im Brett haben

I have been undertaking a beginner's class in German. I have been picking up some idiomatic phrases as I go along and have comes across the following German construction: bei jemandem einen Stein ...
3
votes
2answers
161 views

Buchstabieren = to spell?

In another question Carsten mentioned that buchstabieren has a somewhat narrower meaning than to spell. I wonder if people would care to elaborate on this? Also, does German have the Yiddish variant ...
12
votes
6answers
717 views

Was ist das Gegenteil von “Nordlicht”?

Bewohner von Norddeutschland werden hin und wieder als "Nordlichter" bezeichnet. Gibt es analog bzw. als Umkehrung dazu eine Bezeichnung für die Süddeutschen?
1
vote
3answers
106 views

Was ist das Gegenteil davon einen Zonk zu erwischen?

Wenn man "den Zonk erwischt", ist dies Ausdruck dafür ein schlimmstmögliches Ergebnis erzielt zu haben. Was wäre das sprachliche Gegenteil des Zonks?
2
votes
1answer
271 views

Is there a rapid online access to “feste Nomen-Präposition bzw. -Verb Verbindungen”?

Is it me, or is it difficult to find online, in dictionaries and so on, all the information about a "feste Nomen-Präposition Verbindungen"? Suppose you are writing in German and, for sake of ...
7
votes
3answers
6k views

Was bedeutet “Über den Tellerrand sehen”?

Was bedeutet es, wenn man von jemanden sagt, dass er nicht über den Tellerrand sieht oder das er noch nicht einmal über den Tellerrand sehen kann ?
2
votes
2answers
464 views

saying sorry in German [duplicate]

I would like to say that I am very sorry for a situaton that is not my fault but is causing serious trouble to someone, and I would like it to sound firm but not too formal as the personal context is ...
8
votes
6answers
584 views

What is the most fitting translation of “Try me!”?

Is there an equivalent for the English phrase "Try me!" in German? The only translations I could find/come up with are: Wetten? Wetten, dass? I can't help but feel like this is not the best ...
9
votes
1answer
144 views

is “wie geschnitten Brot” grammatically correct?

I came across this idiom in a sentence similar to this one: das iPhone verkauft sich wie geschnitten Brot geschnitten Brot sounds wrong to me, shouldn't the adjective be declined? I searched ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

Finance metaphors for relationships [closed]

I've recently read that there are quite a few metaphors describing relationships between humans that are taken from the financial sector. However, examples were very scarce. The best one being ...
5
votes
4answers
789 views

What is an equivalent of English “piece of cake”?

How do you say in German something that is easy to do. I have found "ein Klacks" in my dictionary, but I have a great doubt about the meaning of the word and how to use it.
6
votes
2answers
164 views

Über den Ursprung der zu „einen Vogel haben“ zugeordneten Geste

Anstelle folgender Aussagen: Du hast einen Vogel, bei dir piept es wohl, usw. macht man manchmal eine Geste. Ich erkenne nur folgende Zeichen. Zeigefinger zur Stirn, genau wo die Schläfe ...
4
votes
1answer
267 views

“Willst du mich für dumm verkaufen?” Is saying this rude?

I just want to know how to show skepticism towards something that, in my opinion, is obviously false (or a joke). I think that with friends, I would say Na, du willst mich verarschen. ...
12
votes
7answers
32k views

Prägnante deutsche Übersetzung von “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

In seiner bekannten Rede bei der Absolventenfeier in Stanford 2005 prägte Steve Jobs den Ausdruck Stay hungry. Stay foolish. Ich verstehe die Bedeutung der Worte, suche aber eine prägnante ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

An idiom likely having a more figurative translation

There is a very nice German song whose name is, Ich lass mich auf den Sommer ein. I have found the following idiom with einlassen: sich auf etw (accusative) einlassen, which is rendered as to get ...
1
vote
2answers
112 views

Is “drin” in “Es ist noch mehr drin” an idiom?

In my dictionary, drin is an idiomatic component of both drin sein (to be into it), and das ist doch nicht drin (that's not on). But I'm not sure which of these meanings go into this newspapers ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

how to translate `extend`

I have extended a casual friendly greeting towards her. Specially how do you translate the word extend in this context? Also How do you translate this: I am stating it outright!
9
votes
5answers
665 views

What is the meaning of “Das wärmste Jäckchen ist das Cognac-chen”?

I have heard this from my German friend. I know what it means in English but I don't understand the context in German. They said it's really hard to explain properly. Is it bad? I hope not.
3
votes
1answer
103 views

Nach Hackfleischspieß Art?

Ich war gerade in der Mittagspause und stolperte bei einem Kleinimbiss über folgenden Ausdruck: Döner Kebab (nach Hackfleischspieß Art) Worüber ich mich nun wunderte ist, was dies für eine ...
3
votes
2answers
162 views

“to make faces” = “Gesichter machen”?

In English we talk about "making faces," "making funny faces," etc. Is this expressed the same way in German? E.g.: Das Baby macht lustige Gesichter, wenn es ein großes Geschäft in die Windel ...
5
votes
2answers
203 views

Anything better than “weltweit” for “All over the world”?

I would like to say something like, "You have really lived all over the world!" ...like in response to someone saying they've been to many different countries. I did a Google search for this and ...
1
vote
2answers
347 views

How do you say “over the hump” in German?

Google translate gives "über den Berg", which seems wrong. It translated "hump" as "mountain," but "hump" is a small obstacle, not a large one. The context was a comment I left on a post, If you ...
3
votes
2answers
282 views

What is the children's song “Zehn kleine Zappelfinger” about?

Can anyone explain what the children's song "Zehn kleine Zappelfinger" is about? Zehn kleine Zappelfinger zappeln hin und her. Zehn kleine Zappelfinger finden´s gar nicht schwer. Zehn ...
4
votes
3answers
487 views

Translation of the idiom “no harm, no foul” in German

Do similar figure of speech exist in German or should one translate it literally?
8
votes
3answers
204 views

What is the German equivalent to “to keep under someone's thumb”?

What is the German equivalent to the idiom under someone's thumb. Even if not exactly, is there any phrase having similar meaning?
3
votes
2answers
121 views

Is it “einige vor den Kopf stoßen” or “einigen vor den Kopf stoßen”?

The whole sentence is: Mit dem Glauben an einen hinsichtlich der Präzision und Allmächtigkeit abgeschwächten Laplace'schen Dämon scheint man immer wieder einige(n?) Leuten vor den Kopf zu stoßen ...
9
votes
4answers
315 views

Is there an idiomatic equivalent for “polyglot”?

Does the word polyglot, meaning "knowing or using several languages" translate directly into German, or is there an idiomatic equivalent? Google Translate just adds an extra "t" at the end, as German ...
9
votes
3answers
407 views

Was “haut man in die Fresse”?

"Hau ihm eine in die Fresse!" (Aus 50 dessins d'humour pour perfectionner votre allemand, ) Eine was? Ich hätte "einen (Faustschlag)" erwartet.
10
votes
2answers
699 views

Woher kommt die Redewendung “Das gleiche Problem in Grün”?

Die Redewendung "Dasselbe in Grün" oder "Das gleiche Problem in Grün" bedeutet, dass zwei Dinge oder zwei Probleme praktisch übereinstimmen. Auf der deutschen Wikipedia ist zu lesen, dass es ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

Wo kommt der Ausdruck “Roter Retter” her?

Wiederholt habe ich jetzt den Ausdruck "Roter Retter" gesehen, sowohl in einer Kurzgeschichte als auch in Nachrichten (beispielsweise hier). Während ich in politischen Nachrichten noch nachvollziehen ...
13
votes
5answers
1k views

Why is 'Guten Tag' accusative?

Is it just an idiom, or is it a general rule? I'm wishing a good day to someone, so I guess there is some kind of metaphorical motion involved. Would it be similar if I wanted to say "vielen Spaß"?
12
votes
1answer
143 views

Wer ist der “wahre Jacob”?

In einem Brief an Max Born, einen der Gründer der Quantenmechanik, schreibt 1926 Einstein (dem diese Theorie nicht gefiel, obwohl er auch einer deren Gründer war): Die Quantenmechanik ist sehr ...
17
votes
6answers
2k views

“Toi, toi, toi” – was genau bedeutet dieser Ausdruck?

Ich habe gerade "Toi, toi, toi" gehört, und habe keine Ahnung, wie ich das nehmen sollte! Ist es gut? Schlecht? Wenn man im Englischen "Tut, tut, tut..." hört, es ist nicht so prickelnd. Hat dieser ...
17
votes
5answers
472 views

Gibt es einen Unterschied zwischen “Haarspalterei” und “Erbsenzählerei”?

Die beiden Begiffe Haarspalterei und Erbsenzählerei lassen sich auch als Eigenschaften Personen zuschreiben. Er ist ein Haarspalter. Er ist ein Erbsenzähler. Gibt es Unterschiede zwischen ...
8
votes
5answers
609 views

Verbreitung und gefühlte Unhöflichkeit von “Was denn?” im Vergleich zu “Was?” und “Hä?”

Ich stelle immer wieder fest, dass ich, wenn ich etwas akustisch nicht richtig verstanden habe, mit "Was denn?" (*) nachfrage und das auch als einigermaßen höflich empfinde. Allerdings habe ich mir ...
12
votes
4answers
494 views

Expression for someone with very broad and detailed knowledge

Are there any well-known German expressions for someone who is very board and detailed in knowledge? for example: He is a human database
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Woher kommt die Redewendung “Weiß der Geier”?

Wieso Geier? Soviel ich weiß, es gibt keine Geier in Deutschland. Kommt die Redewendung aus Literatur oder der Volkskunde?
9
votes
2answers
283 views

Warum erhalten Zahlwörter manchmal das Suffix “-e”?

Es gibt seltene Varianten, in denen Zahlwörter ein Suffix "-e" erhalten: Sie streckten alle viere von sich. Beim Kegeln fielen alle neune. "Ach, du grüne Neune!" "Wir treffen uns um Zwölfe." ...
9
votes
3answers
516 views

Warum haben Deutsche einen “Vogel”, wenn sie ein wenig verrückt sind?

Woher kommt wohl die Redewendung "Du hast ja einen Vogel!" oder "Der hat eine Meise!" die man hört, wenn jemand eine andere Person (oder deren Idee) für etwas verrückt hält? Hängt auch "jemand ...