0
votes
2answers
384 views

Why do you say Kennenzulernen? [closed]

As far as I know, kennen is to know somebody and lernen means to learn Then why do you use kennenzulernen to say nice to meet?
2
votes
3answers
246 views

Where does the “Infinitiv mit zu” come from? [duplicate]

I was asked by a friend if the "Infinitiv mit zu" specifically come from the Berlin region because most of his friends who use it that way come from that area. Since I wasn't raised in the Berlin ...
1
vote
3answers
923 views

Difference between using the double infinitive or past participle?

For longer sentences with more verbs, it is often hard for a learner to figure out when to use the double infinitive sentence structure and when to use the past participle. For example in the ...
1
vote
2answers
372 views

“um… zu” in “Finding/spending time to learn German”

Sometimes it is hard for me to decide whether to use "zu" or "um... zu". I think in English whether it should be "to" or "in order to", but it's still often hard to distinguish. For example, consider ...
4
votes
1answer
434 views

Infinitive with “zu” after modal verb?

In an exercise, they ask to translate I like to sleep in my bed which I'd translate as Ich mag in meinem Bett schlafen However according to them my translation is wrong, and they give ...
7
votes
1answer
261 views

Comma in infinitive construction

In "Lehr- und Übungsbuch der deutschen Grammatik", I found some sentences: Ich fürchte, dass ich bald entlassen werde. Ich fürchte, bald entlassen zu werden. Sie hofft, dass sie vom Bahnhof ...
5
votes
3answers
894 views

When is 'to' translated with “um zu”, when with “zu”

The infinitve marker "to" can not simply be translated with "zu". Apparently in most instances it translates with "um zu", wheras in other instances "zu" alone is used. 1 "Del" is the key to ...