19
votes
9answers
4k views

How do Germans refer to people without caring about the gender

In German, a noun always has its own gender. However, there is a case I don't know. Suppose that there is a class with many students, both males and females, and then when I want to refer to all ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Demonstrative pronoun: does it have to match the subject? [closed]

I'm a little confused about German grammar, the demonstratives to be specific (this, that, these, those). Does the demonstrative pronoun have to match the subject being described? Example: Would ...
1
vote
3answers
683 views

Why is it “der Bikini”? Shouldn't the noun be feminine?

I can understand that some German nouns (e.g. Mädchen) might just always have been whatever gender the noun is, and the explaintion is lost to the mists of time. But Bikinis were invented in the ...
9
votes
1answer
309 views

Warum heißt es “Ruderin”, nicht “Rudererin”?

Aus den Verben rudern und lehren ergeben sich Tätigkeitsbezeichnungen: Ein Mann ist Ruderer oder Lehrer. Eine Frau ist Ruderin oder Lehrerin. Naiv erwarte ich, dass die weibliche Form Rudererin ...
3
votes
1answer
773 views

How is the gender of new words established?

When words are borrowed into German, how is it decided what gender that word should be? I can think of examples with all three genders: der Latte, die Jeans, das Internet. Are there ever ...
17
votes
3answers
408 views

What gender has a “Virus”?

In German there is some confusion on the gender of "Virus" where both masculine and neuter are used: Das Influenzavirus ändert jährlich seine Oberflächenstruktur. Ich habe mir den Virus im ...
23
votes
4answers
425 views

Why do we have two equally used terms for “toe”?

There are two translations for toe that both are equally used. Both are pronounced almost the same but they have a different gender: der Zeh, m die Zehe, f What is the origin of this ...
74
votes
16answers
8k views

How can I better learn noun genders?

One of the things that I really liked about German, as I was studying it in college, was the very orderly grammar, which actually helped me to understand my native English better. As a non-native ...