Sprachgebrauch - Questions about subtle points of usage of German words or phrases.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
2answers
305 views

Verwendung von “brauchen” als Modalverb und “bräuchte-”

Als ich beim Forschen war, um mehr über den Konjunktiv II zu lernen, um ein Handout zu machen, habe ich in Hammer's German Grammar and Usage gelesen, dass brauchen manchmal als ein starkes Verb ...
2
votes
3answers
135 views

reintun vs. reinmachen

I heard both words used quite often in spoken German in the meaning of "to put something into something". Are these two words identical in meaning and interchangeable or are there any differences in ...
11
votes
4answers
339 views

„Danke“ als Antwort auf eine Ja-Nein-Frage

Auf eine Entscheidungsfrage wie »Möchten Sie etwas trinken?« antworten manche Leute mit »Danke.« oder »Danke, danke.«. Heißt das immer nein, also die Person möchte nichts trinken? Wäre das in diesem ...
2
votes
2answers
883 views

Wann benutzt man “wenn” oder “ob”?

Ich glaube, dass ob wie das englische if ist und wenn wie das englische whether. Also ob mit Kondition, whether in allen anderen Fällen. Ist das richtig? Beispiele Ich weiß nicht, ob ich Zeit habe. ...
6
votes
2answers
112 views

What happens when only the verb is left after a subordinate clause?

Simple example: A1) Der Mann, den wir gestern sahen, rennt. Is that correct with that lone verb at the end or should it better be A2) Der Mann rennt, den wir gestern sahen. another example ...
2
votes
1answer
903 views

Rules for “es geht um”

As I am learning German on my own there are a lot of things I do not fully understand. One of those things is the use of geht um. Which I think it means something like about (it's about). The problem ...
2
votes
2answers
191 views

Usage of the verb “gehen”

Gehen actually means 'to go'. The use of gehen is a semi-auxiliary in colloquial. It expresses a possibility and the infinitive has passive force. Die Uhr geht zu reparieren. which means 'The ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

Arbeitsumfeld ist deutschsprachig

Klingt der Satz, "Mein Arbeitsumfeld ist deutschsprachig" so, als ob das Umfeld selbst Deutsch spricht (will ich nämlich nicht sagen), oder als ob an meinem Arbeitsplatz nur Deutsch gesprochen wird?
4
votes
2answers
959 views

Usage of “etwas” and “einige”

I read in the book that etwas means some. Ich brauche etwas frisches Fleisch. Er hat etwas Geld. There is also another determiner that is einige. It also means some. Vor ...
3
votes
1answer
363 views

Can we use “wissen lassen”?

I was thinking about how to say "I will let you know". The first sentence that comes to mind is Ich werde dich wissen lassen. Grammatically this looks fine. However, I feel a bit strange about ...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

Usage of “aber”, “jedoch” and “allerdings”

What is the difference between allerdings, aber and jedoch? I looked them up in the dictionary and all three mean 'but'. Could anyone tell me how they're used in a sentence?
5
votes
4answers
581 views

How to translate “to make no sense”?

How would you say "to make no sense" in German? I've seen uses with machen and haben: Das macht keinen Sinn. Es hat keinen Sinn, mit Ihnen zu streiten.
5
votes
1answer
601 views

Usage of “in der Tat”

I learned from a dictionary that the phrase "In der Tat" means "indeed". Can I use this phrase as a positive response to a statement? A: Heute ist es so kalt! B: In der Tat! or can I only ...
2
votes
1answer
122 views

nur vs. nur noch

Is there a rule that tells me when to us "nur noch" over "nur"? Are they interchangeable? For example, consider the following two sentences: Heute sehen wir uns nur noch selten. Heute sehen wir uns ...
7
votes
4answers
304 views

Confused by a sentence using “erleben”

Recently I found the following sentence at the end of a novel which I was reading in translation (i.e. it’s the German translation of an English-language novel). Dann mache ich mir eine Liste im ...
6
votes
2answers
881 views

Menschen vs Leute

Is the same to say Menschen and Leute? When are they exchangeable? I've heard that if you know the people you use one of this words, but I don't know which. (And I don't know if what I've heard is ...
0
votes
2answers
388 views

Wie kommst du zu? / Wie kommst du in?

Is there any difference between Wie kommst du zu? and Wie kommst du in? Is any of them more formal? More common? I could think that it depends on the object, but I've seen them both very often, even ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Ich meine == I mean?

Today in my German class, I subconsciously said "I mean" and when I apologized for changing to English, my teacher said "Almost, you also say 'ich meine'" in German. Is this expression used so common ...
6
votes
2answers
720 views

When to use articles as in “Was für” versus “Was für ein”?

If you say Was für einen Tee möchten Sie? (with article after für), why do you say Was für Kleidung trägst du am Wochenende? and not Was für eine Kleidung trägst du am Wochenende?
6
votes
2answers
328 views

“Frühstück” or “Morgenessen”

I took German in Highschool about 20 years ago, so I quite possibly have forgotten this, but I thought I had learned “breakfast” as “Morgenessen” just like lunch is “Mittagessen” but I’ve recently ...
2
votes
2answers
359 views

What's the opposite of “jawohl”?

I understand that in military or police or some other formal situations "jawohl" is the positive response to a command, much like "yes sir" in English; but how does a soldier say "no sir"? In ...
4
votes
1answer
221 views

Schriftliche Höflichkeitsformel – Du oder du [duplicate]

In einem E-Mail an meinen Kunden schreibe ich immer Du/Dich/Dir (mit einem grossen D). Zum Beispiel: Bei Fragen stehen wir Dir gerne zur Verfügung. Als ich mit Deutsch in meinem Job begonnen ...
0
votes
2answers
144 views

On verbal parentheses [closed]

I know that one of the peculiarities of the German language is this thing called verbal parentheses, which extends all the way from the auxiliary verb to the unonjugated form of the verb. What I ...
7
votes
3answers
120 views

What is the accurate translation of “stands to reason” within a “logical” context?

Taking the following example: It stands to reason that most people will not buy a new car if they don't think they can pay for it. The "stands to reason" could be replaced by "logical" as in: ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

“Schönes Wochenende” versus “Schönen Wochenende”

Is there any preference to using "Schönes Wochenende" or "Schönen Wochenende" as a parting statement? Are they both allowed, or is there a preference for one over the other? Different people have told ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Difference between “Kind”and “Jugend” [duplicate]

I am interested in not only the literal but the figurative differences between "Kind" and "Jugend" Thanks for your input!
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Usage of “zwar”

Can anyone explain how the word zwar is generally used? I see it a lot and it doesn't seem like it usually translates very well into English, if at all. Here's an example sentence: Frage: Hat ...
5
votes
2answers
165 views

Anything better than “weltweit” for “All over the world”?

I would like to say something like, "You have really lived all over the world!" ...like in response to someone saying they've been to many different countries. I did a Google search for this and ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Correct usage of “sogar” and “einmal” to mean “even”

I would appreciate any clarification on the correct usage of sogar and einmal as translations of the English word "even" when used in the following sense: He didn't drink anything...not even the ...
7
votes
1answer
183 views

When to use possessive pronouns vs. dative pronoun + definite article

German uses a reflexive dative pronoun and a regular definite article in many places where English would use a possessive pronoun. For example: I broke my leg. Ich habe mir das Bein gebrochen. ...
11
votes
2answers
735 views

Difference between “Es sind” and “Es gibt” for asserting existence of something

In English we say There are... and I know that I've seen es gibt used in German. I've also seen es sind. Are these phrases identical? There are many flowers in the garden = Es gibt viele Blumen ...
-6
votes
1answer
274 views

Can someone give the examples ( few sentences ) with words: da, deutete, dabei? [closed]

I read a book on german and meet these words very often, but the context still not clearly for me. So I want to see a few examples with these 3 words with translation. upd As I read a book further ...
4
votes
2answers
202 views

What is the proper use of the word “bang?”

The original context is "Bang fleht ein liebkranker Mann." (Viljaslied, Die Lustige Witwe). I once wrote a poem beginning, Ich schaue dich so gerne an. Du liesst mich immer so BANG. Bang is ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What's the difference between “jedenfalls” and “auf jeden Fall”?

They mean the same thing, I think, but are used differently? When can I use one, and when can I use the other?
6
votes
2answers
191 views

Konditionalsätze mit “würde”?

Im Englischen machen viele non-native speaker gerne den Fehler im if-clause "would" zu nutzen. Meine Frage: Ist dies nicht auch im Deutschen falsch? Wenn ich die Zeit hätte, würde ich mehr lesen. ...
1
vote
1answer
537 views

Modal verbs: preterite or perfect?

I was told that while speaking people generally use perfect instead of preterite. Is it also common for modal verbs? Which is used in which cases? Ich konnte ... or Ich habe gekonnt ...
5
votes
1answer
290 views

War “auf meinem Mist gewachsen” ursprünglich positiv oder negativ belegt?

Der Ausdruck "Das ist auf meinem Mist gewachsen" wird heutzutage m.W. eher negativ aufgenommen und häufiger als eine leichte Entschuldigung verwendet. Vermutlich liegt das an der negativen Wahrnehmung ...
6
votes
3answers
331 views

„Welcher“ zur Kennzeichnung explikativer Relativsätze?

Beim Meditieren über diese Frage ist mir eingefallen, dass ich welcher u. Ä. manchmal als Relativpronomen nutze, um zu betonen, dass der Relativsatz explikativ ist. Ein Beispiel: A) Derjenige ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

How to use perfect in this sentence

I have a problem understanding how to use perfect in the following sentence: Ich bin mit dem Bus in das Stadtzentrum gefahren. I know we are supposed to use the auxiliary verb haben in perfect ...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

Bindestrich zur besseren Lesbarkeit [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Zusammengesetzes Wort: Bindestrich oder nicht? Ich möchte das Wort webtechnologielastig lesbarer Gestalten. Dazu habe ich die Alternativen Webtechnologie-lastig ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “ändern” and “verändern”?

I'm still confused about the difference between ändern and verändern. I have read something about ändern only being used with small changes and verändern when something changes totally. But where ...
7
votes
1answer
463 views

Gebräuchlichkeit von Wörter mit und ohne “-s” am Ende (Beispiel: “nochmal / nochmals”)

Es gibt einige Wörter im Deutschen, die am Wortende gegebenenfalls mit einem -s geschrieben werden können, wo es aber auch durchaus weggelassen werden kann. Historisch gibt es viele Wörter, die einst ...
6
votes
2answers
505 views

Welche Präposition gehört zu “Exposition”?

Wenn ich einem Stoff (z.B. einem Umweltgift) ausgesetzt bin, ist das dann eine Exposition durch diesen Stoff? Oder was nimmt man da?
9
votes
4answers
144 views

“Ich bin Neurobiologe” oder “Ich bin EIN Neurobiologe”?

Ich muss gleich vorweg sagen, dass ich selber kein Muttersprachler bin. Jedoch finde ich die Konstrukte wie ich bin ein (|Beruf- bzw. Statusbezeichnung|) etwas unnatürlich und empfinde sie als ...
3
votes
1answer
66 views

Kann “schlechthin” auch mit unbestimmtem Artikel stehen?

In einer Kommentardiskussion zu einer anderen Frage hat sich eine weitere interessante Fragestellung ergeben, nämlich ob schlechthin immer mit betontem bestimmtem Artikel steht oder auch mit ...
4
votes
3answers
308 views

Ist “exorbitant” heute noch gebräuchlich?

Vor kurzem bin ich in einem Bericht über Lance Armstrong über das Wort "exorbitant" gestolpert, das man u. a. mit "außergewöhnlich" gleichsetzen kann. Ich habe dieses Wort nur früher gehört, heute ...
4
votes
3answers
110 views

Was versteht man unter einem “maßlosen Sinn”?

Ich habe bei dict.leo.org gerade (sinnfrei) nach den englichen Übersetzungen für Sinn gesucht und bin dabei auf etwas gestoßen, das ich erst nur komisch zu lesen fand. Und beim Sinnen über den Sinn ...
5
votes
5answers
342 views

Adapting a Quote in Old English Style

I'd like to give someone a gift (who speaks German, and is also a fountain pen user) and include a quote from S.B.R.E. Brown (podcast here) written down with my own calligraphy. The problem is that ...
6
votes
7answers
9k views

What is the accurate translation of “Best Regards” to finish a letter?

To finish up a letter addressed to a client, I use Best Regards, followed by my signature. I've looked around for a direct translation, and came up with: ...
9
votes
3answers
839 views

Usage of Perfekt and Präteritum in the spoken language

I have read the question When to use Perfekt and Präteritum? but it doesn't answer my question. I am looking for a rule for beginner / intermediate level learners which tells when to use Perfekt or ...