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11

Ich danke dir. is the only correct version. Danken takes the dative case. You will never hear otherwise. I would recommend to forget about the concept of direct and indirect object; or better, you should realize that the definitions of direct and indirect object in German and English are not identical. Neither is the use. So just because some verb ...


10

Aufmachen can be used as both, a transitive and an intransitive verb. So there you can aufmachen something but you can also just aufmachen. It is the same for the English verb to open. Er macht den Laden auf. (acc) He opens the store. Der Laden macht um 6 auf. The store opens at 6.


10

Emanuel already mentioned that Ich danke dir is the correct way of saying I thank you. I just want to tell you how you can simply answer such a question with help of some online tools. Unfortunately, only a few sources mention the necessary information explicitly and, if they do, this information is sometimes a little hidden. Starting with Duden, you'll ...


9

In your example, the grammatical case of the noun „Kino“ depends on the preposition „in“. The difficulty here is that „in“ may require dative or accusative, depending on the sense of the sentence: If „in“ indicates a direction/movement, you'll have to use accusative: „Wir gehen in das Kino“ (or, commonly, „ins Kino“ - merging „in“ and „das“). „Wir ...


8

Es gibt einen Fehler auf dem Tisch. Es, although an impersonal is still the subject acting on the object (the mistake). Imagine if in English you said It gives a mistake on the table. the mistake is still being given by the it. On the other hand, if you said Es ist ja niemand da. then it's niemand and not niemanden because sein is a ...


8

Beide Varianten sind korrekt. Sie haben allerdings eine unterschiedliche Bedeutung. Ich habe Lust, nur in der Nähe zu fahren. Hier bedeutet "in der Nähe" eine begrenzte, statische Umgebung, etwas wie eine Zonenangabe. Wenn du "in der Nähe" zum Beispiel mit "im Schulhof" austauschst, wird klar, dass es sich um eine Ortsergänzung im 3. Fall (Dativ, ...


8

There are very few verbs that can take two accusative objects. jemanden etwas angehen (limitations with regards to what can be used instead of "etwas") jemanden etwas lehren jemanden etwas nennen/heißen jemanden etwas fragen There might be a couple more, but that's pretty much it.


7

Yes, both sources are correct. The regular comparative is formed with the ending -er, so "neuer" is the comparative of "neu": neu, neuer, am neuesten Then we have the endings in the declension of adjectives, and yes, for the indefinite article, the nominative ending is also -er: ein neuer Wagen Yes, it sounds confusing, but we all will just have ...


7

The predicate is not bare sein but groß sein or, more general, adjective sein. The element that is connected by the pure copula is in fact the adjective and not the measurement. There is no real logical reason for the measurement to be in accusative case. It could be Dative as well. But it answers the question "how?" so it must be in some case. "[Wie] ...


7

Let's try to collect some of the meanings, many of which are figurative. (I don't mind to add anything, please let me know through comments.) Aus dem Küchenfenster schaut man direkt auf die Kirche. From the kitchen, one can see the church. As has been pointed out, this does not necessarily imply that one sees the church from above. Nevertheless, this ...


6

"Ich danke dir" = "I give thanks to you", not "I thank you". Maybe danke is acting like the accusative and the verb and dir is the dative. "Helfen Sie mir" = "You give help to me", not "You help me". Likewise, maybe helfen is acting like the accusative and the verb and mir is the dative. Ich = nominative danke = verb action and the sense of "giving a ...


6

Superman was asked for an autograph for Mary. He said: "I only do this for money." Superman wurde um ein Autogramm für Mary gebeten. Er sagte: „Ich mach das nur gegen Geld.“ The for in the second sentence can also be translated by für: […] Er sagte: „Ich mach das nur für Geld.“


6

It just so happens that the accusative declination of the pronoun ich is also the reflexive pronoun for ich. The verb which you and many other German-learners perceive to be bedanken is actually sich bedanken, indicating it is reflexive and requires a reflexive pronoun. "Ich bedanke mich" implies that you are saying "I thank you," even though the ...


6

I think what confuses you here is seeing the dative case as simply meaning indirect object. In Proto-Indo-European (PIE, the theoretical language which all European languages evolved from) there were eight cases, including the four which remain in modern German; one of the others was the locative case, used for marking the location where something takes ...


6

When in is used to give a place or a time as answers to questions with wann or wo you must use the Dative. When it is used to give a direction (as in the answer to the question with wohin) it stands with Accusative. In the question Wer macht Parties in der Freizeit? the expression in der Freizeit specifies the time, so the Dative is used.


5

The key thing to understand is that it doesn't matter whether there is movement involved or not. What matters is the question the particular prepositional phrase is answering. When you talk about location there are 3 possible options: destination current location origin So the part with the preposition can be the answer to one of the following three ...


5

Ich werde einen Brief an meinen Vater schreiben. Correct. You could also shorten it to Ich werde meinem Vater einen Brief schreiben. Ich möchte einen Mantel meinem Bruder kaufen. I'm not sure if this is grammatically correct, but it's awkward to the point of confusing a native speaker. You'd rearrange it to Ich möchte meinem Bruder einen Mantel ...


5

Your sentence is fine, so yes, the object can be in the first position. Note, however: The sentence is not exactly equivalent to the English one (a short one would be einen kurzen, not einen anderen, and you have left out the second our as well). The result sounds quite elevated, which is mainly due to the chiasmus, I think. Normal word order would be one ...


5

Wann macht der Supermarkt auf? is written with Supermarkt in the nominative case as indicated by the determinative der. A simple test as to why this is the case would be to ask: What (or who) is opening? Answer: The super market. Nominative case nouns represent subjects of sentences or in vernacular: "the who or what, which is doing the action". ...


5

Also, der Duden schreibt zum Verb nennen, dass es im Aktiv ein Aukkusativobjekt und ein Objektprädikativ im Akkustiv verlangt. Im Beispielsatz ist das Akkusativobjekt mich und der Objektprädikativ ist der Name (egal welcher). Zum Thema Nomenflektion stellt der Duden fest, dass es eine Tendenz gibt, im Akkusativ nicht zu flektieren so kein Artikel ...


5

Many location-related prepositions go with the Dativ when a state/position is expressed, but with the Akkusativ when related to a direction or movement. An is among them, in is also quite prominent. There is an interesting overview here (even although it is from an Austrian site!) (pdf). So when you express where to (or to whom) the letter should be sent, ...


4

Ich danke Dir This is always correct, and "Ich danke Dich" is always incorrect. The receiver of something is always in Dativ. Note that "Dativ" comes from Latin do, dare, dedi, datus, which means primarily to give. So Dativ is literally the case you use to describe the act of giving to someone.


4

What you mean is Sie halten Johannes, den Ingenieur, für den wichtigsten Fachmann ihrer Firma. Also in this sense we have an object, which requires the accusative. Only the subject can be a nominative. The term "Johannes, der Ingenieur" can, of course, be used in the nominative case, like Johannes, der Ingenieur, ist der wichtigste Fachmann der ...


4

Immer is simply an adverb and has no bearing as to case. With immer, you're saying that one should always have a penguin in the house, without it, you're simply saying one should have a penguin in the house. Akkusativ is used because haben is not a dative verb, and the penguin is the direct object, therefore it should be in the accusative case. The noun ...


4

It does not depend on "immer" but on "sollte ... haben" (should have) Man sollte einen Pinguin im Haus haben. Man sollte {wen oder was?} im Haus haben. "immer" is just a nice add-on: without "immer": Man sollte einen Pinguin im Haus haben. You should have a penguin at home. with "immer": Man sollte immer einen Pinguin im Haus haben. ...


4

Der Dativ im zweiten Teil kommt von "geben". Hier eine normalisierte Version. Wir (Nom.) geben unserem Hund (Dat.) Fressen (Akk.)


4

Es handelt sich hierbei um das Objektsprädikativ, dessen Funktion es ist, das Akkusativobjekt genauer zu bestimmen. Es ist somit ein Prädikativum, genau wie das Prädikatsnomen, welches bekanntlich das Subjekt genauer bestimmt. Es ist folglich das Komplement zu einem sonst unvollständigen Satz. Vergleiche: Vollständiger Satz, braucht keint Komplement ...


4

You are right. Both der Oma are in dative case; both ihre Brille in accusative.


4

dict.cc uses jdn to indicate accusative (for example, see dict.cc on "lehren") and jdmfor dative (see dict.cc on "ausweichen", e.g.). But the indicator may be missing, cf. dict.cc on "verzeihen". Often, the example sentences are giving a hint which grammatical case to use. There's also an explanation of the abbreviations used (but this tells only that jdn ...


4

Half of the answer has been given (jdm [or jmdm] Vs. jdn[or jmdn]). Here two other points to consider. First, the answer is a little grammar as well. Not all verbs have a fixed case; for instance waschen: Ich wasche etwas Akk.. but Ich wasche mir Dat. die Hände. So you might have to do the analysis by yourself. Second, etw and sich are also ...



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