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It always helps visualizing what the words really mean or where they come from. And if you do that, it is relatively easy to see that "erinnern" describes the process of "going into oneself" — in order to get something which is stored there, but not directly relating to the memories themselves. "Erinnern" is about handling yourself, not your memories, thus ...


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I guess that's part of learning a language. It's not you who decide whether the grammar makes sense, but in cases, you have to learn rules which will contradict your intuition. That said, the property of verbs being reflexive it's not something preserved after you translate. To sum things up, you have to learn when a verb is reflexive. If you write just ...


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In this case, the German translations of "to remember" and "to feel" are reflexive: to remember [sth.] – sich [an etwas] erinnern to feel [well] – sich [gut] fühlen So that in fact, dich and euch are reflexive pronouns (which in turn behave like accusative personal pronouns). As a consequence, you need those pronouns for the verbs to ...



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