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3

Even longer answer than Ingmar’s long one: In German noun phrases (aka. nominal groups etc.), all parts have to agree in gender, number and case. In nominative (R:S:E = m:n:f) and accusative (N:S:E), one of the attributes or the noun itself has to be inflected to show the gender of the phrase. The gender is determined by the nominal lexeme’s linguistic ...


7

In the question it is assumed that there are two correct forms for one adjective. But since adjectives have to be declined in German, it is even "worse" and the number of correct forms is much bigger than two. Let's start with the obvious forms: Adjectives are declined with respect to the three grammatical genders (male, female, neuter); singular and plural ...


11

Short answer: der Deutsche Schäferhund, ein Deutscher Schäferhund Long answer: It depends; "deutsch" is an adjective in this case, and German adjectives need to be inflected. Inflection is still done the same when adjectives were capitalized for becoming a part of the name (Deutscher Schäferhund). Singular Nom. der deutsche Hund, ein deutscher Hund Gen. ...



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