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Additionally to the other usages explained in @thekeyofgbs answer, the wo- compunds can also be used to replace the relative pronoun in sentences. Das Buch, über das wir heute sprechen = Das Buch, worüber wir heute sprechen Das Handy, nach dem ich suche = Das Handy, wonach ich suche


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The is no overlap with spüren (similar to percept or sense), which as a transitive verb would require an object. There is just a small overlap with fühlen, which can be used also transitively (then see spüren) or reflexively as in er fühlte sich schlecht. While fühlen is an up-to-date verb and can be flexibly used, zumute sein is dated, seldom used and ...


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Can't be correct. »Zumute« is an adjective, »feel« is a verb. So »zumute« does not mean »feel«. »Zumute« is something that you can be (»mir ist heute nicht nach Scherzen zumute) or that you can become (»Mir wird ganz seltsam zumute). Be aware, that you use dative »mir ist/wird«, not nominative »ich bin/werde«. »Ich bin zumute« and »Ich werde zumute« are ...


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Du sitzt einem kleinen Missverständnis auf. Otto war draußen gewesen. Dann ging er rein. Nun ist er drinnen. Dein Buch hat jeweils eine Vergangenheitsform (Mit Adverbiale des Ortes) gebildet, und dann die Bewegung von dieser Vergangenheit weg in die Gegenwart beschrieben. Du siehst also das rein neben draußen, weil Otto draußen gewesen sein muss, ...


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Both are grammatically correct, but the emphasis is different, as pointed out by Wrzlprmft. The result is that to me, at least, the two questions are quite different. Kann ich in Berlin etwas kaufen? This question asks whether it is possible to buy something in Berlin at all (emphasis is on Berlin). A possible answer would be "No, since the great comet ...


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Both word orders are correct and only slightly differ in emphasis: Whatever you put first in this case, is slightly more focussed by the question (at least that’s my impression, even native speakers can disagree over this). Some examples in context: Ich kann in Hamburg, München und Köln einen Hut kaufen. Aber: Kann ich in Berlin einen Hut kaufen? ...


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los is a regular adjective meaning off (in the sense of unleashed or detached). The basic idiomatic expression using los is the following sentence: Etwas ist los. Something is unleashed/moving (figuratively: going on). los does not become an adverb here as the sentence is simply assigning the attribute los to the subject etwas. los is an adjective ...


5

When you write a letter to a friend in German, you start it like this: Lieber Hans, wie geht es dir? Wir haben uns lange nicht gesehen … in English: Dear Hans, how are you? We didn't meet for a long time... Here you could replace »lieb« by »geschätzt« (I guess its »valued« in English, but I'm not absolutely sure): (ger) Geschätzter ...


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lieber is not only the comparative of gerne - first of all it is the comparative of lieb (Duden entry). That is what it is used for in your example sentence. So the second part of your sentence translates to ..., the nicer (or dearer) the guests. It is probably worth noting that lieb in its adjective form Jemand/Etwas ist lieb. ...



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