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9

los is a regular adjective meaning off (in the sense of unleashed or detached). The basic idiomatic expression using los is the following sentence: Etwas ist los. Something is unleashed/moving (figuratively: going on). los does not become an adverb here as the sentence is simply assigning the attribute los to the subject etwas. los is an adjective ...


5

When you write a letter to a friend in German, you start it like this: Lieber Hans, wie geht es dir? Wir haben uns lange nicht gesehen … in English: Dear Hans, how are you? We didn't meet for a long time... Here you could replace »lieb« by »geschätzt« (I guess its »valued« in English, but I'm not absolutely sure): (ger) Geschätzter ...


6

lieber is not only the comparative of gerne - first of all it is the comparative of lieb (Duden entry). That is what it is used for in your example sentence. So the second part of your sentence translates to ..., the nicer (or dearer) the guests. It is probably worth noting that lieb in its adjective form Jemand/Etwas ist lieb. ...


0

The given explanations may or may not be grammatically correct but they are purely academic. No native german speaker would ever say "Es tut mir Leid, dass Du mit mir nicht kommen kannst." The "nicht" needs to go before "mit mir", everything else is plain wrong (in the sense of "nobody uses it that way"). Also, this wrong order of words is not suitable for ...


4

I would translate the sentences as followed: Es tut mir Leid, dass Du mit mir nicht kommen kannst. I'm sorry that you can't cum with me. Es tut mir Leid, dass Du nicht mit mir kommen kannst. I'm sorry that you can't come with me.


4

There are three different verbs to think of here: mit jemandem kommen=come with somebody The mit jemandem is an obligatory object here. kommen=come, arrive, … Has no obligatory objects. kommen=cum, get to orgasm Has no obligatory objects. Negation usually encompasses a verb with all its obligatory objects. So for the first verb the usually negated ...


5

Es tut mir Leid, dass Du mit mir nicht kommen kannst. What I understand is that this sentence really underlines "mit mir" (with me). The person is really sorry that the other can't come with him. So the other person has to go with someone else he doesn't like for example. Es tut mir Leid, dass Du nicht mit mir kommen kannst. This is the general ...



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