Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Gerne is proper. Gern is dialect. In the Basel area I have only heard "Gern"... but they drop the final "-e" on most things in Baseldütsh (e.g I have never heard "Schade" only "Schad"). In Schwabenländle (BW) I have heard "Gern" in sentences and "Gerne" only when used alone as a single word answer (e.g. Möchtest du xxx... Gerne...).


2

"fast ununterbrochen" definitely modifies the verb as an adverb, not the noun as an adjective, so it has nothing to with the noun phrase and is irrelevant to the problem. The answer to your question is simply no. There are no German constructions that correspond to "many a day" or "good enough a try", i.e. inflected adjectives preceding their neighbour ...


2

No, the adjective cannot precede the article. Since I am not a grammarian I might just not be able to think of an example, but I think the fact that these constructions surprised me when I first encountered them in English is a good indication that they do not have German counterparts. And as you already noticed “fast ununterbrochen” in the first example ...


4

Most of the time, irgend- corresponds to no matter who/which/where/how/... or I don't know the details. E. g., irgendjemand, irgendwer -> some/any person (I don't know or don't care who) irgendwo -> at some/any place, no matter where irgendein Auto -> some/any car, no matter which one irgendwelche Insekten -> some/any insects, no matter which kind ...


5

Irgend is used to reinforce uncertainty similar to some/any. Examples Hat irgendwer meine Tasche gesehen? Has anyone seen my bag? Kannst du es irgendwo sehen? Can you see it anywhere? Sie suchen irgendwas. They're looking for something. Regarding the differences you're interested in: irgendwas and etwas are synonyms. ...


2

Das darum in deinem Beispiel gehört zum zweiten Hauptsatz und kann in verschiedenen Positionen vorkommen: Darum habe ich den Rasen nicht mähen können. Ich habe darum den Rasen nicht mähen können. Ich habe den Rasen darum nicht mähen können. Jeder dieser Sätze ist vollständig und kann für sich allein stehen. Im Vergleich zwischen dem ersten Satz und ...


3

„Darum“ ist nicht als Konjunktion klassifiziert, weil es keine Konjunktion ist. Es handelt sich in diesem Fall um ein Konjunktionaladverb. In deinem Beispielsatz steht das Konjunktionaladverb „darum“ im Vorfeld: Der Rasenmäher ist kaputt gegangen, darum habe ich den Rasen nicht mähen können. Man kann es aber auch ins Mittelfeld verschieben: Der ...


7

Wenn es eine Konjunktion wäre, wäre die Wortstellung anders. Beispiel "denn", mit Nummerierung: Der Rasenmäher ist kaputt gegangen, und [0] ich [1] habe [2] den Rasen nicht mähen können. Der Rasen ist sehr hoch gewachsen, denn [0] ich [1] habe [2] den Rasen nicht mähen können. Das Verb steht an zweiter Stelle, die Konjunktion steht "zwischen den ...



Top 50 recent answers are included