Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Ich hoffe, es ist in Ordnung, wenn ich auf Deutsch antworte, denn es ist meine Muttersprache, und darin kann ich mich besser ausdrücken. Grüß Gott Ich bin ein Atheist und ich lebe in Wien. Ich mag den Gruß "Grüß Gott" auch nicht und das aus demselben Grund. Aber ich benutze den Gruß trotzdem, denn hier in Österreich denkt kaum jemand über den religiösen ...


18

“Guten Tag” is the conventional alternative. It may sound a little formal but it’s really not. Personally I prefer a hearty “Hallo” (or “Moin” in the north) but this is generally not seen as very polite and should be avoided if you don’t know your interlocutor and don’t want to give offence. In particular, answering “Grüß Gott” with “Hallo” is certainly a ...


17

The "Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache" is both an awesome resource and dangerously fun to browse - I've wasted hours there. They have the following distribution of the synonymous words "benützen" and "benutzen":


17

"Guten Morgen" (any time before noon) "Guten Tag" (any time between mid-morning and 6 pm) "Guten Abend" (any time after 6 pm) Times above are a rough estimate. People don't get huffed if you're a minute or two early/late (unlike in English speaking countries, where people feel a need to apologize if they use "good morning" at two minutes past noon). ...


16

Unter Klappe verstehen Österreicher die Durchwahl einer Telefonnummer. Das ist normalerweise eine kurze Gruppe von zwei bis maximal vier Ziffern, die der Hauptnummer eines Anschlusses hinzugefügt werden muss, um die gesuchte Person direkt zu erreichen. Beispiel: Unsere allgemeine Firmennummer ist +43 01 998877. Meine Klappe ist 321. Die Person ist ...


12

The correct form is Es ist sich gestern nicht mehr ausgegangen. But note that this is very colloquial and probably not understood outside of Bavaria and Austria.


12

Das Suffix -i im Bairischen entspricht dem Präfix "hin-" im Hochdeutschen. Es handelt sich dabei um eine Bewegung vom Standpunkt des Sprechers weg: Ich gehe hinauf = I geh auffi Ich gehe hinaus = I geh aussi Ich gehe hinunter = I geh obi Ich gehe hinein = I geh eini Ich gehe nach vorne (Sprecher steht hinter dem Angesprochenen) = I geh firi Das Suffix -a ...


12

Ich komme aus der Stadt Salzburg. Wir sagen im Dialekt meist Soizbuag Personen aus Salzburg heissen Soizbuaga das g wird gesprochen. Vorsicht: Die Stadt Salzburg trägt den selben Namen wie das umgebende Bundesland Salzburg. Das kann zu Verwechslungen führen.


12

This heavily depends on the workplace. There are a lot of offices where not a single word is uttered in the toilet, then there are others where lengthy conversations from stall to stall are common. Also, the relationship to your boss plays a role, obviously. So: When in doubt, keep silent. Repeat their greeting if there is any.


12

Eva reichte Adam im Paradies einen Apfel. Das ist der Paradiesapfel. So bezeichnete man früher auch besonders auffallend rote Äpfel. Das »Paradies« (i-e) hieß aber auch »Paradeis« (e-i). Paradeiser Als dann Kolumbus Amerika entdeckt hat, kamen kurz danach viele neue Früchte nach Europa. Unter anderem eine Frucht, die einem Apfel recht ähnlich sah, und ...


12

Tomate geht laut verschiedenen Quellen auf den aztekischen Namen zurück der entweder als tomatlDuden,Grimm (green husk tomato) oder xitomatlWikipedia (red tomato) angegeben wird. Ähnlich wie bei Kakao (cacao / cacahuatl) wurde hier nur der ursprüngliche Name ein wenig "aussprechbarer".


10

The maps shown by the Atlas der deutschen Sprache follow closely the Speyer Line, a line separating german dialects from middle Germany and southern Germany (Upper German / Oberdeutsche Dialekte): Image source: Wikimedia This line is related to the Benrath Line further north where the linguistic separation of High German (south) and Low German (north) ...


10

It is no problem to use this sentence, because it is absolutely correct. The sentence ... Ich weiß es nicht mehr genau. ... is an absolutely correct German sentence. There is nothing wrong with it. The meaning is, that you knew it exactly some time ago, but since then you have forgotten some details. So you still remember, but not exactly.


9

beh. konz. = behördlich konzessionierte(r) Jemand ist behördlich konzessioniert, wenn er eine behördliche Genehmigung zur Ausübung eines Gewerbes hat.


8

Keinesfalls spricht man es als CH aus! Im lokalen Dialekt/den lokalen Dialekten gibt es unterschiedliche Klangfärbungen für das S, eine Verzerrung von Salz zu Soiz und eine von Burg zu Buag, die unterschiedlichst kombiniert werden. Das G war meiner Auffassung nach eigentlich das einzige was jeder Landesbewohner gleich ausspricht. Ein gutes Hörbeispiel ist ...


8

Use the same greeting you would use otherwise, or none at all. (Perhaps not "Mahlzeit", I agree. Certainly not "Servus" unless you are "duzing" your boss.) Notwhing wrong with Grüß Gott, even in front of the stalls.


8

Ja, das ist österreichischer (Wiener) Dialekt. Die Magistratsabteilung 48 (=MA 48), jener Teil der Wr. Stadtverwaltung der für die Abfallbeseitigung verantwortlich ist, hat immer wieder mehr oder weniger originelle Werbungen. Auf den Mistkübeln (Abfallbehältern) finden sich Slogans wie "Für jeden Dreck zu haben", "Gebaut nach dem Reinheitsgebot von 2009" ...


7

There would be another alternative. Habe die Ehre It is an older but still used form in Austria. It can be used to say Hello and Good bye. Younger people often use a derived version to greet each other. Dere


7

Further north, you can also use Moin, or Moinmoin. It's fun to say, perfectly polite, quite common, and somewhat disarming.


7

Germany united very late in history. There are volumes of books about what happened between ~1800 (when Germany consisted of a plethora of small kingdoms, duchies, free citys, and other entities) and 1918, when there was, for the first time, a united german nation. (And it wasn't even clear until after WW1 if Austria should be a state of its own or a part of ...


6

Das Wort speiben (dialektal für speien) wird in Österreich (außer Vorarlberg), Bayern und Südtirol umgangssprachlich für sich übergeben verwendet. Wikipedia führt das Wort in der Liste der Austriazismen. Für Österreich gibt es diese Karte, die anzeigt, wo das Wort verwendet wird: Die Herkunft: aus dem mittelhochdeutschen spī(w)en, althochdeutsch ...


6

I generally discourage religious phrases, but "Grüß Gott" has really lost its religious meaning and is used by most atheists (with some exceptions, of course) because of the dominant geographical meaning. Note that you can get through the day with the acceptable "Guten Morgen!", "Mahlzeit!", "Schönen Abend!". but not everyone likes "Mahlzeit" because ...


6

Hello, I'm looking for polite alternatives to the omnipresent Grüß Gott in Austria/Bavaria. I'd say there isn't an alternative on the same level of formality. "Servus" is an informal alternative but there are many situations where it's not appropriate. "Guten Tag" is certainly not an option. Using it expresses your unwillingness to accept local ...


6

Der erste Monat eines Jahres heißt in Österreich Jänner. Und zu Jänner passt Feber besser als Februar. Tatsächlich kenne ich "Feber" aber nur aus der Aufzählung von Monatsnamen: Jänner, Feber, März, April, ... Diese Aufzählungs-Variante mit Feber ist meiner Beobachtung nach in Österreich üblicher als diese: Jänner, Februar, März, April, ... In ...


6

In addition to Guntram's answer I'd like to point you to the years 1867–1871, the North German Confederation and the Austro-Prussian war. A moment in history where you can see the line and a possible answer to your question. The Austro-Prussian War or Seven Weeks' War was a war fought in 1866 between the German Confederation under the leadership of the ...


6

Die in Österreich übliche Formulierung „die DVD gibt es um zehn Euro“ entspricht der in Deutschland vorherrschenden Formulierung „die DVD gibt es für zehn Euro.“ Zum Verbreitungsgebiet dieser Ausdrücke gibt es eine Karte im Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache:


5

I was born in the city of Kiel in the north, and have been living some time in Karlsruhe in the south. I made it a point to answer "Grüß Gott" (a typically southern greeting) with a stereotypical northern german "Moin Moin" (related to dutch "mooi moin", Schönen/Guten Tag). Delivered with the proper grin it works very well: It also switches their response ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible