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18

“Guten Tag” is the conventional alternative. It may sound a little formal but it’s really not. Personally I prefer a hearty “Hallo” (or “Moin” in the north) but this is generally not seen as very polite and should be avoided if you don’t know your interlocutor and don’t want to give offence. In particular, answering “Grüß Gott” with “Hallo” is certainly a ...


17

Ich hoffe, es ist in Ordnung, wenn ich auf Deutsch antworte, denn es ist meine Muttersprache, und darin kann ich mich besser ausdrücken. Grüß Gott Ich bin ein Atheist und ich lebe in Wien. Ich mag den Gruß "Grüß Gott" auch nicht und das aus demselben Grund. Aber ich benutze den Gruß trotzdem, denn hier in Österreich denkt kaum jemand über den religiösen ...


17

"Guten Morgen" (any time before noon) "Guten Tag" (any time between mid-morning and 6 pm) "Guten Abend" (any time after 6 pm) Times above are a rough estimate. People don't get huffed if you're a minute or two early/late (unlike in English speaking countries, where people feel a need to apologize if they use "good morning" at two minutes past noon). ...


12

Das Suffix -i im Bairischen entspricht dem Präfix "hin-" im Hochdeutschen. Es handelt sich dabei um eine Bewegung vom Standpunkt des Sprechers weg: Ich gehe hinauf = I geh auffi Ich gehe hinaus = I geh aussi Ich gehe hinunter = I geh obi Ich gehe hinein = I geh eini Ich gehe nach vorne (Sprecher steht hinter dem Angesprochenen) = I geh firi Das Suffix -a ...


11

I don't think you could translate it with an English word 1:1. As you said yourself, it can have many meanings in German. In fact, you can say it in response to almost any question. Wie schwer ist diese Aufgabe? Passt schon! Hast du dich sehr verletzt? Passt schon! Das macht 48 Euro. Passt schon. (Keep the change) Lass mich das machen! Passt schon. (I ...


11

As a Non-Bavarian with roots in Bavaria, my experience is such: As a Bavarian in Bavaria: That greeting is totally neutral with no notion of a religious attachment As a Non-Bavarian in Bavaria: Using "Grüß Gott" is the same as mentioned above, with a slight hint to respecting the culture. Using "Guten Tag" is a clear statement that you're not a local, but ...


9

The full phrase is „Leider, leider sagt der Schneider, macht der Schuster keine Kleider.” and is a simple rhyme meant to gently/jokingly tell you that you can't have everything you want/just the way you want it. A simple translation is "Unfortunately, says the tailor, the shoemaker doesn't make clothes," but it loses all rhythm and rhyme in the ...


7

There would be another alternative. Habe die Ehre It is an older but still used form in Austria. It can be used to say Hello and Good bye. Younger people often use a derived version to greet each other. Dere


7

I generally discourage religious phrases, but "Grüß Gott" has really lost its religious meaning and is used by most atheists (with some exceptions, of course) because of the dominant geographical meaning. Note that you can get through the day with the acceptable "Guten Morgen!", "Mahlzeit!", "Schönen Abend!". but not everyone likes "Mahlzeit" because ...


7

Laut Wikipedia ist "bairisch" die heutzutage übliche Schreibweise für den "Dialektverbund" der bairischen Sprachen, der aber nicht auf den Freistaat Bayern begrenzt ist (Karte) Der Begriff "bayerisch" ist begrenzt auf den Freistaat Bayern: Das Wort „Bairisch“ ist ein dialektologischer Begriff, der sich aus der Bezeichnung der ersten „deutschsprachigen“ ...


7

I am from Bavaria and to be honest, I doubt that people today actually see a religious background in saying "Grüß Gott". It's just the way they greet each other. So a reply like "I will if I ever meet him" or "whom?" or "which one?" will mostly be frowned upon. Personally I think that this is even more rude than greeting an anti-religious person with "Grüß ...


7

Meanwhile, it does refer to delicacies anywhere. "Schmankerln" can be used in different figurative senses: to denote other than austrian / tyrolean / bavarian / franconian gastronomic delicacies; to denote other than gastronomic delicacies, for example musical pieces in a concert or special features of an object (Die Zeit about a special edition of the ...


6

I think people use it more in Bavaria. It is "passt schon", but it is used more like "it's okay" or "everything is fine" or even sometimes "whatever" e.g.: 1. A: Bist du krank? B: passt scho'! (means maybe he's sick or not, but it doesn't bother him) 2. A: How's your work? B: passt scho'! (it's a more positive okay) 3. A: Sorry, I'm late! B: passt scho'! ...


5

I was born in the city of Kiel in the north, and have been living some time in Karlsruhe in the south. I made it a point to answer "Grüß Gott" (a typically southern greeting) with a stereotypical northern german "Moin Moin" (related to dutch "mooi moin", Schönen/Guten Tag). Delivered with the proper grin it works very well: It also switches their response ...


5

Hello, I'm looking for polite alternatives to the omnipresent Grüß Gott in Austria/Bavaria. I'd say there isn't an alternative on the same level of formality. "Servus" is an informal alternative but there are many situations where it's not appropriate. "Guten Tag" is certainly not an option. Using it expresses your unwillingness to accept local ...


5

Just a guess: I'm translating it back to the Bavarian dialect: I geb's eana, wenn ma's hom. or Wenn ma's hom, geb i's eana Dialect words: eana = Ihnen ma's = wir es hom = haben I think it's not supposed to be funny in an intellectual way, but just a phrase that was meant to cheer up people a little.


5

Das Wort speiben (dialektal für speien) wird in Österreich (außer Vorarlberg), Bayern und Südtirol umgangssprachlich für sich übergeben verwendet. Wikipedia führt das Wort in der Liste der Austriazismen. Für Österreich gibt es diese Karte, die anzeigt, wo das Wort verwendet wird: Die Herkunft: aus dem mittelhochdeutschen spī(w)en, althochdeutsch ...


4

Vielleicht noch einige Ergänzungen zu splattnes und Joachims Antworten: Das "i" ist 'breiter als im Hochdeutschen, es geht eher in Richtung "e". Das "b" ist (typisch bayrisch/österreichisch) eine Mischung aus "b" und "w". Die Ableitungen sind tatsächlich sehr regelmäßig. Für Auswärtige vielleicht nicht sofort ersichtlich ist, dass obi von hinab kommt :) ...


4

Die dialektale Präposition aufi, die in bayerischen und österreichischen Dialekten verwendet wird, bedeutet auf Hochdeutsch "hinauf" - oder kurz: "rauf". Mia miassn aufn Berg aufi kraxln. Wir müssen auf den Berg hinauf klettern. obi bedeutet "hinunter" / "runter": Zum Glück bin i ned obi gfalln. Zum Glück bin ich nicht hinunter gefallen.


4

I asked my boyfriend who's from Bavaria and he didn't have the slightest idea. ^^ I don't think it's a "common saying", but rather something that bakery lady usually says. The joke about is is probably neither very good nor easy to explain. ^^ I think it circles around the customer's confusion it creates for a second (as one doesn't expect to hear a ...


4

German /r/ can be pronounced as /R/ (uvular trill), /ʁ/ (fricative), and in some accents /r/ (/r/ is not very common). There is probably not any logical distribution of regions with a uvular trill versus fricative as in French, as it seems to be in free variation in German (it is very obvious in some languages when the sound is a uvular trill versus ...


4

1.) Would using a trilled R give a learner a marked Bavarian accent? No. The most distinct characteristic of Bavarian is its pronunciation of vowels (especially diphthongs). Without them, you won't sound Bavarian at all. 2.) Is having a marked Bavarian accent a bad thing? Really, really depends on where you're going. Some people are pretty hostile ...


4

Update Wenn du Bayern als Gebiet meinst und nicht die bayrischen Dialekte: Die Verwendung/Nicht-Verwendung des Präteritums hängt wohl stark davon ab, ob jemand den bayrischen Dialekt spricht (wie es in ländlichen Gegenden üblich ist) oder nicht ("Zuagroasde"). Die des Bayrisch Mächtigen werden das Präteritum aus Gewohnheit oder instinktiv auch in der ...


4

The translations you show are the best ones I think - "no problem" when used as a response to an apology you don't feel is necessary "never mind" when used to "undo" a previous sentence "you're welcome" when used as a response to a "thank you". This is highly informal language - there are many situations where it might not be 100% appropriate.


3

There's also a more sarcastic/ironic version, Passt schon or Schon recht which could be translated to whatever [you say] or Yeah, right. The meaning of it is very close to Bullshit, but packed into a more polite It's wrong and you're wrong and I tell you that, but if you want to believe it then so be it, I won't argue with you. Example: A: Wusstest du ...


2

Zwar etwas anders geschrieben, aber mit gleicher Wortherkunft und Bedeutung ist "speien" ein in der deutschen Sprache weit verbreitetes Verb. Es wird im schwäbisch-alemannischen Raum häufig und im hochdeutschen Raum in der gehobenen Sprache in den Bedeutungen "spucken" und "sich erbrechen" verwendet. Zur Etymologie (nach Pfeifer) findet sich bei DWDS: ...


2

Even in Bavaria Grüß Gott is not used all the time. Before noon you can just use Morgen. But I'm not sure at which is the correct boarder between the two usages, because I'm only a Zugereister, meaning I didn't grow up in Bavaria. You can use Hallo to friends (Bekannte) and peers (Kollegen) or in a shop. At noon peers are using Mahlzeit as standard form ...


1

I feel like you and don't like using Grüß Gott. I am German and live in Baveria. I have always used Hallo and Tschüs (sounds softer with long ü) throughout my live in any situation. I never felt that anybody felt this to be inappropriate or impolite.


1

'Mahlzeit' is used in offices and other work-places all over Germany, between about half-an-hour before the usual lunch-time to about an hour afterwards. From about an hour before going-home-time (or 'knocking-off-time', as we say in England), Germans will often say 'Feierabend!'. This has nothing to do with a planned celebration or party; it just means time ...



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