Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

As a Non-Bavarian with roots in Bavaria, my experience is such: As a Bavarian in Bavaria: That greeting is totally neutral with no notion of a religious attachment As a Non-Bavarian in Bavaria: Using "Grüß Gott" is the same as mentioned above, with a slight hint to respecting the culture. Using "Guten Tag" is a clear statement that you're not a local, but ...


7

I am from Bavaria and to be honest, I doubt that people today actually see a religious background in saying "Grüß Gott". It's just the way they greet each other. So a reply like "I will if I ever meet him" or "whom?" or "which one?" will mostly be frowned upon. Personally I think that this is even more rude than greeting an anti-religious person with "Grüß ...


4

German /r/ can be pronounced as /R/ (uvular trill), /ʁ/ (fricative), and in some accents /r/ (/r/ is not very common). There is probably not any logical distribution of regions with a uvular trill versus fricative as in French, as it seems to be in free variation in German (it is very obvious in some languages when the sound is a uvular trill versus ...


1

I feel like you and don't like using Grüß Gott. I am German and live in Baveria. I have always used Hallo and Tschüs (sounds softer with long ü) throughout my live in any situation. I never felt that anybody felt this to be inappropriate or impolite.


1

'Mahlzeit' is used in offices and other work-places all over Germany, between about half-an-hour before the usual lunch-time to about an hour afterwards. From about an hour before going-home-time (or 'knocking-off-time', as we say in England), Germans will often say 'Feierabend!'. This has nothing to do with a planned celebration or party; it just means time ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible