Hot answers tagged

24

-zeug used to be a collective noun, referring to a set of things. This is still the main use: Bettzeug, Badezeug, Flickzeug, Grünzeug, Handwerkszeug, Regenzeug, Schlagzeug, Schreibzeug, Schuhputzzeug, Spielzeug, Strickzeug, Werkzeug, Zaumzeug Sometimes, however, this set became a single thing in the public mind, while people still kept using -zeug for it. ...


18

The previous answers are already good but I too want to add something. While in today’s language Zeug means stuff (e.g. “Räum dein Zeug weg!” = “Clean up your stuff!”) it used to have the connotation of “the things you need to do something”. There still is a saying: “das Zeug dazu haben” (“to have the stuff to do something”), which means to have the guts or ...


14

Short answer: you refer to Obst as a culinary / cooking / baking / preparing-food term (fruit substance), whereas Frucht is a biological / botanical word (for example a tree consists of the stem, leaves, fruits...). Long answer: It is not very easy to make a 100% clear difference between them. If you say: Ich esse gerne Obst. and Ich esse gerne ...


12

Zusammensetzungen, die fremde (meist englische) Wortgruppen enthalten, werden mit Bindestrich geschrieben, d.h. nicht eingedeutschte Wörter werden korrekterweise mit Bindestrich(1) in zusammengesetzte Substantive eingebaut, also die Thread-Klasse und die Start()-Methode. Der Bindstrich darf nicht entfallen, so dass ein Gebilde aus zwei extra groß ...


10

Some additional information to complement Ingmar’s good answer. Zeug translates to stuff, and you will get a perfect intuition for what’s going on if you just translate it that way. To apply this to your and Ingmar's examples: Spielzeug = playstuff = stuff to play with = toy(s) Flugzeug = flightstuff = stuff to fly with = plane Bettzeug = bedstuff = stuff ...


9

Von einer Konvention würde ich keinesfalls sprechen, zumal die Bezeichnungen offenbar wild durcheinander gehen: Du schreibst von Rohr-Rohzucker, z.B. von Südzucker, @dakab kauft Roh-Rohrzucker, z.B. von Naturata und in meinem Vorratsschrank steht Rohrohrzucker (ohne Bindestrich) von Sessler. Ansonsten bleibt es dem Hersteller und seinem Produkt- bzw. ...


8

This may be a joke word. 1989 seems correct, but it may have been 1988. The writer Roy Bradbrook wrote commentaries for the magazine AIR International. He wrote about the aviation industry, current events, and tied them in with historical titbits. The pieces were accompanied by a cartoon that commented on some part of the text. For instance, when writing ...


8

Bei sandstrahlen handelt es sich um eine Zusammensetzung und nicht um eine lose Gruppe von Wörtern. Es wäre sonst sehr schwierig, in einem Satz wie Wir müssen das Teil noch Sand strahlen die Anwesenheit von zwei Objekten zu erklären (das Teil den Sand strahlen, Akkusativ? das Teil dem Sand strahlen, Dativ?); ein weiteres Indiz ist die alleinige Betonung auf ...


8

Keep case-sensitive as a foreign word, or use a ‎supporting sentence instead of a participle construction ("wobei Groß- und Kleinschreibung unterschieden wird"). As usual, the best actual choice depends on the context. In general, you can find examples on linguee.de. I've never seen a German term for this. For your example I'd write: Wie bei allen ...


7

To find that a person's name or a place can be glued together with other nouns, just look at a German map, e.g. Adenauerallee Alexanderplatz Barbarossaplatz Kyotostraße Michigansee Nizzaallee Victoriasee These are all locations named after a person or place. You may note that there are streets which are not compounds, e.g.: Aachener Straße in Cologne ...


6

Tourengenerierung bedeutet, dass eine Tour generiert wird, genau wie bei der Routenplanung eine Route geplant wird. Das en hinter Tour bzw. n hinter Route ist ein Fugenlaut, der die Aussprache erleichtert. Es handelt sich also nicht um Mehrzahlformen, die hier mit der Planung bzw. Generierung verknüpft werden. Nun könnte man sich fragen, wie es heißt, wenn ...


6

Both "Dächersee" and "Dächermeer" would be comprehensible and acceptable words in the context of a poem. Outside of poetic language, a similar word, "Häusermeer", is actually even somewhat usual. While "die weiße Dächersee" and "das weiße Dächermeer" would accurately describe the snow-covered roofs (and possibly fit with your poem), a translation that is a ...


6

[I hope an answer in German is fine; in a nutshell: you can try a neologism, but there is no intuitive good one.] Es gibt m.W. tatsächlich keinen etablierten „deutscheren“ Begriff für case-[in]sensitive, also für die Unterscheidung von Groß- und Kleinbuchstaben. Man könnte allerdings einen Neologismus bilden: Von bspw. context-sensitive wissen wir, dass ...


6

I do not know a name for this specific construction, but I see some more general devices in action here: It is a word play (German: Wortspiel). More specifically, it is an anagram (Anagramm) - at least formally (see also the Duden's definition), while usually in an anagram you find much more extensive changes of the original word. There are other terms ...


6

Nach Wikipedia werden Buchstabentausch und Wortsilbentausch zusammen aufgelistet. Das Beispiel, das dort als Erstes aufgelistet wird passt auch sehr gut mit obigen zusammen: Hauptpreis sind ein Paar kopflose Schnurhörer statt Hauptpreis sind ein Paar schnurlose Kopfhörer Somit wäre obige Figur ein Wortsilbentausch. According to the German ...


5

Ich möchte noch einen anderen Aspekt ins Spiel bringen. Der bei uns daheim bevorzugte Anbieter schreibt MARKE Rohrohr Zucker auf seine Tüten. Das bringt mich abwechselnd zum Weinen und Lachen. Ersteres wegen des Deppenleerzeichens (es fehlt der Bindestrich nach "Rohrohr"), und letzteres, weil ich auf den ersten Blick erst einmal "Rohr-Ohr" lese (...


5

In addition to Barths answer it should be noted that neither are all Früchte Obst, nor is every Obst a Frucht. For example: Strawberries are considered Obst, while they are not a Frucht in the biological sense. Ananas is considered Obst, but is not a Frucht, but a Fruchtverband. On the other hand, peppers (Paprika) and tomatoes are Früchte but are not ...


4

Obst and Frucht/Früchte are the same thing in the supermarket. Obst has no plural, which makes it easier to use, it also has no second meaning, so I would stick to that for the time being. Obststand = Früchtestand (fruit stand) Obst essen = Früchte essen Obstkuchen = Früchtekuchen (selten) Obstfliege = Fruchtfliege Obstsalat = Fruchtsalat ... Obstwasser ...


4

According to § 37 (2) of the official spelling rules, multi-part nominalizations are generally written as one word (which, being a noun, is then capitalized as usual): Zum Vergammelnlassen ist es zu schade. In more complex compounds, hyphens are used to separate the parts (§ 43): Zum In-den-Mülleimer-Werfen ist es zu schade. In these ...


4

This would be somewhat unusual, but if I have won against Karl, I can call myself “Karlbezwinger”.


4

Ich versuche mich mal an einer Antwort, die den Faden von einigen meiner und anderer Kommentare aufnimmt und weiterspinnt: Zunächst einmal ist die Bildung „Vogel Strauß“ und „Vogel Roch“ für mich ursprünglich dieselbe Begriffsbildung wie „Insel Mainau“ und „See Genezareth“. Ganz einfach, weil ein neues, „fremdländisches Wort“ im Deutschen immer zuerst als ...


3

I assume that you meant Lagenzahl. If so, then there is no difference; Zahl is often used synonymously with Anzahl, which is slightly more precise. Of course, I may be completely wrong and it's a constant named by some Monsieur Lagan.


3

Observation: All text processors at hand use one of these or close variants. If in search of a click box label within a search dialog I find a ≠ A quite international and hard to beat. There is of course no guarantee, to find a phrase with similar elegance for any concept in two different languages. While lower case and upper case strongly point in ...


3

schön - beautiful, lovely schon - already, yet, before "Du schaffst das schon" / "Du schaffst es schon" - Are both valid in this case. "Du schaffst's schon" - It shouldn't be used in formal written conversations and its only rarely used in informal spoken conversations (as pointed out by guidot).


3

Hessesche Matrix and Hesse-Matrix are synonyms. As for the spelling, you need the hyphen, because Hesse is a proper name. And you cannot omit it, since, as mentioned, it would be a Deppen Leer Zeichnen. See also this question.


3

Dächermeer would sound appropriate to me. I would translate the sea to das Meer, and not der see. See means lake when you do not us the pronoun die.


2

Regel 54 ist grenzwertig in diesem Fall. Man könnte argumentieren, dass der Sand in sandstrahlen seine Eigenständigkeit verloren hat, denn jetzt ist es ein Strahl und eben nicht mehr nur Sand. Außerdem gibt es keine wirkliche transitive Form von "strahlen". "Etwas strahlen" ist seltsam, daher wirkt "Sand strahlen" für mich falsch. Das gleiche Argument ...


2

Yes, the type of compound words you are looking for is possible. One of the most well-known a few years ago was: Effefinger (Effenbergfinger) Also: Effe-Finger, Effenberg-Finger This derived from footballer Stefan Effenberg showing his fans the finger during a football match (which, according to Wikipedia, led to his expulsion from the national team)....


1

In fact, some common given names, e.g. Karlheinz, are compounded (Karl + Heinz). But a person can have several given names, so Karl Heinz Böhm is not the same like Karlheinz Böhm. More often, you see compounds using a hyphen, e.g. Hans-Peter. But only some combinations like that are common; for persons with multiple given names, the hyphen is ommited. (E.g. ...


1

I agree with Crissov that it would not be too late to introduce a neologism. After all, case-sensitive and case-insensitive are handy terms, but they are not readily understood when encountered for the first time. So, if a German neologism is readily understood, and is just as handy, why not? Here is my try: groß-klein-abhängig and groß-klein-unabhängig ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible