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28

"Jawohl" is a normal German word, used as a strong affirmative. It doesn't have a specifically Nazi background, but one of its main uses has always been in the military, including the Wehrmacht. Wiktionary says: drückt unbedingte Zustimmung aus (expresses unconditional agreement) Google NGram shows it has been in use during all times since 1800. I'd ...


23

Generally, "selbstbewusst" has a positive connotation and I've rarely heard it used in a negative way. It could be used as an euphemism for arrogant or selfish, however. Tone and context would help you decide if that's the fact.


18

I wouldn't say it carries the "N-word" with it but it definitely has a military connotation to it. It is sometimes used ironically or tongue in cheek, like e.g.: Kid: "Ich will ein Eis!"Dad: "Jawohl! Kommt sofort." ;-)


13

"Jawohl" in General Answering "Jawohl" in an everyday conversation with Otto Normalverbraucher would probably seem awkward, but not because of associations with Nazi Germany but because of its formal / militaristic connotations. Jawohl, mein Kommandant! "Jawohl, mein/Herr/Frau Kommandant" could be used in a joking way though there is no guarantee everyone ...


12

It's an expression of admiration and has a somewhat old feeling to it. I would mostly associate it with older people who managed to keep particularly fit despite their age. It's perfectly fine to use this in everyday conversations, but it may sound a little bit patronizing/condescending if the person mentioned doesn't feel as old yet. An example would be ...


12

Summary: Books with the title "Frohes Schaffen" have been published by an Austrian social-democratic publisher of children's books since 1925, so a Nazi origin seems unlikely. It's still quite possible that they used and popularized that phrase later, though. There seems to be a book series that was published at least since 1925 with the title Frohes ...


11

Man findet für jeden Begriff eine abwertende Bedeutung, vor allem wenn er sarkastisch verwendet wird. Manche Leute machen sich dann zu viele Gedanken. Ich bin selbst Quereinsteiger in meinem Beruf. Ich bezeichne mich auch selbst als solchen. Das einzige "abwertende" ist, dass man ein geringeres Gehalt bekommt, als Leute die in diesem Beruf ausgebildet ...


11

In einigen wenigen Berufsfeldern wird das Wort verwendet, um zu signalisieren, daß dem beschriebenen Mitarbeiter wesentliche Qualifikationen fehlen, die er nur auf dem regulären Weg zum Beruf hätte erwerben können. Mir fällt als gängiges Beispiel dafür vor allem der Beruf des Lehrers ein, bei dem Quereinsteigern regelmäßig (berechtigt oder unberechtigt) ...


11

Selbstbewusst is chiefly approving. Er präsentiert[=zeigt] sich sehr selbstbewusst. If you want to imply that the confidence is rather negative you have to state that the confidence is exaggerated. This is possible by simply saying that the confidence is too much: Er zeigt sich zu selbstbewusst. Alternatively you can say that the confidence ...


10

4711 (pronounced "siebenundvierzig elf") is indeed a number that people of my age and older know very well because it's a well-known brand of Eau de Cologne ("Kölnisch Wasser"). 815 is actually 08/15 (pronounced "null-acht fünfzehn") and an expression for something that is standard, "plain vanilla." The saying has its origin in the name of a WW I ...


8

I don't know whether it originated from Nazi Propaganda, and honestly, I don't care. This never even crossed my mind. Even if it did, as you say, it seems to have lost all connotation. I don't think we should let evil people dictate what words to use and which ones to avoid; we should not let them monopolize harmless phrases like this one. Indeed, I think ...


8

When used for a technology product the usage of "simpel" is not appropriate. Indeed it does have the subtle meaning of something to be very easy on one hand but on the other hand also to be not so sophisticated. In the context of technology use e.g.: es ist einfach zu bedienen (simple) es ist leicht zu bedienen (easy) es ist nicht schwer ...


7

I'm going to go out on a limb and say no, emsig has no inherent ironic connotation at all. You could use it in an ironic way of course just like most other words. However emsig may be slightly antiquated so you might get a funny look when applying it to someone. Especially because it means that someone just works and works and works and there is a lot to do ...


7

"Jawohl" is the more formal version of "Ja" used very commonly in the Bundeswehr without any connotation. It is also used as shorter version for "zu Befehl" (as you order / at your command) when accepting an order, which is rarely used nowadays. Some examples in military context can be found here. As Germany has had general conscription for quite a while, ...


7

A literal translation of Weltanschauung is "world view." It is the prism ("spectacles" if you will) through which one views the world. Ideologie refers to one's BELIEFS/ATTIUDES about the world. It stems from Weltanchauung, and is shaped by it, but is not the same. That is, Weltanshauung underpins Ideologie. One is cause, the other is effect. For instance, ...


7

In manchen Fällen kann es sogar positiv ausgelegt werden. Wie z. B. ein politischer Quereinsteiger, um zu signalisieren, dass man kein reiner Parteipolitiker ist.


7

Nowadays there is zero religious connotation with that word, simple as that. It's clearly understood as vermin, no more and no less. In the Third Reich, calling Jews "Ungeziefer" was part of the dehumanizing propaganda war against them. Theoretically, that could make for a strenuous religious association, but even then, the intention was clearly to portrait ...


7

Wir haben einen Kollegen in unserer (kleinen) Firma, den wir den "4711" nennen, weil er sich überall einmischt. Der Grund dafür, ihn so zu nennen, ist ein alter Werbeslogan: "4711 - immer dabei".


7

Oh yes, there is quite a distinction to make between these two words. "Klassenkamerad" indicates a person who shares the same class with the person speaking. However, it doesn't say anything about the relationship between these two persons! They might be friends, but they also might be archenemies. It simply indicates the share the same class(es). ...


7

Selbstbewusst may also refer to self-awareness, meaning the ability to get something straight in one's own mind. At an extreme extent this may lead to selfishness. Still I hardly hear it being used for anything but confident in everyday language while living in Germany. The only common negative connotation was pointed out nicely by Em1. So in conclusion ...


7

un- This is a very common German adjective prefix used to negate the adjective's meaning. Etymology shows that un- is a prefix of very old origin which can also be found in English (unstable). Whilst grammatically correct, it is not always idiomatic to use it on any adjective (children may do so): unrund, unbedeutend, undurchsichtig (correct) vs. unrot, ...


7

-"aber" has the same meaning as "however" and the contradicted clause can either be positive or negative -"sondern" is used only when the contradicted clause is negative, in other words contains "nicht" or "kein", and it can be translated as "but rather" or "instead" (NOT "instead of")


6

Both meanings are popular, but I can't think of a situation in which a) is intended and b) is understood. So the problem is not a possible misunderstanding. However, to my ears, "simpel" does not sound like a word you want to have in an operating manual. It's not colloquial, but somehow a little blunt (can't find a better way to describe it). The standard ...


6

To me, the word sounds extremely sketchy. It is certainly not a form of intentional overt racism, or a slur. It is not amongst the standard repertoire of insults against ethnicities, minorities etc., and it's not the kind of word you'd not say in front of your grandmother. But I have never heard anybody use that term, and I would be very surprised if I heard ...


6

The Duden, the most influential German dictionary, warns in its entry on Mischling: "Usage of the word Mischling to denote persons is increasingly regarded as discriminating since it is reducing people to their biological origin." So there is a large and growing number of people that would see this word carrying a negative connotation, but also ...


6

In order to find the differences in use cases for the two, we need to take a look at how they can be used. Usage of: bisschen In combination with 'ein' to mark a small amount to mark a small amount of something. Here it is synonym to "wenig" and it's probably a matter of style which one you and your peers prefer to use. Ich habe ein bisschen Geld. | ...


6

Not quite getting the euphemism of using bildungsfern for uneducated but a nevertheless similar English term used in sociology or legal contexts (in the US) is: educationally disadvantaged References: USlegal Definitions. Globe examples of usage, Mondo facto


5

The terminology "public viewing" has been in the English language for a long time. It can mean something which is shown to the public for the first time which is normally kept for private viewing only. A public viewing of a famous picture normally in private possession or for that matter any important object not normally available for the public to view. In ...


5

Eine generelle Ungebräuchlichkeit des Wortes Sachen für Kleidung in der unter d) geschilderten Situation ist mir nicht geläufig. Sachen bezeichnet meines Erachtens die Gesamtheit der Kleidung oder eine nicht näher bestimmte Teilmenge davon. In den Situationen a), b) und c) ist dies der Fall. Daher würde ich Sachen in Situation d) auch benutzen, wenn ich ...



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