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3

Kein is an indefinite pronoun that functions as an article would. And it has almost the same effects on adjectives following it as articles have. When standing alone, adjectives use the strong inflection: Vorgegebener Kurs Vorgegebenen Kurses Vorgegebenem Kurs Vorgegebenen Kurs When preceeded by a definite article, weak inflection is used: ...


3

I would indeed agree that it should read ... keinem vorgegebenen Kurs This goes along the lines of ... steht in keinem vernünftigen Verhältnis ... aus keinem offensichtlichen Grund


2

Direct or indirect are no categories for objects in German grammar. German categories for Objects are: Dativobjekte (objects in dative case), Akkusativobjekte (objects in accusative case), Genitivobjekte and others (Nominativobjekte, Präpositionalobjekt, ...). The verb in the sentences predicate dictates in which case its object(s) have to be. You have to ...


1

This is something you simply need to learn. While you say „jemandem (Dativ) helfen“ you say „jemanden (Akkusativ) sehen“. I guess by there is no direct object (accusative case), but there is a 'for/to whom' sort of which is me you are referring to rules like this. And I don't see “for/to whom” in „jemanden sehen“. Personally I also have doubts whether ...


0

This has nothing specifically to do with the imperative. Any inflected form ending in an unstressed -e is liable to lose the final e, whether it's an imperative ("schreibe!"), a 1st person form ("gehe"), a dative ("Lande"), or a plural ("Schuhe"). Not all of these simplifications are equally far along, but all are widespread. Once a trend like this has ...


1

There are several ways to convey a command or request in German. The imperative proper is derived from the respective 2nd person present indicative form, which may differ from the infinitive stem (see sprechen below). It has no suffix for a singular addressee and a +t for plural addressees. When the +st and +t suffixes require an e in front it should also ...


0

The way I learned the imperative was that you take the conjugation of the verb for the appropriate case, and then drop the respective ending (eg, -st for the du form). By this formulation, we have sagen -> sagst -> sag.


2

"sag" is (in my opinion) more colloquial usage, and it is actually listed at Wiktionary or Duden


6

Die Vermutung mit der „umgangssprachlichen Sonderregel“ trifft es eigentlich genau, es gibt nur eine weitere Einschränkung: Die Sonderregel gilt nur für den Dativ, und da in erster Linie für Maskulinum und Neutrum. Es ist also in der Umgangssprache verbreitet, mit gutem roten Wein, mit gutem kühlen Bier oder nach kurzem gründlichen Nachdenken zu sagen; das ...



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