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Very probably it is not your difficulty but the fact that German grammars have not found yet a way of presenting the adjective declensions in a reasonable form. There are tree types: 1 After sein the adjective has no ending: Der Mann ist alt. 2 There is an adj declension with the endings e/en. If you look at such a declension table you see you don't have ...


1

It is you, but not in the sense that your learning ability is subpar. Almost certainly it is because your native tongue doesn't feature inflection endings the way German does, and apart from the problems of memorizing the values, you have to cope with the concept of them being there at all. This isn't something that you can sidestep - it comes to you after a ...


2

You are in the second declension. The head of your table tells you which environment the adjective is in. Your adjectives environment is: Not on its own (third declension), because there is a für seine before it. Not preceded by a definite article first declension — that would be e.g. Für die guten Leistungen. It is the second declension, because of ...


2

It is Accusative Plural of "die gute Leistung", which is "die guten Leistungen". The sentence would then already make sense: Für die guten Leistungen überraschte ihn die Mutter mit einem neuen Fahrrad But the sentence goes on to specify whose achievements: His achievements. So a possessive pronoun is being used, which is seine in this case (plural + ...


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All the declensions of almost any word are found in Wiktionary, if they are to be declined. As I see that you aim at a basic vocabulary, you won't need in the following pair of years a bigger data basis. Fortunately, in German, nouns are barely declined. Example: you want to know how to decline Elefant. Then you directly search for it ...


2

Wenn der bestimmte Artikel der/die/das als Genusanzeiger fehlt, übernimmt das Adjektiv die Anzeige des Genus.



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