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"der" is the Dativ form of feminine "die" article. In Akkusativ, "die" stays "die". So, “auf der Straße” is a Dativ form, “auf die Straße” is Akkusativ (Genus of Straße is preserved). In German, you use Dative with the location prepositions, when you want to describe a current location (i.e. when something is already in the street). But when you try to ...


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German hat not only three grammatical genders, but also four grammatical cases. The noun »Straße« is always female, but - as any noun - it can appear in any of those four cases. And the article, often together with a changed ending of the noun, depends on this grammatical case. Nominative case (Wer? oder Was? - Who? or What?): Die Straße ist lang. - The ...


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Nothing to do with a changed Genus. The case of substantive and article is ruled by the preposition here. And auf wants the dative, dative of "die" is "der", which just by coincidence looks like the nominative of the masculine "der"


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No, it is always feminine. Just the surrounding construction requires use of dative case. References to static locations frequently do this, while directions are mostly accusative case.



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