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17

You can do it in every-day conversations by E-Mail or chat. But when writing a somewhat official document, you really should try to get the umlauts right. It's just a question of conformity: You want to use the language, so use it correctly. A whole different problem that will probably come up if you manage to get the umlauts in your email is encoding - if ...


16

We are probably talking about then handwriting as it is taught to children in school. Before 1970 When I was at school we were taught the "Lateinische Ausgangsschrift" where we had to make strokes on the letters as shown below: Source: Wikipedia This was mainly done from historic reasons. The school handwritings derived from Sütterlin, and the "Deutsche ...


9

Try to omit this practice as much as possible. Nur sehr geubte Leser werden diesen Satz so entziffern konnen wie er ursprunglich gedacht war. Nur sehr geuebte Leser werden diesen Satz so entziffern koennen wie er urspruenglich gedacht war. Nur sehr geübte Leser werden diesen Satz so entziffern können wie er ursprünglich gedacht war. ...


8

How to handle person's names is a question that's quite common in libraries, for example. The "RAK-WB" ("Regeln für die Alphabetische Katalogisierung - Wissenschaftliche Bibliotheken") have a sophisticated system how to handle a person's name ("Ansetzung"), depending mainly on the nationality of that person. You can find more information on M. Payer's paper ...


7

Back in the days of typewriters this transcription was very common, it's certainly not wrong but the excuse that your computer keyboard does not have those keys is hardly valid nowadays as you can easily change the layout. So if you write a very important document and you use the transcription the recipient may take that as laziness on your part. I for one ...


7

ä → ae ö → oe ü → ue Ä → Ae Ö → Oe Ü → Ue ß → ss (or SZ) The SZ is only for words in capitals (and I think for old spelling). Für LaTeX-Nutzer gibt es auch die Umschreibung "a, "o, "u, bzw. "A, "O, "U (bzw. \"a, \"o, \"u, bzw. \"A, \"O, \"U) You are also asking for a kind of official link. Maybe Din 5007 helps a bit. That's a norm for sorting. An "ä" ...


6

Wikipedia: The umlaut diacritic, consisting of two dots above the vowel [...] Here are the new and old notation of umlauted vowels: Also worth reading: Diaeresis (diacritic): [...] umlaut is a diacritic that consists of two dots ( ¨ ) placed over a letter [...] When it comes to handwriting: In modern handwriting, the umlaut sometimes ...


5

Here is wikipedia's take on the question. Following those rules would sort your list as Beethoven, Dörfener, Dorfer,de Maizière, Mustermann, von Neumann . [So sad you're last, John! But you remain my hero in 20th century mathematics :-). More seriously, the Hungarians call him Neumann János: they put family names before first names, and of course John ...


4

Only if your keyboard doesn't let you enter umlauts. (Even with a US keyboard, you can enter umlauts. Hold down the left alt key and type "129" on your numeric keypad to get the u-umlaut. Learn the numbers for them all, put them on a little post-it note, and stick it to your keyboard. there's only 4 letters in the German alphabet that don't exist in the ...


4

It's a lot easier on US Mac keyboards to get the umlauts—just use the Option key + u to get an umlaut, then type the vowel you want under it: [Option + u, o] gives ö, and [Option + s] gives the "ß." However, I have seen a number of German friends and colleagues write emails to me using the "ue" instead of "ü." So while the new style is inarguably ...


2

I would sort by lastname. I would ignore umlauts, handle ä like a, o like ö and u like ü. With the starting "Von ", "De " etc. I would also ignore them. My ordering would be: van Beethoven, Ludwig Dörfener, Felix Dorfer, Johannes de Maizière, Hans Mustermann, Anton I don't really know if this is correct, but I would do that this way.


2

For another official link I recommend the ICU project (International Components for Unicode). It basically is a database for all(?) languages/scripts and how to convert, sort and compare words to be used by computer programs. They have a ICU Transform Demonstration which demonstrates the transform rules. For German, you can start with "Latin" as "Source 1" ...


2

I've never heard anyone claim that adding dots to form an umlaut is wrong. There are however various ways to mark an umlaut. Especially in handwriting those dots form little lines or even one contiguous horizontal line, because it's hard to place dots properly when your arm is in movement. You definitly won't raise any eyebrows when using dashes instead of ...


1

Diacritical characters can be sorted in two different ways: like in the telephone-book, or like in the Duden. The Duden sorts them like the normal character, a=ä, o=ö and so on: Muller, Erika Müller, Franziska Mueller, Gerd Müller, Hansi Muller, Inge but the telephone-book sorts them like ~e: ä=ae, ö=oe Müller, Franziska Mueller, Gerd Müller, Hansi ...



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