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51

I suggest LEO.org — in Germany it's heavily used for the translation of English words into German and vice versa. There are also forums which help translate whole sentences and idioms. The site also has pronunciation and declination tables for most words (including the English ones). It also includes dictionaries between German and other languages than ...


32

Aside from LEO, I often find dict.cc to be quite handy.


20

While it doesn't have much etymological content, I have found the dict.tu-chemnitz.de dictionary to be very good, especially because it has many examples and phrases.


16

I sometimes look at linguee. They use human translated bilingual texts to suggest translations.


11

Superslang.de is a German site similar to urbandictiory.com: http://superslang.de/


11

Your guess about the cases is correct. "jemandem" and "jemanden" are different inflections of "jemand". "jemandem" is dative, "jemanden" is accusative. You find this with verbs because many verbs take objects, which have to be in a certain case -- depending on the verb in question. "jemand" means someone, and thus refers to a person. "etwas" means something ...


10

I found this site, called German Dialects on the Internet (look at the EDIT part below), which is supposed to help teachers, both from High Schools and Universities to help their students to better understand the dialectal differences among the various German regions and the other German-speaking countries. I've tried some links, and unfortunately not all ...


10

Die sind zwar eher scherzhaft gemeint, aber die Langenscheidt Lilliput Wörterbücher sind glaub ich gar nicht so schlecht. Zumindest sind sie sehr preiswert. ;-) Es gibt davon Deutsch - Badisch Bairisch Berlinerisch Fränkisch Hessisch Kölsch Plattdeutsch Ruhrpott-Deutsch Schweizerdeutsch Schwäbisch Sächsisch Wienerisch


9

Mundmische: mundmische.de ist eine einzigartige Sammlung deutscher Umgangssprache und Sprichwörter. Hier kann jeder seinen Wortschatz erweitern bzw. verbreiten.


7

I haven't found a single resource yet that would cover all dialects, but there are definitely dictionaries for single dialects or dialect groups. The University of Augsburg has a very interesting project called "Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache", where they conduct surveys concerning everyday matters and how they are called in different places, and then ...


7

A site that explains Austrian words and phrases in ordinary German: http://www.ostarrichi.org/woerterbuch.html


7

Es gibt jetzt anscheinend eine eigene Adresse (Domain) für die Wörterbücher: http://www.woerterbuchnetz.de/ Rechte liegen beim Kompetenzzentrum für elektronische Erschließungs- und Publikationsverfahren in den Geisteswissenschaften an der Universität Trier.


7

I recommend "Langenscheidt Power Wörterbuch Deutsch" (ISBN: 3468131100, 978-3468131103), simply based on the fact that I bought it for a friend and she likes it. However, there are many other dictionaries available. In general, the German term for the kind of dictionary you are looking for is "Bedeutungswörterbuch", "einsprachiges Wörterbuch", or also "...


7

Canoonet offers quite a nice clickable word formation tree for many word stems including stimmen. A click on Wordformation will lead to the following tree (only shown in part): One level above would be for the stem Stimme with even more derivations. Also see this related question (in German): Lemma, Grundform-Lexikon deutscher Sprache


6

In an etymological context the abbreviations you found mean: altn. altnordisch altn. altniederländisch nnl. neuniederländisch schw. Dafür gibt es unterschiedliche Verwendungen: Im nordischen Kontext "schwedisch", evtl. auch "schweizerisch" oder "schwäbisch". Note: the abbreviation schw. also means schwach [gebeugt] in dictionaries.


6

"Langenscheidt" refers to a well-known German publisher of foreign language dictionaries and is sometimes used as a generic term for "dictionary". A bit more information about the company: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langenscheidt


6

The genitive singular ending, together with gender and plural ending, provide strong, often definite information about all inflections of the noun. Although there are four cases and two numbers, German nouns have at most four different forms. For masculine and neuter nouns, genitive singular (“strong” -(e)s or “weak” -(e)n) is almost always different from ...


5

For Swiss dialects, you can use the digital version of the "Schweizerisches Idiotikon". It's a very interesting project, where the German language in Switzerland from the late middle ages until now is documented.


5

My last case scenario: Google Image search Sometimes a dictionary just doesn't cut it, especially for regional food specialities


5

Weird that nobody has mentioned Google Translate so far. Since I got to know linguee, that and Google translate have made Leo obsolete for me.


5

erfolgen = to happen, to occur see this dictionary http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/dings.cgi?service=deen&opterrors=0&optpro=0&query=erfolgen&iservice=


5

Half of the answer has been given (jdm [or jmdm] Vs. jdn[or jmdn]). Here two other points to consider. First, the answer is a little grammar as well. Not all verbs have a fixed case; for instance waschen: Ich wasche etwas Akk.. but Ich wasche mir Dat. die Hände. So you might have to do the analysis by yourself. Second, etw and sich are also ...


5

Looking at my 3-Volume Webster I'm afraid, there is currently no counterpart (observing the decline of printed reference works like Britannica and Brockhaus this is not going to improve). In my opinion the closest match is the big Wahrig (ISBN 978-3577102414). In contrast to Webster it has nearly no diagrams of the objects described, just textual ...


5

I haven't found any explanation of abbreviations on that site, but having skimmed some entries I suppose that inf stands for informal. I guess the first inf belongs to the German term versieben and the second one to the English to make a mess of. Edit: How inf possibly was created If you submit entries to that site, you can add some optional (tag-like) ...


4

Ich habe nicht alle ausprobiert, aber ich denke das von Langenscheidt ist das Beste. Es hat genug Audiosamples, jedoch wenige Beispielsätze. Dafür eignet sich Dictionary for German as a foreign language PREMIUM by PONS zum Nachschlagen von Beispielen - hat aber keine Audiosamples. iPad Duden - German spelling dictionary, 25th edition (beinhaltet aber ...


4

In addition, I'm using the terminology database of the European Union, IATE, for technical and buerocratic terms. For an example, try to feed it a word widely used in various fields of terminology, such as dove-tail. Link: Inter-Active Terminology for Europe Original Text: Zu ergänzen sind vielleicht noch Dictionaries zu Fachbegriffen. Relativ häufig ...


4

I like using WordReference, which has an English <=> German dictionary as well as forums about specific word usage. Duden is also free online now.


4

If you want a confident and up-to-date source, use one where several authors and experts contribute to a discipline. This is mostly a compendium, handbook, encyclopedia. I would not trust very much an internet source here. A handbook is a current mirror of all discussions in the scientific community written by experts. Mostly up-to-date and corrected in ...


4

I will try to split your question into three parts and answer them separately. Some general remarks: unlike in English dictionaries, it is rather uncommon for German dictionaries to provide any phonetic transcription. Most German words (more than 95%) are just read according to simple rules and you don't need a special IPA case for every word. Duden, one of ...



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