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0

Eine einfache Übersetzung (simple translation): (a) The chicken is producing an egg while being on the floor. (b) The chicken is putting an egg on the floor. B sounds a little weird indeed. But they are definitely both correct german.


0

I consider both as correct, and I'd recommend the usage of one or the other depending on what you want to emphasize, and where you want to guide your audience mentally to prepare for what's coming next. If you want to focus your audience on the location where the egg can be found, you'd prefer (b), focusing your audience on the further fate of the egg, if ...


-1

Der merkwürdigste Mythos findet sich wohl in Terry Pratchetts Science Fiction/Fantasy Romanen. Bei ihm schwebt eine Schildkröte mit einem Elefanten auf dem Rücken durch den Kosmos (erinnere mich nicht mehr so ganz genau an sein Bild). Das ist keine Erfindung von Pratchett, sondern ein Mythos aus Indien. Auch hier erinnere ich mich nicht mehr an genauere ...


1

Märchen, Legenden, Sagen, Mythen Als Begriff der Literatur ist eine Legende eine Heiligengeschichte, gehört also dem religiösen Bereich an. So auch de.wikipedia in Legende. Das Wort Legende kommt vom lateinischen Verb legere lesen und hat die Form eines Gerundivs legenda. Mein Metzler Literaturlexikon sagt: mittellateinisch legenda, Plural von legendum das ...


1

Schriftsprachlich werden – sofern nicht in Anführungszeichen mündliche Rede wiedergegeben wird – nur vollständige Sätze, die allein stehen können, mit einem Punkt abgeschlossen. Unvollständige Sätze, bspw. ohne finites Verb, werden mit Komma, Semikolon oder Doppelpunkt an einen Hauptsatz (oder einen anderen davon abhängigen Teilsatz) gebunden. Den linken ...


1

Nach meinem Sprachverständnis: Die erste Version mit dem Doppelpunkt ist eine direkte, unmittelbare Beantwortung der Frage, was zu tun ist: "Wenn die Glocke läutet, muss ich (wie alle anderen auch in diesem Gebäude) zum Essen gehen." Die zweite Version deutet eine kleine Nachdenkpause und ein bisschen Sarkasmus an, so als ob "Zum Essen gehen" nicht die ...


3

Both are unrealistic and with this I'm seconding j0hj0h: „Both sound strange at first to me.“. I've never seen a hale authentic hen laying an egg on or onto the (bare) ground. (I agree I've never seen a chicken farm from inside but the animals there are neither hale nor authentic anyway.) Maybe that's why „legt ein Ei auf den Boden“ sounds even stranger ...


9

It depends on the context. Both sound strange at first to me. If you are talking about a chicken that is sitting on the ground and then you want to express that it lays an egg, you would say "Das Huhn legt ein Ei auf dem Boden". That way it feels as if you would say "Das Huhn ist auf dem Boden und legt ein Ei". If you want to state that the chicken is ...


-2

auf dem Boden (dative) is a where-indication. auf den Boden (accusative) is a where-to-indication. So only (b) is correct. German distinguishes strictly between where and where to. There are languages that don't make this distinction.


4

There is some overlap, of course. As I see it, the main difference between fremd and fremdartig, when put together like this, is that fremd means simply alien or foreign, in the sense of belonging to some external, third party, whereas fremdartig refers to the thought itself, judging it strange, different, outlandish. The same is true for befremdend or ...


6

The verbal form „soll“/„soll nicht“ (“shall”/”shall not”) is used to indicate requirements strictly to be followed and from which no deviation is permitted. German standards (e.g. DIN) prefer „muss“/„darf nicht“, whereas English standards do not use “must” as an alternative for “shall” in order to avoid any confusion between the requirements of a standard ...


0

The difference between „sollst“ and „solltest“ is that “solltest” is the subjunctive mood (zu deutsch.: Konjunktiv) of the verb “sollen”. It not necessary have to do something with been polite.


5

Du sollst nicht töten. This is one of the ten commandments of the Bible. It is like an imperative. Arzt: Sie sollten nicht rauchen. Recommendations are given in this form.


3

They indeed overlap in meaning and are often used synonymously. It's hardly possible to point out the differences. This is my try: Charakter Your personality. All your inborn qualities and features. Also any of your characteristic idiosyncrasies. Eigenschaft A particular quality or feature of you. Eigen means belonging to oneself. Merkmal A ...


2

There is certainly some overlap, but let me try. Charakter first: It can mean character, or personality. Basically it refers to how a person (or animal) is, what defines them, their nature. It's more than one trait, it refers to the whole blend, as it were. Eigenschaft, on the other hand, refers to a certain quality or attribute. Take a substance or ...


2

You have to distinguish between semi-reflexive verbs (Ich wasche mich/dich/sie...), and fully reflexive ones (Ich freue mich/dich/sie/...). Some reflexive verbs come with a dative sich. To find out whether those are fully or semi reflexive, try to replace sich with another dative pronoun: Das Kind merkt sich/dir/ihr alles. So sich merken is fully reflexive. ...


2

Both versions are possible, and they are equivalent. The Duden has a nice short article about this phenomenon.


1

There is really not much of a difference, I think. Perhaps den ganzen Tag über could be translated as all day long.


4

It's one of the basic functions of über, meaning lang or während. For me there's no difference in meaning. Maybe the variant without über is even a contraction of the one with it. Additionally, here's a drawing: Fits, doesn't it? Apart from this intuitive approach, I can't find any other (e.g. etymological) "reasons" for über in this context.


8

Ich würde sagen, diese Unterscheidung ist im Wesentlichen korrekt. Belege liefert z.B. der Duden: Nummer: Zahl, die etwas kennzeichnet, eine Reihenfolge o. Ä. angibt. Es ist nach meiner Lesart schon wichtig, dasss eine Zahl (im Sinne von Ziffernfolge) der wesentliche Bestandteil ist, aber es können, wie bei Hausnummern, auch Buchstaben enthalten sein, und ...


-3

you can speak "fliessend" with just 1000 word vocabulary and make a small talk as a drunk person, but to make a verhandlungssicher businesstalk you must be "geschaeftsfahig" must know 100000 words and also subjonctiv or "konjunktiv" also the abstract and visionery language. it is important for contracts and projects. this is the difference to small talk. ...


2

There is a difference between the two phrases: They do mean exactly the same (once a week), but einmal die Woche is only colloquial and I wouldn't use this in written German.


2

Another possibility is wöchentlich which also means that something happens once a week.


0

"hilfsbereit" is someone who is willing to help - that doesn't mean that what this person does is actually helpful (but the word doesn't indicate that someone isn't actually helping, it's neutral in that respect). "hilfreich" is someone or something who or which is helpful. A screwdriver is "hilfreich" if you need to loosen a screw. A car mechanic is also ...


1

I would say "hilfsbereit" refers to a person who tends to help others. And "hilfreich" mostly refers to non-persons as in "Ich hoffe meine Antwort war hilfreich", meaning was of some help. Occasionally "hilfreich" can refer to a person, meaning that person has helped a lot.


4

Both can be used to describe people, with a difference: hilfsbereit means that someone is glad/likely/ready to help. It can, but does not necessarily mean that this person actually does/did something helpful - for that you have hilfreich. Examples Telling you Du warst heute sehr hilfsbereit. You were very eager to help today. instead of Du warst ...


1

You are right about a) being correct and the meaning of the resulting sentence. "hilfreich" directly applied on people - to me it sounds a bit strange. E.g. when I wanted to thank someone I would rather say "Sie haben mir sehr geholfen" oder "Sie waren mir eine große Hilfe". But the Duden explicitly gives examples in that direction, so it is definitely ...


1

Another explanation: Bewölkt: I can see distinct clouds, with (more or less) defined shapes, sizes and borders. Bedeckt: The whole sky looks like a grey veil (hence bedeckt - covered), I can't identify actual clouds i.e. it's impossible to say where one cloud would end and another one starts.


6

In meteorology, the amount of cloud cover (the fraction of the sky that is obscured by clouds) is usually given in eighths (octa or okta). According to Germany’s National Meteorological Service, the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), the cloud cover is described as follows: 0/8 wolkenlos 1/8 sonnig 2/8 heiter 3/8 leicht bewölkt 4/8 wolkig 5/8 bewölkt 6/8 stark ...


2

In German ziehen (to pull) is used as a stem for a variety of verbs relatied to moving house. Of course the meaning ziehen is not restricted to moving alone, sometimes the same prefix is used with an entirely different meaning: umziehen: to move (house) also to change clothes wegziehen: to move away also to draw away ausziehen: to move out also to ...


0

I would use "umgezogen" if i knew where exactly they have have moved. otherwise, i would use "verzogen". If i know the city or region, i might say "verzogen nach [region/city]". I think "verzogen" therefore can also express that you are not willing to tell (the person who asked) their new adress. On the other hand, when my answer is simply "Sie sind ...


4

With regard to moving, there's no difference at all. Both verbs convey the idea of changing your address. Verziehen, however, is rarely used; only occurs in the form verzogen sein or unbekannt verzogen. You're always on the safe side using umziehen (or wegziehen, fortziehen, meaning to move away). Both verbs have more meanings, but there's no further ...


6

1 Wir sind nach München umgezogen - meaning we have moved house and live now in Munich. 2 If a letter is turned back to the post office with the remark "verzogen" this means the addessee has moved house, but his new address is unknown. 3 ein verzogenes Kind has no manners because the parents don't know anything about child-raising.


1

We have first to device the following expression: to meet sb/sth into (1) to meet sb and (2) to meet sth. In Case of (1) to meet sb with translation treffen: is used in the German language, for the case if a person has been met, without this was expected. a colleague by chance, on the road, meet on the street einen Kollegen zufällig, unterwegs, auf der ...



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