New answers tagged

2

Correct is, of course, "heißt" - and only that. The verb "heißen" conjugates in the present tense singular like that: ich heiße du heißt er/sie/es heißt and in plural: wir heißen ihr heißt sie heißen You need to you use the singular form here, because the "sister" is only singular. If Patrick had more than one sister, and if you'd be asking "what are ...


0

The difference between the two is mainly focus. In ‘Sie besprechen den Plan’, the focus is on the plan they are discussing. Maybe they already know rather clearly what they want and just have to hash out the details. In ‘Sie besprechen sich über den Plan’, the focus is put more on the discussing people themselves or the discussion itself and less on the ...


2

Anmelden would have the connotation of official registration. As in through sign-up, written registration. Melden would be like raising a hand, making an announcement, stepping forward. It's the general decision to sign up for something, but may not yet involve the formal process. If it does it could be used synonymously. You would use sich für das ...


1

Der Duden bietet als Synonym zu sichergehen an: Sich Gewissheit verschaffen, das deckt sich mit meiner Erwartung, dass hier auch nur eine Überwachung gemeint sein kann, oder etwa, bei einem Lehrer oder Mitschüler nachzufragen. (Das ist ein rein theoretisches Szenario; tatsächlich sind die Schulen [zumindest in Bayern] verpflichtet, bei Nichterscheinen eines ...


3

I think, there is a difference between the use of sich melden zu and sich melden für (even though I couldn’t find references). I would use sich melden zu to signal that I am here and ready to work. Whereas with sich melden für I would show the willingness to do the job in general/later. Example with zu: A: “Ich melde mich zum Putzen” B: “Gut, ...


4

Zusätzlich zu ammoQs und TheCs Antworten beschreibt Lieferung auch die Ware, die geliefert wird. Sätze wie Ist die Lieferung schon da? oder Ich kriege heute eine Lieferung, deswegen kann ich jetzt nicht kommen. trifft man auch an.


2

"Ankleiden" is the action of actually dressing up - From naked to fully in clothes. Mainly used in the reflexive form, but you can also dress up someone else. Works only for actual clothing. "Bekleiden" has the general meaning of "to cover" - Can be used for putting someone else into clothing, i.e dressing up someone else Describing the action that ...


3

Grundlegend ist ein Synonym für die Anlieferung eine Lieferung. Im Sprachgebrauch ist mit der Lieferung häufig der gesamte Ablauf angesprochen. Praktisch der gesamte Versandweg vom Versender zum Empfänger. Bei der Anlieferung wird in dem Sinne meist vom "Zustellen" an den Empfänger gesprochen. Also der ANLieferung AN den Empfänger. Soweit also ...


3

Anlieferung beschreibt nach meinem Verständnis nur den letzten Teil der Lieferung, nämlich den, bei dem die Ware beim Empfänger ankommt. Lieferung beschreibt den gesamten Weg vom Sender zum Empfänger, gegebenenfalls mit Wechsel des Logistikdienstleisters. Oft wird aber "Lieferung" auch als Synonym für "Anlieferung" verwendet.


3

First off, note that both words are not used a lot in colloquial. These are rather formal words. However, in this case, as so often, it's important to understand how the prefixes an- and be- affect the meaning. Admittedly, it's hard to grasp for be-. But basically the prefixes are the opposites to aus- and ent-. The word pair an-/aus- is pretty simple. ...


2

They are not exact synonyms. For example, in figural speech, you can "ein Amt bekleiden" (hold an office) but you cannot "ein Amt ankleiden". Ankleiden means the act of putting on a dress. (change from undressed to dressed) Bekleiden is rather used figuratively ("ein Amt bekleiden") or in the form "mit etwas bekleidet sein" (to wear something).


-2

I don't know why DUDEN lists besprechen as a reflexive verb. It is not used as such. Hence, the second sentence you gave for an example doesn't sound correct to me. You can say: "Sie haben eine Besprechung über etw." oder "Sie sprechen sich ab" but not "Sie besprechen sich über den Plan". This verb is only used as a transitive verb.


1

All three constructions mean the same thing. However, (1) is also used when you give advice to someone: Wir beraten mehrere Fortune-500-Firmen. Here the direct object is the advisee, not the topic under discussion. Usually, context will disambiguate between "Wir beraten den Kunden" and "Wir beraten das Problem", but not always, therefore to be clear ...


1

Your wild guess is wrong, probably because the examples you have seen seem to imply this and are not very well chosen. "Sich streiten" and "streiten" mean more or less the same thing, at least in most cases. "Um" just adds the object argued about. There is a small difference in possible applicability. The reflexive form always refers to more than one ...


2

It's correct as well, and there is no difference in meaning. There is only a small difference in usage: "sich melden zu" can only be used with an activity, say, sich zum Dienst melden sich zum Geschirrspülen melden whereas "sich melden für" can be used with an activity, but also with a place or time (where/when the activity takes place) or an ...


0

The cases. One is Genitiv (auf wessen Kosten?) and the other is Dativ (auf Kosten von wem oder was?), otherwise both are used interchangeably. None is more sophisticated than the other, it's merely a matter of taste.


4

The phrase danke schön! is written in two words, and both are generally lowercase, as they are a verb and an adjective: Vielen Dank, danke schön! Danke schön, das ist sehr freundlich! Können Sie mir vielleicht sagen, wie spät es ist? – Ja, genau zehn Uhr, auf die Minute. – Danke schön. However, the noun Dankeschön is written in one word and ...


3

The following two sentences are correct. They both express a geographical distance. Er wohnt weit entfernt von mir. Er wohnt weit weg von mir. In your first sentence, Er wohnt weit von mir, I am missing something. It's not wrong, but I would like more context. It could be a geographical distance, but it could be also a poetic expression of an ...


8

Actually, there is a difference. Weit is not commonly used for distances (i.e. in the sense of "far") without being accompanied by "entfernt" or "weg". weit standing alone can be used for clothing, meaning a wide fit, or for a wide landscape (i.e. in the sense of "wide", a close relative). Er wohnt weit weg von uns Er wohnt weit entfernt von uns. ...


2

Auf Kosten anderer is a little more "sophisticated".


1

Actually there is no difference. I think most commonly you would use: Er wohnt weit weg von mir.


3

Your choice. There is no difference, both expressions mean the same and are used in exactly the same context. Very much like in English on account of s.o. on someone's account


2

In a nutshell One of the variations you guessed (»bissler«) is wrong. What you heard was either »bisserl« or »bissel«. In Bavaria both are common variations of »bisschen«. In German German both words are non-standard words (i.e. dialect). In Austrian German »bisserl« is part of the standard vocabulary (i.e. not a dialect word). »Bissel« is just transforming ...


1

In my opinion as a native speaker, "Geld sparen" refers to saving money in general maybe without a special purpose. I would always use "Zurücklegen" with something specific in mind why I put this money aside. So, the difference is not the location where you put it, but why you put it there.


2

There is a slight difference between the two expressions: Geld sparen Is used for different purposes: Put money in the piggy bank to save it for later, or maybe for a dedicated purpose. Mein Bruder spart auf ein neues Auto When deciding between two alternative things to buy, buy the cheaper (longer lasting, less consuming, or generally, more ...


4

Geld zurücklegen or Geld zur Seite legen would specifically refer to putting money aside, whether it's under a matress or in a bank. Example Ich lege für mein Alter Geld zurück. Translation I put money aside for my old age. Or Ich lege jeden Tag Geld zur Seite, damit ich mir ein neues Auto kaufen kann. Translation I put money aside ...


3

There is a subtle difference. (Geld) sparen means that you create an extra bank account or put the money under your pillow (for example to buy something expensive in the future). Wir sparen für ein neues Auto. Also, sparen means that you have a possibility to spend less money on something. Dank dem Sonderangebot konnten wir 100€ sparen, weil das ...


1

Geld sparen is somewhat redundant, since sparen alone already means to save money. It is only to due the inflationary use in advertisements (where it frequently indicates just spending a [very little] bit less), that additional clarification is useful. Geld zurücklegen already implies putting the money into a separate bank account or just in an envelope, so ...


2

Der Redensarten-Index kennt beide Versionen. eine scharfe Zunge haben: angriffslustig / widerspruchsvoll reden eine spitze Zunge haben: spöttische / polemische / scharfe / kritische / boshafte Bemerkungen machen Was auffällt, ist, dass beide Definition — trotz der Verwendung völlig verschiedener Wörter — sehr ähnlich sind. Beide beschreiben im ...


4

Bestellen mit is »to order with«: Walter bestellt einen Hotdog mit Ketchup. Walter orders a hotdog with ketchup. Lisa bestellt einen Computer mit einer Maus. Lisa orders a computer with a mouse. Mario bestellt eine rote Jacke mit großen Knöpfen. Mario orders a red jacket with big buttons. Bestellen bei is »to order at«: ...


5

Germans don't say "Ich weiß einen Platz." nor "Ich weiß einen Ort.". They say: "Ich kenne einen Ort." "Gibt es einen Ort in der Nähe zum Übernachten?" is correct. (People understand that you're searching for a hostel or something similar.) If you talk about a "Platz" in regard to "übernachten", it's a spot to sleep (as in: "Du kannst deinen Schlafsack da ...


2

"Gelungen" ist the participle of "gelingen" and has a straightforward meaning of "been successful" - Just like "erfolgreich". Gelungen does, however have a less straightforward meaning that becomes obvious in ein gelungener Abend or gelungene Architektur or eine gelungene Aufführung which cannot simply be be transported by translating to ...


4

Ich würde sagen, der Unterschied von "da" und "hier" in Pronominaladverb ist derselbe, wie bei "da" und "hier" im Allgemeinen. "Da" bezieht sich auf etwas, was weiter weg liegt oder auf etwas, auf das man zeigen kann. Es drückt eine gewisse Distanz aus, ob räumlich, zeitlich oder mental. Und "hier" auf etwas, dass sich in unmittelbarer Nähe befindet. Um auf ...


2

Pronominaladverbien mit "da" bzw. "hier" können in der Regel mit allen Präpositionen verbunden werden, die mit Dativ oder Akkusativ gebildet werden in Beziehung zu konkreten oder abstrakten Gegenständen gesetzt werden können. Ich spreche über das Buch. Ich spreche darüber. Ausnahme aber z.B. "ohne". Ist die Verbindung erlaubt, dann m.W. in ...



Top 50 recent answers are included