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0

müssen is quite more narrow in it's use: Ich muss noch aufräumen. (I have to tidy up) This is a duty/necessity given to me by someone else or myself. I think that I have to fulfill it. Ich muss den Kaffee ohne Milch trinken. (I have to drink coffee without milk) There is no milk left, so I have to drink coffee without milk. This is due to ...


0

"müssen" expresses general obligation. "sollen" is an obligation given by someone. So when you use "sollen" you do imply that someone told you so. Ich muss gehen. I have to go (for whatever reason) Ich soll gehen. I have (just) been told to go. Common contexts for "sollen" are doctors orders as well as the ten commandments. Note that the the ...


2

According to its definition, sollen is used if something is not completely obligatory, but it would be really disadvantageous for somebody if the opposite happened, whereas müssen is really strict and utilized to determine rules and laws or if something is an inevitable condition for something else. Note that the opposite of müssen (a prohibition) is nicht ...


0

The interchangeable expressions (note the different capitalization) [an etwas] schuld sein [an etwas] Schuld haben [an etwas] die Schuld haben [für etwas] verantwortlich sein mean be to blame [for something] They are particularly useful for mentioning the topic (the “something” in square brackets). In the given example, the topic is ...


1

(a) and (b) are near-synonymous. (Example (b) should actually read "War es meine Schuld?", for proper concord.) Both can be said by someone apologizing for a minor or major inconvenience. (c) sounds far more serious; 'schuldig' usually carries a connotation of establishing legal responsibility, and might be used by a judge when pronouncing a sentence. ...


3

The word dran is just a short form/colloquial of daran. So, she could have said: War ich daran schuld? EDIT: It does not have any special connotations. War ich dran schuld?, War es meine Schuld? and War ich schuldig? pretty much mean all the same (Was it my fault? Was I to blame?), though War ich schuldig? sounds a bit stilted, if used in normal ...


0

If you want to say that something happened coincidentally (by chance), you could use zufällig zufälligerweise per Zufall They are all adverbs (or adverb phrases), as they refer to a verb. Their meaning is roughly the same. Most of the time zufällig would be totally sufficient. Example: Wir trafen uns zufällig. (We met coincidentally.) zufälliger is an ...


2

Yes. „zufällig“ is an adjective/adverb, as in: Ich habe ihn zufällig getroffen. („I met him coincidentally“, used as adverb) Die Verteilung der Ergebnisse ist zufällig („The distribution of the results is random“, used as adjective) „zufälligerweise“ is an adverb: Ich habe ihn zufälligerweise getroffen. *Die Verteilung der Ergebnisse ist ...


7

Both are very similar and can often be used synonymously, but there are differences. A Anfrage is a request. You use it to ask for something. For example: Haben Sie meine Anfrage bezüglich des Auftrags erhalten? (Did you get my request regarding the contract?) A Frage is a question. Ich habe eine Frage zu dieser Aufgabe. (I have a ...


2

Bei "zufrieden" ist ein Erwartungswert ausreichend erfüllt. "Froh" bedeutete früher "positiv gestimmt" (siehe: 'Lasst uns froh und munter sein', 'frohgemut' oder 'Frohsinn'), ist in dieser Bedeutung aber veraltet; es bedeutet heute viel eher bewusste Freude über erhaschtes Glück. "Glücklich" ist ein allgemeiner Zustand starker positiver Gefühle. ...


5

Den Unterschied zwischen "zufrieden" (am ehesten: "content, satisfied") und "froh" (am ehesten: "glad") hast Du gut wiedergegeben. Die Beschreibung von "glücklich" stimmt aber nicht ganz. Es gibt einen Unterschied zwischen "glücklich sein" und "Glück haben". Deine Interpretation entspricht mehr der Form "Glück haben". Ich versuche einmal, das hier an zwei ...


4

Ich liebe dich serious, true love (husband to wife, boyfriend to girlfriend), also used in strongly connected families Ich hab dich lieb Medium, not too definitive love or strong, but not yet too settled and meaningful connection, also amongst family members Ich mag dich / Ich hab dich gern good friendship, amongst closer relatives, ...


0

That depends if you are actually requesting a PhD to exist for that software (Which I guess you are not), in that case I would use A). If you are just joking around, I'd suggest using B) as it sounds a lot more natural. Also: "darin" is a world that I would not use in this case, "darüber" would fit it better I guess, and you don't have to mess around with ...


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Actually this is a pretty interesting question. I think I would say "Ich mag dich" to a friend as "Ich habe dich gern" would sound a little odd, where I come from (Austria), the latter one is used more frequently for expressing love.


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According to this source the Duden Volume 9 "Richtiges und gutes Deutsch" explains: Anzahl/Zahl: Die alte Unterscheidung, dass Zahl die Gesamtzahl, die Gesamtmenge ausdrückt, Anzahl dagegen einen Teil davon, ist auch im heutigen Sprachgebrauch noch nicht verloren gegangen und sollte überall da beachtet werden, wo es auf eine präzise Aussage ankommt: Die ...


5

When you are referring to the cardinality¹ of something, i.e., to a count of something, Anzahl and Zahl can indeed be used interchangeably. This applies to all your examples, as they refer to the count of people. However, there are cases, where you cannot use both: If you are referring to a number as a mathematical object or its representation, you can ...


-1

An --> at --> attached to, close to, part of Examples: Anzug Antrag Zahl = Number --> Used if you just want to count Anzahl similar to Amount --> Used if you want to identify a share Teil = part --> A door is part of a car. Anteil = share (of) / amount --> The amount of weight the doors contribute to the cars weight is substantial.


1

They’re interchangeable with a slight amendment in the corresponding sentence. Your four examples would become: Anzahl (von) Arbeitslose(n) die Anzahl (der) Besucher Die tatsächliche Anzahl (der) Ebola-Fälle [...] Zahl der getöteten Personen After Zahl an article necessarily has to follow. That’s not the case for Anzahl; the article ...


0

In Germany we do not have a PhD as an acdemic grade. It may be used referring to people with this degree from abroad but we will not use it in a colloquial or metaphorical sense. In addition we can't use darin as a preposition here. We may use man braucht dazu einen Doktortitel but in the context and example you gave people often say: Zur Bedienung ...


2

You tried to translate your sentence word-for-word, but that doesn't sound right. ...so complicated to use... Native Germans wouldn't say so kompliziert zu benutzen. You either go with so kompliziert only (the use of the software is implicit), replace kompliziert with schwer, or would rephrase it altogether. ...ein PhD darin... // ...einen ...


2

As far as the use of "soll / sollte" is concerned, b) is correct. a) would sound strange to a degree that people might start thinking how to make sense of it, and they maybe would end up with "there are plans to introduce such a PhD in the near future". Like in "Ab nächstem Jahr soll es einen Studiengang in XYZ-Benutzung geben." As a side note: IMHO the use ...


4

As the accepted answer to the question you linked already tells you that version a) would mean something like There shall be a PhD for that. This is a requirement that there has to be such a title, possibly an order to create a course enabling students to obtain such a title (depending on context and the authority of the speaker on that matter). So ...


1

As I understand it, there are two common uses of "allerdings" 1) It can be used in as a pointed confirmatory exclamation similar to the use of "of course" "indeed" or "certainly" in English. According to native German speakers I have conversed with, "allerdings" is employed most frequentely, though not exclusively, to convey a negative sentiment. “Das ...


4

Generell gilt: Sehr bemisst die Intensität. Englisch: very. Viel bemisst die Menge. Englisch: much. Viele/vieler/vieles bemessen die Anzahl. Englisch: many. Daraus folgt, dass man in vielen Fällen sowieso nur eines der beiden nutzen kann, zum Beispiel: Ich habe zu viel gegessen. Es ist zu viel passiert (als dass ich Dir alles erzählen könnte). ...


3

There's a difference in meaning. "viel zu früh" is just a stronger version of "zu früh" (too early). There is a clear threshold defining what level of "early" is still acceptable. "viel zu früh" is far beyond that. Im 7 ist zu früh.Um 5 ist viel zu früh. "Allzu früh" usually doesn't imply such a threshold, and it is not necessarily expressing that ...


1

The standard expression is viel zu früh. Allzu is not technically wrong, but definitely outdated / poetic. Also, it only really works in general expressions: Allzu früh verschied der Dichter ... the poet died far too early In a normal sentence it would sound incredibly stilted: Wir kamen viel zu früh (not: allzu früh) zur Party.


2

I personally feel that spüren is a little more narrow in the sense that there are fewer situations in which spüren is most appropriate than there are for fühlen. Fühlen can be employed more universally as it can describe both a sentiment and a sensory experience, whereas spüren tends to be limited to describing sensory experience. Also, fühlen can be ...


3

Yes and no. Fühlen is less reflected, it refers to feeling your own emotions and things directly touching your skin. Spüren is less direct. It can also refer to things touching your skin (though not to emotions), but is more often used in a more indirect, metaphorical sense – you "spürst" the tension in a room, you do not "fühlen" it. The difference is ...


0

Mit Definitionen wird man die Verwendung von "reden" und "sprechen" schwerlich karmachen. Der Großteil der Verwendungen ist idiomatisch, die man einzeln auflisten und definieren müßte. In einem Teilbereich sind "reden" und "sprechen" gleichbedeutend.


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fällig bedeutet, dass eine bestimmte Sache bis zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt erledigt sein muss bzw. sollte. Man kann es auch verwenden, um zu monieren, dass eine bestimmte Sache noch nicht erledigt wurde. Man findet es insofern oft auf Rechnungen: Fällig am 21.11.2014 (die Rechnung muss bis zum 21.11.2014 bezahlt werden) Es kann auch umgangssprachlich ...



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