Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

"Einen Kaffe zum hier Trinken". They also sometimes ask "Für hier oder zum mitnehmen?", then you can just answer "für hier".


10

I recommend to rephrase the statement in German, but this is difficult if you want to avoid to use the noun „Stadt“ twice: „Die Stadt ist Nummer 45 auf der Liste der schönsten Städte des Landes.“ „Unter den schönsten Städten des Landes nimmt [Stadtname] den 45. Platz ein.“ „Unter den schönsten Städten des Landes steht [Stadtname] an 45. ...


9

There is no difference and you can choose between the two phrases. There is also a third possibility that has the same meaning: einmal pro Woche


6

jp-jee proposed the phrase: Moment, ich gebe dich/Sie weiter. Here, the calling person is "given" to the called person. Another variant is to interchange who is given to whom: Moment, ich geb' sie/ihn dir/Ihnen. Here, the called person (accusative, sie=fem./ihn=male) is "given" to the calling person (dative, dir=familiar/Ihnen=polite). In my ...


6

Although you are not passing the caller himself but the receiver, you'd say something like "Moment, ich gebe dich/Sie weiter". In a call center or wherever a telephone system is used, you would say "Ich stelle dich/Sie durch" before dialing the call-through number.


5

I would say "zum hier Trinken bitte".


4

To make it explicit: The phrase ... but I would prefer to speak in German. translates to ..., aber ich ziehe es vor, deutsch zu sprechen. The additional word lieber, as mentioned in the other answer, is wrong in my opinion as you could translate your phrase to ..., aber ich würde lieber deutsch sprechen. which is also correct, but combing ...


4

Da das Originalzitat ("premature optimazation is the root of all evil") auf Englisch ist, gibt es keine festen etablierten Begriff (zumindest kenne ich keinen), nur Übersetzungen oder das Original (Informatiker reden sowieso viel Englisch). "Vorzeitig" und "verfrüht" sind mir in diesem Zusammenhang als übliche Übersetzungen bekannt. "Übereifrig" und ...


4

One of the most common ways of saying this in German would be: Das kann ich leider nicht tun. or Leider kann ich das nicht tun. Your original sentence is correct, but perhaps not the most idiomatic: it reminds me of HAL 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey, although in reality the famous phrase "I'm afraid I can't do that, Dave" was simply rendered, ...


4

The most common translation would be In meiner Klasse sind 20 Schüler. Or Bei mir sind 20 Schüler in der Klasse. Another possibility is In meiner Klasse hat es 20 Schüler. One would not use "es gibt" in that case because the sentence is only about the number of students while "es gibt" focusses more if an object exists or not. A more ...


4

I would say / write it like this: Die fünfundvierzigstschönste Stadt. I also have my doubts about the correctness, since anything above 12 is uncommon.


3

Those sound more natural to me, you can omit the "tun": Ich bezweifle, dass ich das (tun) kann. I doubt I can do that. Ich befürchte, dass ich dass nicht (tun) nicht kann. I fear I cannot do that. Ich glaube nicht, dass ich das (tun) kann. I don't think I can do that.


2

As already said, it is: "... aber ich ziehe es lieber vor, Deutsch zu sprechen" Please make sure that the comma isn't missing. Please Note: "Lieber" is an additional word, so it is not needed in this case.


2

My translation would be: Better a genie in bed than a genius at the desk. As Toscho pointed out in the comments, this could refer to the speaker him/herself, so an alternative would be Better in bed with a genie, than at the desk with a genius.


2

Better in bed with a flame than at the desk with a shiner. (OK, I'm not 100% happy with shiner here: I use it to convey the meaning of both lamp and (female) brainiac. Can't think of anything better. If you read shiner as black eye it's still funny, though.)


2

I'm not sure if the above comments really explain the meaning of this sentence. I'm trying to explain it. "Leuchte" in this case also refers to a woman/girlfriend like "Flamme" does. The difference is, that "Flamme", actually flames from a fire, here refers to a sexually attractive woman a woman one has just met and is either deeply in love with or feels ...


2

Zu Raphaels erstaunlich langer Liste möchte ich eine Variante ergänzen, in der nicht der Unterton des Genervtseins mitschwingt und deswegen auch für Schriftform taugt: Das macht mir nichts aus.


2

Another informal variant, beside the ones already given: Ich reich' Dich rüber. Best fitting when your friend is sitting across the table, but can be used in the general case as well.


2

Ich fürchte, das kann ich (leider) nicht (tun). ... is perfectly fine and idomatic. In comparison, Das kann ich leider nicht tun. as proposed by "Milchgesicht" simply drops the "I'm afraid" phrase. I'd therefore go with the former, which is closer to the connotation of the English version.


2

If the person is sitting beside you, you can say: Warten Sie kurz, ich gebe ihm/ihr den Hörer. (formal, literal translation) Warte kurz, ich geb' ihm/ihr den Hörer. (informal, literal) Ich gebe ihn/sie Ihnen (gleich). (another formal variant) Ich geb' ihn dir (gleich). (informal) In my opinion, "ich gebe Dich/Sie weiter" would also be used ...


2

The word you're looking for is "der (Telefon)hörer". The literal translation is "the listener", but in context of telephones it was the word for the "bone". Ich lege den Hörer auf. I put down the receiver. Ich nehme den Hörer ab. I pick up the receiver/the phone. The most literal translation of your sentence would be: Ich gebe ihr/ihm den ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible