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14

Das erinnert mich. does not sound plausible at all, but feels rather incomplete. When reading that, I want to ask Woran erinnert es dich? Possible phrases are Da fällt mir ein, ... Wo wir gerade dabei sind, ... Wo ich gerade darüber nachdenke, ...


9

Finanzhauptstadt The complete, grammatically correct sentence would read: "Frankfurt ist die Finanzhauptstadt Europas." (Note that you usually do not use Europa with an article.) Examples of actual usage: "Noch ist London die Finanzhauptstadt Europas." "Doch der Titel 'Finanzhauptstadt der Welt' sieht jetzt gar nicht mehr so erstrebenswert aus." ...


7

In German, the same word, namely Gott, is used for gods that you believe in and those that you do not believe in. However, a Christian will also use Gott as a name without article when referring to his god, while using an indefinite article or specifying the exact god that he is talking about when talking about other gods.


7

Frankfurt ist das Finanzzentrum Europas. The English capital is cognate to Haupt-, making Finanzhauptstadt a nice, literal translation, but Finanzzentrum is both more generic and less figuratively. The Zentrum is the midpoint where it all meets. I have a feeling -hauptstadt is used in rather shallow or general coverage, while -zentrum is the actual ...


6

Yes, you can translate the phrase "That reminds me of ..." with "Das erinnert mich an ..." However "Das erinnert mich." alone is wrong. In your example you would say: Mir fällt gerade ein, dass ich noch... or: Mir fällt gerade etwas ein. Ich muss noch...


6

Direct translation: Das erinnert mich an etwas. Ich muss ja noch das Huhn aus dem Gefrierschrank nehmen. Many shorten it and say was instead of etwas, which makes it a tad informal. We might even say Das erinnert mich woran. Ich muss ja noch … This is quite popular among young people, but it isn't strictly grammatical German (woran is usually ...


5

English "brand" corresponds to German "Marke", but a literal translation of "brand" by "Marke" often yields unidiomatic results. The word is less ubiquitous in German than in English. I'd suggest to drop it completely. For "local", I'd prefer "heimisch" to "örtlich" or "lokal" in this context. So the result is Cocktails mit heimischen Spirituosen


4

The expression apropos is often used exactly that way.


4

Another version: Finanzmetropole But Finanzzentrum is even more common (Google: ~ 132.000 hits; Finanzmetropole: ~70.000; Finanzhauptstadt: ~3.000 - see also this nice Google NGram chart).


3

Your sentence I think the temperature was only 5 degrees, but it felt like negative 30! would I translate like this: Die Temperatur lag wohl bei 5 Grad plus, aber gefühlt bei minus 30! Or like this: Die Temperatur betrug wohl 5 Grad plus, aber gefühlt minus 30!


3

This "I think" somewhat implies that you're guessing, and in the second sentence "it felt like" you're guessing again... is there any constant in your sentence? Also "only" doesn't really fit into this sentence either... (but you've somehow guessed that yourself). Your sentence "I think...was only...it felt like..." would translate as Ich denke, die ...


2

See http://context.reverso.net/translation/english-german/that+reminds+me! "Das bringt mich auf die Idee ..." sounds quite nice to me.


2

Yeah, the English to German translation of "That reminds me.." usually won't do, if grammatically and stylistically correct German is your goal. That said, most people would probably get what you're trying to say if you used it that way. The correct translation/phrase in this context would probably be: "Ach ja! Wo wir grade davon sprechen: (...)" or ...


1

It's wrong by the following reasons: Either you should fix three things: You are missing a modal verb (e.g. können, wollen,...) Er fand endlich eine Frau, mit der den Rest seines Lebens zu verbringen modal verb. (still incorrect) And you are also missing a subject Er fand endlich eine Frau, mit der subject den Rest seines Lebens zu verbringen ...


1

To walk in someone's shadow does NOT mean the same thing as to follow in someone's footsteps. to walk in someone's shadow means that the other person, the person casting the shadow, is more famous, powerful, etc. and commensurately that the person in the shadow is relatively unimportant or obscure whereas to follow in the ...



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