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7

Es macht keinen Unterschied. is a very good translation. Colloquially, you could also say Es kommt auf's selbe raus. Es kommt auf's gleiche raus. Es ist gehüpft wie gesprungen (or some dialectal variant). Some more good suggestions from the comments: Es spielt keine Rolle (thanks @Chris) Es ist gleich/egal. (thanks @karoshi)


2

The other suggestions so far have been excellent. Yet others in the sense that every saint has a past and every sinner has a future came to my mind: Ich habe keine Leichen im Keller. Ich bin hier völlig unbeleckt. Ich beginne hier mit einer weißen Weste. Ich habe da keine Vorbelastung.


4

There are some alternatives to expressing the basic sentiment of starting with a clean slate: Ich fange (ganz) von vorne an. Ich bin ein neuer Mensch. Ich bin ein unbeschriebenes Blatt.


13

The notion of starting anew is very well transported by the phrase seine Vergangenheit hinter sich lassen – to leave one’s past behind (Or if you want to formulate it as a resolution: “Ich will meine Vergangenheit hinter mir lassen.”) Incidentally, Hulk used this construction in his answer. Your translation is also fine, it depends on the context in ...


8

Gestern can be used in the sense of "past" in German. For example, someone who lives in the past would be jemand, der im Gestern lebt. So parallel to that: Ich kenne kein Gestern (mehr). I don't know a past (anymore) in the sense of I don't know you (anymore). Imho it conveyes what you want to express more precisely than Ich habe keine Vergangenheit, ...


4

Well, yes, the translation is correct. Note, however, that the concept itself is not a popular one - you can never completely leave your past behind, be it individual or collective. Attempting to do so will be seen as a weakness by many, as a way of attempting to shun responsibility or running away from something horrible instead of confronting it. Saying ...


6

Yes, it's correct in that there is no more apposite word to express that specific concept. (There's Vorleben, but that's usually said by others about you, and with a negative connotation.) It's somewhat unfortunate that this word is so long; compared to the dramatic and catchy "I have no past", the German rendition sounds considerably less stylish, but that ...


0

I'm pretty positive that you don't translate street names, no matter what language they're in. But if you wanted to anyways, (for the sake of practicing cardinal directions, etc) it would be Südliche G Straße. (Assuming that by saying "Gee", you meant the letter 'G')


4

In casual speech I would also consider "Ehemaligentreffen" ("formers' gathering") the correct term – if you relate to people you were studying with. This type of event can either be an official gathering of students, invited by their university – or an inofficial at some bar – or everything inbetween. The rather formal term "Alumnitreffen" ("alumni ...


1

Also missing: Zum Himmel [nochmal] It's mostly used in questions Warum, zum Himmel, bist du da hingegangen? or Zum Himmel nochmal, warum bist du da hingegangen? There are also slight differences in the connotation: zum Himmel is more angry, um Gottes Willen is more scared.


4

If the homecoming you are referring to is with or in honor of alumni, the closest German translation that comes to my mind is das Ehemaligentreffen. If you enter Homecoming combined with Ehemaligentreffen in Google, you'll find some hits where German universities invite to their Ehemaligentreffen and also mention the term homecoming. So for the whole ...


4

I agree with the other posters, do not translate street names. Also, compass directions in street names are probably much more frequent in the US, where streets are arranged in a grid with some kind of center, and house numbers are counted from the center, so "1 south gee street" would be next to "1 north gee street". German cities generally don't have this ...


-1

In Germany, we don't combine street names with directions like north, south, east and west. Therefore South Gee Street is not so easy to translate. If Gee is the name of a Person and the street was named after that person, you may write "südliche Gee-Straße".


8

Since homecoming is an expression that has - to my knowledge - no counterpart in German, I would say something like Willst du mit mir zum Homecoming gehen? You could also use Hast du Lust, mit mir zum Homecoming zu gehen? Or, very politely Ich würde mich freuen, wenn du mich zum Homecoming begleitest/begleiten würdest. Update: I would ...


14

First of all, something regarding the adaption of place names in general: We only use adapted names for places that have been of historical importance to Germany – at least I do not know of any place name that has been adapted into German recently. In particular I do not know of any street whose name has been adapted. This rule does however not necessarily ...


10

Street Names are unambiguous, they are not to be translated. If you ask because you want to ship a package or a letter by post, you need to know this. Otherwise your shipment can not be delivered.


0

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/9144/dative-whom-with-accusative-who using accusative instead of dative , its correct to say: however, I do not know who I should contact for each of the two courses. however to contact is not "ansprechen". however, I don't know who I should contact, in order to get informations regarding each of the ...


0

Florian Diesch's answer is correct, but usually people talk a little more sloppy: Jedoch weiß ich nicht, wen ich für beide Kurse jeweils anschreiben soll.


3

I'd use Jedoch weiß ich nicht, wen ich für die beiden Kurse jeweils anschreiben soll.


7

In der Mathematik/Logik Kalkül


-1

I remember "verfassungsgebende Versammlung".


0

Ich kenne "Deduktionsregeln", das schließt (je nach Definition) manchmal die Axiome mit ein (als Regeln mit leerer Voraussetzung). "Ableitungsregeln" gibt es alternativ auch. "Deduktionssystem" gibt es auch, klingt aber eher nach Gewaltübersetzung. Ich persönlich würde - je nach Kontext - einfach "Deduktionsregeln" oder "System von Deduktionsregeln" oder so ...


3

I understand that you are looking for fantasy names, but if you want some realism there are a few things to consider: One of the most important functions of family names is to distinguish families within a community. So if ten families live together in a village on a mountain, their names are unlikely to refer to this rather obvious fact. Instead, they ...


6

A term related to "Jäger" is "Schütze" ("rifleman"). So you could call that man "Bergschütz" or "Waldschütz". The latter actually exists as a family name. Whether this is also true for the former I don't know. It has the advantage that it is closer to your intended meaning - and the disadvantage (in my eyes) that "Bergschützen" is often used as name for gun ...


3

Your composition is fine, but I think it suggests (due to the composition) that they're hunters, who primarily hunt in the hills. If you want them to be hunters in general, who simply come from the hills, I'd suggest (more freely) Die Jäger des Hügellandes Not quite the usual family name, but still: Tyson, Jäger des Hügellandes Sounds maybe a ...


3

Synonymous to Jäger in the non-military sense of the word (the people hunting for game) would be Weidmann or Waidmann. This is still referenced today in the greeting between hunters: "Waidmannsheil! - Waidmanndank!" It would avoid any military associations although I still don't feel comfortable with any composite words in this case (quite long to be a ...



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