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1

This is an instance in which German is actually logical. Die Menschen verändern normalerweise die Welt. Welche Menschen? Die Menschen, die verrückt genug sind, verändern normalerweise die Welt. In welchem Sinn verrückt genug? Die Menschen, die verrückt genug, um zu glauben, sind, verändern normalerweise die Welt. Was zu glauben? Die ...


1

I agree with @Vogel612 that the "um"-clause is a bit clumsy; however, for the sake of completeness it should be mentioned that the correct form with "um" would be: Die Menschen, die verrückt genug sind, um zu glauben, dass sie die Welt verändern können, verändern für gewöhnlich die Welt. So, you only missed the comma before dass and you applied a ...


4

In this case the latter sentence is the more correct one. I'd translate differently, though: Die Menschen, die verrückt genug sind zu glauben, dass sie die Welt verändern können, verändern normalerweise die Welt. This is a slight simplification over your sentence. You made it additionally difficult by introducing another subclause through "um". ...


0

Q1: Welcher Tag war am vergangenen Montag? Q2: Welcher Tag ist am kommenden Montag? Q3: Wie viele Montag gibt es? (I don't really understand that question...) Q4: Wie viele Tage hat der Jänner? Q5: Welcher Tag ist der 15. Jan.? I don't understand the last question... Maybe: Q6: Welches Datum hat der übernächste Montag?


1

Q1: Today is Jan. 15. What date was last Monday? Q1 Translated: Heute ist der 15. Januar. Welches Datum hatten wir letzten Montag? Q2: Today is Jan. 15. What date is next Monday? Q2 Translated: Heute ist der 15. Januar. Welches Datum ist am kommenden Montag? Q3: What do you mean? How many Mondays are in one full year? If yes: Q3: How many ...


0

Ergänzend erwähnt sei noch, dass dict.cc "to ask each in turn" als "reihum fragen" übersetzt. Darauf basierend eine mögliche Variante für deinen Satz: Reihum stellen die beiden Spieler sich gegenseitig eine beliebige Frage. Reihum stellen die Spieler einem anderen Spieler eine beliebige Frage.


2

English version here. Im Kontext von (Brett-)Spielen spricht man auch vom "Zug". Du bist am Zug! heißt, dass man dran ist. Es wird üblicherweise bei Spielen benutzt, bei denen man tatsächlich Dinge bewegt (zieht), z. B. Figuren oder Karten. Der Begriff wird aber auch breiter verwendet¹. Die zweite Hälfte deines Beispiels würde ich so übersetzen: ...


8

Absolut. Aber hier sind zwei Arten von turns im Spiel: in jeder Runde (= in each turn) ist die typische Formulierung in Spielanleitungen u.ä. Eine Runde bedeutet dabei so viel wie "jeder Spieler einmal". Das zugrundeliegende Bild dabei ist alle Spieler sitzen um einen Tisch -> wenn jeder Spieler einmal dran war, ging man gedacht auch einmal um den ...


2

Der Bindestrich sollte verwendet werden, um Wörter zu verbinden, die ansonsten auch zusammen-geschrieben oder zusammen gehören würden. Er kann damit zur Hervorhebung der beiden Bestandteile dienen. Im Gegensatz zu Subjektiven (Nichtwähler, Nichtbeachtung) geht bei Adjektiven und Verben (nichtamtliche Verlautbarung, nichteuropäische Einwanderer) die Tendenz ...


1

I'm from Berlin and we would vary the saying into "(Das) Schaffst du schon." "Das" can be left out. That makes it sound a little more colloquial than "Du schaffst es schon", maybe that is what you wanted to achieve with the "schaffst's" contraction. And I completely support the notion that you should switch off the spelling checker, because they ...


2

schön - beautiful, lovely schon - already, yet, before "Du schaffst das schon" / "Du schaffst es schon" - Are both valid in this case. "Du schaffst's schon" - It shouldn't be used in formal written conversations and its only rarely used in informal spoken conversations (as pointed out by guidot).


5

Ich würde nicht versuchen, die Übersetzung Struktur-äquivalent anzugehen. Mich reizt hier eher der Versuch, die beiden Sätze zu restrukturieren: Du glaubst nicht, wen ich heute getroffen habe! Deine Schwester! bzw. wem die gehobenere Sprache mehr zusagt: Du ahnst nicht, wen ich heute getroffen habe! Deine Schwester!


6

The closest match is: jmd./etw. betrachten als Betrachten can also be used in most other contexts for consider as Consider the following example -> Betrachten wir das nächste Besipiel. Your example: Ich betrachte ihn als meinen besten Freund. Halten is a more common substitute, but having a lot of other meanings as well, the context must resolve ...


5

You lot, you guys and you all/y'all are all primarily workarounds that English speakers employ because sometimes they want to make it clear they are addressing several people. This workaround was not necessary and therefore not used when English still distinguished between second person singular (thou) and plural (ye/you). But then people started to address ...


1

One aspect hasn't been made clear enough yet, I think: The English contractions discussed here are pretty much standard in spoken English (less so in written English). It is considered markedly formal to use the uncontracted forms in normal conversation (exception: for emphasis, as in: "I am sure" or similar). In German, it's the other way round: ...


4

being hungry The premise of your question is wrong (at least at the example “hungry”): eng: Tom is hungry. ger: Tom ist hungrig. There is just an alternate way do express the same, which is: ger: Tom hat Hunger. There is also a literal translation of this sentence into english, but in English this construction is bad style. It is: “Tom ...


2

The most common verb would be vorstellen. So in other words "I want to introduce him to her." would translate to "Ich möchte ihn ihr vorstellen."


4

I would not use Präsenz as it boils down to phyisical presence which is not what you mean. I'd suggest to use Anwesenheit and would say something like: Durch seine Herzlichkeit hat uns seine Anwesenheit stets mit Wärme erfüllt.


1

If someone is said to be a presence it sounds to me like an esoteric entity (think of a ghost or some kind of mystical power). In German - at least on my account - people would not say to be a presence in this context but rather say his/her presence. More generally speaking (not just about my feeling), saying someone is a presence focusses on this someone's ...


3

As it hasn't been mentioned by the others. One thing I want to add: The only contraction I can think of for "Ich bin" is "I bi(n)" as used in South German dialects (Bavaria/Austria). We use "I bi scho do" for "Ich bin schon da". But that is only used in spoken language. I cannot think of any written example (except folk literature, but that's special ...


19

The only reason I am can sound formal in English is that for entirely phonetic reasons the contraction I'm is used a lot. There are no such phonetic reasons for ich bin, consequently there is no such contraction, and consequently ich bin never got a chance to sound formal. Of course German also has contractions, they just affect different word combinations: ...


3

You’d never see it in writing, but in direct speech „ich bin” will often sound rather like „ch’bin“. So you can do that, if you’re confident in your „ch”! Additionally, I want to reinforce what has already been mentioned: Omitting the „ich“ entirely is done very frequently, even in colloquial texting (SMS to friends etc). E.g. „Bin gleich da“, which might ...


8

There is something similar. In colloquial language you can omit the "ich", so you can say Bin gerade sehr beschäftigt. instead of Ich bin gerade sehr beschäftigt.


8

Even in colloquial conversation with German friends, you hear "ich bin" all the time


27

The German ich bin is neither formal nor informal. It.. just is. So you can use ich bin in every situation. The same applies to Er ist, du bist etc. Nevertheless, as already mentioned, German does have contractions and colloquially used short forms. To mention some of them: Was gibt's? = Was gibt es? Wo bist'n du? = Wo bist denn du? (equal to "Wo ...


9

The German word still has the original meaning that was borrowed from Greek. pathetisch Bedeutung: übertrieben oder aufgesetzt gefühlvoll, leidenschaftlich Herkunft: über spätlateinisch patheticus → la von altgriechisch παθητικός (pathētikós) → grc „erhaben, feierlich“, einer Ableitung zum Substantiv πάθος (pathos) → grc „Pathos“ The English ...


3

My knowledge about the history of these words in German and English is limited, but I am a native speaker of both German and modern Greek and studied ancient Greek until a few years ago. It is certain, that both of these derive from ancient Greek ΠΑΘΗΤΙΚΟΣ. Liddell-Scott in the associated lemma claims that the word originally covered the following senses: ...


1

You can't exactly translate times 1:1 between Languages. Their usages do differ. All the mistakes have been noted by hellcode in the comments already, just for completeness: 1. I am eating an apple = Ich essse einen Apfel 2. I had ate an apple = wrong english. I ate an apple = Ich aß einen Apfel 6. I will have been eating an apple = Ich werde einen ...


2

Ich werde versuchen, die Daten nebenher zu erfassen. "Nebenher" something that's done alongside, without halting or hindering a simultaneous process.


2

on-the-fly can have many different translations. Here are a few that come to my mind: Ad-hoc ("Ich beantworte die Rückfragen ad-hoc, ohne mich vorher darauf vorzubereiten." - I'll answer questions on-the-fly without preparation.) Aus dem Stegreif (same context as ad-hoc) In Echtzeit ("Die Daten werden in Echtzeit aufbereitet." - The data is prepared ...


5

If you're working in an IT environment, you can write: Ich werde versuchen die Daten während der Laufzeit aufzuzeichnen*. or Ich werde versuchen die Daten zur Laufzeit aufzuzeichnen. *("aufzunehmen" would work, too) Whereas "aufzeichnen/aufnehmen" is usually translated as "record" and "zur/während der Laufzeit" as "during runtime". On a ...


5

Especially when you're talking about processing data, you could use "in Echtzeit" (in real-time, without latency).


3

You could as well ask if the seat is not free. From my experience I hear this a lot more on my daily commute to the office: Sitzt hier schon jemand? Which would mean something along this line: "Is someone already sitting here?" Or "Is this seat already taken?"



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