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Electronic engineering is a subfield of electrical engineering (Elektrotechnik). In Germany, usually people who do electronic engineering are called Elektrotechniker or Elektroingenieure (if holding a university degree). Elektroniker are usually people who just have a vocational training and install/repair radios, TVs, etc. Elektronik usually only refers ...


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You would say Elektronik. The translation you found is indeed correct.


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Both in English and German, this is a Partizipialsatz/participle clause. You can use it both with the present active and the past passive participle. It's not a relative clause, because there's no relative pronoun. I wouldn't call it an aposition, even though it describes or explains a word in more detail, because one distinguishing feature of an aposition ...


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Yes, but you have to keep in mind a subtle difference between squeezing out toothpaste out of its tube and squeezing out people out of a stadium at the end of a game (in English as well an in German). Squeezing toothpaste out of a tube This is not done by the toothpaste itself. Somebody else has to do it: Gerald squeezed an inch of toothpaste out ...


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Depending on the context i would prefer to use: verdrängen (here you can find detailed explanation and Examples) or herausdrängen which may mean displace, push out or push away!


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von etw. Gebrauch machen is indeed one of the possible translations of "make use of sth.". Nonetheless, it does not really fit in your actual context. If you want to express "make use of sth." in a sense of exploiting, you must use: etw. ausnutzen Further, your translations of "noticing" and "instruction" are not really correct either. I think it ...


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[I hope an answer in German is fine; in a nutshell: you can try a neologism, but there is no intuitive good one.] Es gibt m.W. tatsächlich keinen etablierten „deutscheren“ Begriff für case-[in]sensitive, also für die Unterscheidung von Groß- und Kleinbuchstaben. Man könnte allerdings einen Neologismus bilden: Von bspw. context-sensitive wissen wir, dass ...


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Keep case-sensitive as a foreign word, or use a ‎supporting sentence instead of a participle construction ("wobei Groß- und Kleinschreibung unterschieden wird"). As usual, the best actual choice depends on the context. In general, you can find examples on linguee.de. I've never seen a German term for this. For your example I'd write: Wie bei allen ...


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Observation: All text processors at hand use one of these or close variants. If in search of a click box label within a search dialog I find a ≠ A quite international and hard to beat. There is of course no guarantee, to find a phrase with similar elegance for any concept in two different languages. While lower case and upper case strongly point in ...


3

Riesen- often works, but not always. You can't say Riesen-Dieb, but Riesen-Arschloch (=big ashole), Riesen-Depp (=big idiot) or Riesen-Sache (=big deal) are common. Verdammter Dieb, verdammtes Arschloch and verdammter Depp would work, too. But it's uncommon to say eine verdammte Sache. You would say instead eine verdammt große Sache or eine verdammt ...


5

In this scenario, context would be used to differentiate the two. There really isn't a way to decide between ihre as their and ihre as her. In fact, if it weren't written down, you would equally be able to say that sentence translates to "you are taking your clothes from me." If I were speaking and what I was trying to say was ambiguous, I would phrase the ...


2

The best answer depends a bit on the use case. If you’re learning German and need a way to express intensity in a (mildly) foul way, I’d suggest to adopt the prefix Scheiß- lit. ‘shit, shitty’ – which may also mean ‘bad’ – for where you‘d say bloody in British or fucking in American English. (I don’t know what Canadians, Australians, Indians etc. would ...


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You might form the compound with Scheiß-, hence Scheißdieb (which, beware, means shitty). Or adjectivation, as alredy pointed out, with verdammt.


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“Ich arbeite in der Uni.” You work inside the university building. You could be a student, a chef, a professor, or even a painter … “Ich arbeite aus die der Uni.” This one does not make sense. “Ich arbeite bei der Uni.” You are an employee of the university.


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in der Uni - would mean inside (location). aus die Uni - is incorrect. bei der Uni - doesn't sound natural. I work at the University. (Correct) Ich arbeite an der Uni. You would use bei if you are talking about a company. Ich arbeite bei einer Firma.


3

Your general idea is right but you made a mistake. [..] lässt er sich Schüler verstehen [..] is not understandable. The word sich symbolizes that the teacher does this for him- or herself. For this fragment, you don't need any reflexive component, so [..] lässt er die Schüler verstehen [..] would be the correct translation. You also made ...


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Ich finde 3 Stellen, die salopp als Denglisch bezeichnet werden könnten, zwei davon sind darüber hinaus schlicht falsch: dass der Frage stellender nicht "the", sondern "an" in der ersten Hälfte meint. dass der Frage stellender das Zustandekommen des Buches Es gibt im Deutschen den Fragesteller, der hier zu der Fragesteller bzw. der ...



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