Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Just wanted to add something to Hubert's answer, since I can't comment (not enough reputation) I'll just answer here. "Ich werde im Fernsehen sein zu sehen sein." and "Er/Sie/Es wird im Fernsehen sein zu sehen sein." is wrong because of the double usage of "sein" Just using: "Ich werde im Fernsehen zu sehen sein." and "Er/Sie/Es wird ...


16

Colloquial: Ich bin im Fernsehen. (I am on TV.) Ich werde im Fernsehen sein. (I will be on TV.) Er/Sie/Es ist im Fernsehen. (He/She/It is on TV.) Er/Sie/Es wird im Fernsehen sein. (He/She/It will be on TV.) Better style: Ich bin im Fernsehen zu sehen. Ich werde im Fernsehen zu sehen sein. Er/Sie/Es ist im Fernsehen zu sehen. ...


2

Old question, but I want to point out that the Austrian army (Bundesheer) still uses “Habt Acht!” as the standard command for standing at attention, apparently equivalent to the German army’s “Achtung!” The Habt-Acht-Stellung (or Habacht-Stellung) is characterized by closed legs, body tension, arms placed at the side of the body with loosely closed fists ...


0

This phrase is common in football (= soccer) as an expression to denote the display of fancy skills by a player. Most of the time it is meant as criticism, for instance by the coach, meaning that the player should do something simpler and more effective instead.



Top 50 recent answers are included