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7

You would not normally put "frei" at the beginning of the sentence. It's not technically wrong, but simply unidiomatic most of the time, very much like the English "free I am". Unless you're really stressing that point (or want to imitate Yoda) go with options #1 and #3. "Ich habe frei" means that you're off, on vacation, not working or in school that day. ...


7

The literal translation of the two is: Das geht leider nicht - This is not possible / This won't work Es geht leider nicht - It is not possible / It won't work The usages are the same as in English, depending on the context you may want to use one or the other


0

I know this phrase almost exclusively in the context of football - although it's likely the origin is music/dance related. When used by a football commentator/reporter it usually refers to one team "dancing around" their opponents' defense in a - for football standards - artistic/agile fashion. Playing the ball with the tip is rather uncommon (because you ...


5

Hacke, Spitze, Hacke, Spitze, eins, zwei, drei is an old childrens play-verse/song that exists in plenty of varieties, sometimes also "Hacke, Spitze, hoch das Bein!" or "Ein Hut, ein Stock ein Regenschirm...vorwärts, rückwärts, seitwärts, stehn." Core idea is that the text gives the instructions, not unlike in linedancing. Hacke is the heel of the foot, ...


2

Was noch nicht eindeutig geklärt wurde, war die zweite Frage im Bezug auf "Tut tut tut …": Während "Toi, toi, toi" ein Ausdruck ist, der quasi "Viel Glück" oder "Ich drück dir die Daumen" bedeutet, ist das englische "Tut, tut, tut …" eine Weise, Missfallen auszudrücken. Tut tut tut, Robin, you disappoint me. Auch wenn es von der Form ähnlich ist, ist ...


2

Putting the name behind an utterance as an address is common in spoken but not in written German. It shows, that you haven't thought about the address in beforehand which is perfectly ok in spoken language, but should be avoided in written German. That being said, it's totally appropriate in casual conversation between friends or family. In formal ...


3

"Gruß aus Berlin, John!" sounds to my (Austrian) ears rather prosaic and almost like an order. "Herzlichen Glückwunsch zum Geburtstag, John!" isn't much better. I suggest to use: Hi / Hallo / Lieber John, herzliche Grüße aus Berlin! Hi / Hallo / Lieber John, herzlichen Glückwunsch zum Geburtstag! You might want to use a formula like Lieber / Hallo ...


3

What you are seeing is one of the four cases in German, the genitive case. It is known as "Wes-Fall", because it is used in sentences which provide an answer to a "whose" question. To form the genitive for "the X of the Y", you follow the schema [article in Nominativ] X [article in Genitiv] Y+s The articles in genitive are des for masculine and ...



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