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Simple, non-derived words have to be learned together with their inherent gender. They often have just one syllable or a complex one followed by a weak schwa syllable (or syllabic sonorant) and occur quite frequently. Derivation rules The rightmost part of a compound always determines its gender and its noun class (for inflection). This rightmost part may ...


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Writing der die Komplexität des französischen Eisenbahnnetzes und Verwaltung navigierte sounds a bit incomplete to me. I would suggest an other construction for your sentence. But first let me fix the beginning of your sentence (like Carster Schultz already pointed out). Danke an meiner Reporterin, XYZ There are several problems with this. For ...


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The singular form is das Bächlein and, as you correctly state, this is a neuter diminutive that ends in -lein; die Bächlein is the plural form. For completeness, here is the declension table for the noun Bächlein: Singular: Plural: Nom.: das Bächlein die Bächlein Gen.: des Bächleins der Bächlein Dat.: dem Bächlein den Bächlein ...


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As a general rule, the gender (+ number) of the pronoun in the following sentence is determined by the gender of the noun it is referring to. However, there may be some deviations: (1) Das Mädchen weint. Es ist traurig. (2) Das Mädchen weint. Sie (?) ist traurig. Variant (1) is correct in any case. Sometimes you can read sentences like in (2). ...


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Personal pronouns stand for nouns, they always match case, number and gender. Das Mädchen weint. Es (das Mädchen) ist traurig. Die Stadt ist schön. Sie(die Stadt) gefällt mir. If you now have a noun witch is a proper noun, the case, number and gender matches too: Ich studiere an der HU. Sie (die HU) ist eine tolle Uni. Ich war gestern in Frankfurt und ...


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I think the best way to approach the gender issue of the word cat, is to think of it as a generic feminine (compare roughly to Hebamme, Maus or Ente), just like, e.g., Schüler is a generic masculine. Thus, unless the context makes clear that Katze refers to female cats, you must specify this, e.g., using the adjektiv weiblich. Some examples (with an example ...


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It really depends on the context. Reason: Katze really has two definitions, one being the type of animal and the other referring to it being female. In regular speech, if you don't necessarily put attention on the gender, Katze is more common. But it's also a matter of preference. If you say Katerina instead, it should be no problem (unless you're talking ...


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Katze is used as standard for both genders, if you emphasize it being a Kater, you are a crazy old cat lady. ;) Wir haben eine Katze. Wir haben einen Hund. Wir haben ein Kaninchen. Funny thing, our vet always refers to animals as "him", independent of the gender, so it doesn't seem to matter what you use. Don't remember what he used when he ...


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We Germans often just say Katze in normal conversations, as Kater may sound like you really want to point out that your cat is male. In a formal letter and in a normal letter, it is a bit more common to write Katze or Kater, depending on the sex. So for answering your question, Katze should be totally fine if the other person doesn't care about the sex of ...


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As personal pronouns stand for nouns, they are supposed to be of matching case, number and gender. When it comes to proper nouns, it's not that simple: But the first one is not quite one, rather a practical mixture, since it's "head" is a common noun - of which you know the gender. Luckily, cities are always replaced with the neuter personal pronoun(s) - ...



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