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The verb "geben" usually comes with two object, a thing given and an entity given to. You can technically skip one or even both object but you need a REALLY good context for it. If it is just an isolated sentence it will appear as if there's something missing to most people. Unsere Beziehung ist aus der Ballance. Du nimmst. Ich gebe. (both objects ...


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If you really, really wanted to say "I pass on the flower that a woman gave to me" using only the words in your example, then you would have to say Ich gebe die Rose einer Frau. And then you would almost certainly be misunderstood, because using 'geben' without a direct object is very uncommon, and the genitive you are using is exactly the same form ...


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The adjective überdrüssig is used with the genitive or (alternatively and less common) with the accusative to express that someone is weary of or fed up with something. Why the genitive? Well, that's just the way it is... In the sentence you quote überdrüssig is used as a noun: "die Überdrüssigen" = "die überdrüssigen Menschen". So alle des Staates ...


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überdrüssig can be used with Genitive or Dative, but it will have different meanings: Ich bin des Freundes überdrüssig. (I'm fed up with the friend) Ich bin dem Freunde überdrüssig. (The friend is fed up with me) http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/ueberdruessig


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The genitive forms of the pronouns are "meiner", "deiner", "seiner", "ihrer", "seiner", "unser", "euer", "ihrer", so it's "anstatt seiner". Note, however, that all the genitive forms are relatively uncommon in colloquial speech.


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I think you have (at least) three possibilities here: You take the genitive of the personal pronoun (male, singular) which is seiner: Anstatt seiner habe ich sie gewählt. Since nobody uses the genitive form seiner in every-day speech, you can use the dative form ihm; my guess is that is the most common version but prescriptivists won't like it: Anstatt ...


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I assume that the verb construction jemand einer Sache berauben is influenced by Latin or modelled after Latin. The Latin grammar has a chapter about ablative of separation where the construction of verbs such as orbare, privare, spoliare, exuere, all of them meaning berauben, plus ablative is explained. Egere/ indigere could have ablative or genitive. As ...


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I cannot provide an etymological reason for the cases the verb berauben rules. However, I have the feeling that the main cause lies in the prefix be-. Let's analyze the cases of berauben and rauben: jemandem (Dat.) etwas (Akk.) rauben jemanden (Akk.) einer Sache (Gen.) berauben We can see that the prefix be- shifted the accusative case from the ...


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The genitive is only used for the object that's robbed of somebody: Der Räuber (nom.) hat den Mann (acc.) seiner Brieftasche (gen.) beraubt Also note that this is high register and a very formal way of putting it. It's actually much more common to use the passive here: Dem Mann (dat.) wurde die Brieftasche (nom.) geraubt (Also, it's common not ...


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Laut Duden wird das Fugen-s bei bestimmten Endungen der ersten Wortkomponente verwendet: -tum, -ing, -ling, -heit, -keit, -schaft, -ung, -ion, -tät, -at oder -um. Beispiele sind Mannschaftswettbewerb, Bewerbungstraining, Heiterkeitsausbruch, Religionswissenschaft, Wissenschaftsrat, Forschungserfolg, Irrtumswahrscheinlichkeit. Link: Dudeneintrag Komposita


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I'm not an expert, however mit is a preposition that always requires the dative. The sentence in the textbook is correct: Mit heißem Tee


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I'm sure Duden knows what he says. But I would avoid "eine Tasse heißen Tees". That reminds me too much of the language of Schiller, two hundred years ago. And I would also avoid "eine Tasse heißem Tee". That sounds very awkward to me. I would simply say "Ich möchte einen heißen Tee", to avoid the problem with adjective + noun after a noun describing ...


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Both examples are correct. The second one is considered elevated or refined language. Duden – Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007: Substantivierte Adjektive und Partizipien nach Mengenangaben stehen gewöhnlich im Genitiv: (…) Dagegen weisen singularische Substantive nach Mengen- und Maßangaben heute gewöhnlich denselben Kasus wie ...



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