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45

"Ich liebe dich" is stronger and more profound than "Ich habe dich lieb". The difference is hard, if not impossible, to translate to English, or only with some extra language acrobatics; but in German, there is indeed a difference. "Ich habe dich lieb" is commonly used among somewhat close and beloved family members, such as towards ...


23

Willkürlich has two different meanings: bewusst, vom eigenen Willen gesteuert (voluntary, deliberately) This one is the exact opposite of unwillkürlich (involuntary). The second meaning, auf Willkür beruhend (arbitrary) is rather different, because the word "Willkür" has shifted in meaning over the years. It used to mean doing something of your ...


23

Deine Mudda is just an intentionally misspelled Deine Mutter (your mother) to phonetically mimic the pronunciation of this phrase by a low-educated street bully. Joking viciously about your mother is an indirect way to insult you: if your mother is so bad, you seem to be even worse. The typical jokes include some negative comparisons of smb's mother with ...


23

In addition to Alexander's answer, I would like to add that simply replying "Deine Mudda!" means something like "Get lost!". Of course, as with all youth slang, usage probably varies highly by region and even social circle. This is shortened from a form of exchange often seen among adolescents: "Du schuldest mir noch zehn Euro." - "Deine Mutter schuldet ...


23

One reason you are having difficulties finding an adequate dictionary entry is because Kärtchen is what is known as a diminutive form. One of the diminutive endings -chen or -lein, when added to nouns, makes the modified noun smaller, cuter, or (less often) laughable. (Unfortunately for many words one of the two diminutives is much more common than the ...


18

It basically tells your audience you like drinking Cognac. Whether or not that's bad is for you to decide. Both "Jäckchen" and "Cognac-chen" are diminutive forms, of "Jacke" (jacket) and "Cognac", respectively. And they rhyme. Both a jacket and Cognac would warm you up, hence the question about warmth. The joke is that "Cognac-chen" sounds like a compound ...


17

Your interpretation is not correct. The main problem is that "Und ob!" is a fixed idiom that means "You bet!" So the structure of the passage in question is: Will man das wirklich? - "Und ob!", sagen vier Jungbauern. Do you really want that? - "You bet!" four junior farmers say. What follows (... die sich ... entschieden haben.) is just a normal ...


16

08/15 - "null-acht fünfzehn", sometimes sloppily pronounced "null-acht fuffzehn" - is a rather colloquial expression and means "nothing special, average, business as usual" like the English "run-of-the-mill." You can use it with all kind of words, people, things, abstract concepts etc. Other German words and expression meaning the same are Allerwelts-... ...


16

"Ein Erlebnis" is something you experience, like an event: Diese Reise war ein Erlebnis. Ich habe letzte Nacht ein furchtbares Erlebnis gehabt. It is from "erleben", which means to experience something. It typically describes exciting things. The mentioned voyage was definitely not boring. This does not necessarily mean it was good, though without ...


16

I guess the “-” in “gestern-heute” is not meant as a hyphen, but rather as a dash. So it should be written “gestern – heute”. Both words are used here in a figurative sense, representing past and present. So I would expect the article to contrast past and present aspects of the 9/11 attack. A word gestern-heute or gesternheute doesn’t exist, as Grantwalzer ...


15

The expression "08/15" is used in colloquial German to express that procedures or objects are on average or mediocre. "Dieses Verfahren ist 08/15" - This procedure is pretty standard The use of "08/15" goes back to world war I when for the first time all German soldiers had a standard machine gun of the type MG 08/15. Not only was this gun on average ...


15

My trial for the transliteration: In []-brackets I give characters I cannot determine with certainty or that are not present in the original text but are required for the sake of grammar and punctuation. My best guesses are written without the ?-sign, forms and words where I am very unsure are denoted with a ?-sign. Das ist unser Haus[.] das ...


15

They're saying „Ausstieg links/rechts“. Ausstieg is a noun derivative from the verb aussteigen. Basically they're just telling you on which side to get out, i.e. where the exit is.


13

The sentence plays with two meanings of verkehrt: verkehrt as in Sie sind hier verkehrt! (You are wrong here!) verkehrt as in Wir verkehren nicht mit diesen Leuten! (We do not keep company with these people!) If you substitute the 1st one with falsch for example, the sentence would be easier to understand: Selbst wer dort, wo alles falsch verkehrt, ...


13

Originally, "thou" was used if you were addressing a single person, whereas "you" was used for addressing more people. Thou was saved only for intimate or disrespectful uses. So really it was more like "thou" was the same as "du", and "you" was the same as "ihr." Sources: Wikipedia's article about Thou


13

Someone is schön blöd by doing something stupid; though the person should/could have known better, or because of being stubborn. It's always his/her own fault. For example: when you pay more for something than necessary because you are too lazy to walk a few meters. when you let a great opportunity slip. when you do more work than necessary. when you lose ...


13

Entstanden ist der 56 Hektar große See als eine Schottergrube der Baufirma Schwarzl Beton durch Grundwasser geflutet wurde. 1984 konnte das Freizeitzentrum als Nachnutzung des Schottertagebaus eröffnet werden. Es beherbergt neben dem Badesee die sogenannte „Steiermark-Halle“ mit Gastronomiebetrieben und die „Davis-Cup-Halle“, in der regelmäßig der ...


13

This is a temporary answer to give the community an opportunity to decipher the handwriting. Please feel free to edit this post whenever you feel you found out a missing word. Of course this should be followed by another answer giving the translation, and a guess on the temporal origin if possible. Vom Meiſter Huſſen dem Ketzer dz(?) der zu ͦ Coſtentz ...


12

As far as I know, in English you have these gradations (I'm a German native speaker, so I'm not absolutely sure if there are more): this is the weaker end of the list I like you. I love you. this is the stronger end of the list In German you can say it this ways: this is the weaker end of the list Ich mag dich. Ich hab' dich gern. ...


12

So is one of the most complicated words in German. The Grimm has dozens (if not hundreds) of pages (the link generator is somewhat broken - follow the link, search for "so", and click on the second "so" entry) on this word. "So" can be an adverb, a conjunction or a particle. Most of the uses are the adverb. From the chat: Also, das deutsche und englische ...


12

"Pleasant" is too general for my taste. Dict.cc gives the words "comfortable" and "cozy", which are better translations in my opinion. Note also that "Gemütlichkeit" not only describes an atmosphere but also a state of mind, something like "laziness" but not so strong. By using the word for your work place, you essentially say that you have (and use) the ...


11

You're right with your assumption about the meaning. It means that someone can not follow or does not understand a conversation or what it is about. Another common subject on which this can be used is the plot of a movie or maybe a play or similar. In this case the meaning is explained above, but can also include, that the plot isn't making sense to the ...


11

From a discussion on dict.leo.org: Just over thirty kilometers. When combined with something countable, gut means slightly more (it's opposite being knapp, which means slightly less).


11

The word in question is probably räsonieren: (bildungssprachlich) sich wortreich äußern, sich [überflüssigerweise] über etwas auslassen (umgangssprachlich) seinem Unmut, seiner Unzufriedenheit durch [ständiges] Schimpfen Ausdruck geben (veraltet) vernünftig reden, Schlüsse ziehen Duden This means: to make wordy explanations, to argue, to ...


11

By using the suffix "-gerecht" we can build an adjective from a noun to expresses that something meets criteria for defined usage ("Etwas wird seiner Sache gerecht"). In a technical context from cast iron I would translate "Beanspruchung" with strain. Thus "Beanspruchungsgerecht" would translate to something like: "to meet requirements for strain"


11

This "question" has been posted on at least three different sections of Stack Exchange (Spanish and French as well as German). I'm not sure whether it's a joke or a serious project. If it's intended seriously, then I must say that in my opinion it's hopeless. To try to give the reason in one sentence: letters are not phonetically consistent in different ...


11

heute is the adverb form as in Heute gehen wir zum Labor (= Today we're going to the lab) heutig is the adjective form that in German is used to say "today's" Das heutige Wetter ist schlecht (Today's weather is bad) Der heutige Mensch ist stärker als zuvor (=Today's man/person is stronger than before) heutigen is declined form of "heutig"


10

I guess the title alludes to Philippians 2,2, which reads in German: dann macht meine Freude dadurch vollkommen, dass ... The English Standard Version has: complete my joy by ..., so your translation is fine. Grün's German publisher Herder translates the title as Joy will be perfect (see herder.de/foreign_rights) and informs us that ...



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