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9

»Sie« is the pronoun for feminine words. »Die Tasche« is feminine (its article in nominative singular is »die«). So, if you use a pronoun to refer to a female word like »die Tasche«, then you have to use the female pronoun »sie«. Also remember: Not the thing itself is female. The word is female. The words »Auto«, »Wagen« and »Karre« are German synonyms for ...


0

The source, a book by Hugo Goldschmidt published in 1892, says mehrentheils. The OCR software used there clearly doesn't handle Fraktur very well.


-3

As I can't imagine that there is absolutely no connection between picture and inscription I would, judging by your description of the picture, rather make an educated guess in the direction of courtly love where the Troubadours have to woo for the favor of their sweetheart. And the choice of the mistress is strongly biased and influenced by the skills of ...


5

The inscription would be Erst prob's, dann lob's! meaning "try it first, then praise it." It seems a pretty common inscription for German beersteins.


4

The inscription should read: Erst prob’s, dann lob’s. It is a saying recommending to first try something (proben, probieren) before (possibly) appraising it. Regarding the pictures, I don’t think they are related to the inscription specifically. A web search for the phrase turns up quite a number of steins with varying decorations.


0

i think the meaning of obligated router ist nearly the correct meaning.


5

While not completely implausible as an obsolete German word, it's still quite implausible, and I am sure it's not what nichtentheils is. If this word had ever existed, it would appear in modern editions with the modernised spelling nichtenteils. But this spelling is completely unknown to Google. I looked at the few Google Books hits for nichtentheils. Every ...


1

Supposing the word "nichtentheils" ever existed: It's possible that "nichtentheils" has later been modified to "nichtenteils" as many Names and Words which now are written only with a "t" have been eralier written with "th" like: Thal=Tal. This contains at least two words we actually use: "nichts" nothing and "Teil" Piece/Part or "nichtens" which is more ...


1

I'm a German native speaker, English is a foreign language to me. I would have thought “Ich rieche dich” would translate to “I (can) smell you”. But obviously you are not happy with it. I just can compare the phrase with others: Ich sehe dich Light from a light source is reflected by your body. Some of this reflected light reaches my eyes, where it is ...


5

You could say, "children [...] don't give a damn about the worries and problems of adults."


2

It generally means that you really don't care about something or are really inconsiderate (in a conscious way). So in this case it means that the children are inconsiderate about the worries and problems of adults :)


5

The text states that the fragment is of great interest because it, like L and Ψ, gives the shorter ending of the Gospel of Mark first. More or less the only structural difference between the German and English sentences is the position of the verb, which is (usually) at the end in German subordinate clauses.


9

The German word still has the original meaning that was borrowed from Greek. pathetisch Bedeutung: übertrieben oder aufgesetzt gefühlvoll, leidenschaftlich Herkunft: über spätlateinisch patheticus → la von altgriechisch παθητικός (pathētikós) → grc „erhaben, feierlich“, einer Ableitung zum Substantiv πάθος (pathos) → grc „Pathos“ The English ...


3

My knowledge about the history of these words in German and English is limited, but I am a native speaker of both German and modern Greek and studied ancient Greek until a few years ago. It is certain, that both of these derive from ancient Greek ΠΑΘΗΤΙΚΟΣ. Liddell-Scott in the associated lemma claims that the word originally covered the following senses: ...



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