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1.) Der Patient entwickelte einer Lebensmittelvergiftung? I'm not a doctor, so this might be how doctors talk about it, however eine Krankheit entwickeln (developing a illness) feels wrong. Also your native speaker completely ignored that it's about the symptoms, not the actual illness (symptoms that fit illness A might actually be caused by illness ...


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Der Patient entwickelte Symptome einer Lebensmittelvergiftung. I think you just missed the noun Symptome (symptoms) here. Das Dach des Tunnels tropfte. The term leckte Wasser is not that much used in german as far as I know. A commonly used synonym is the verb tropfen. Diese Straße trägt einen großen Teil des Verkehrs. Straße is a female ...


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I know this phrase almost exclusively in the context of football - although it's likely the origin is music/dance related. When used by a football commentator/reporter it usually refers to one team "dancing around" their opponents' defense in a - for football standards - artistic/agile fashion. Playing the ball with the tip is rather uncommon (because you ...


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erlernen is an interesting derivation of lernen - or better a "specification". While lernen can be used to express learning pretty much anything, erlernen is almost exclusively used with regard to learning a skill or job and thus also implies a certain level of complexity of the subject that has been learned. (The term x-handwerk is also used very often in ...


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In this case the difference is not related to tenses. Erlernen and lernen are two different verbs. More often than not er can be identified with a (non-separable) prefix that implies to do the things until the goal is reached ("Vorsilbe, die eine zielgerichtete Handlung ausdrückt"). Hence, erlernen is to learn something until you master it, while lernen ...


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Hacke, Spitze, Hacke, Spitze, eins, zwei, drei is an old childrens play-verse/song that exists in plenty of varieties, sometimes also "Hacke, Spitze, hoch das Bein!" or "Ein Hut, ein Stock ein Regenschirm...vorwärts, rückwärts, seitwärts, stehn." Core idea is that the text gives the instructions, not unlike in linedancing. Hacke is the heel of the foot, ...


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I think in this case it depends too much on the previous sentence. If I were to translate it maybe I'd try a more freely translated version: However, your sister doesn't live in Kiel, does she/right?


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I think the more pronounced "Your sister does not live in Kiel, does she?" might match it a bit better (although i am a native german speaker, not english, so i might be wrong). The "aber" here usually is a request for clarification, or a hint at a misunderstanding or confusion. It most likely means that the speaker previously held the impression that the ...


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Your translation is correct but it would also be correct if aber was missing from the original. What it can signify here is the speaker thinking of something or questioning an assumption they made. If this is the context, you could carry it over in translation like this: Wait, your sister doesn't live in Kiel, does she? Another reason for putting aber ...


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The "aber" probably really just means "but" here. But your sister doesn't live in Kiel, does she? So it indicates that the answer that you expect ("She doesn't live in Kiel") somehow contradicts what has been said before or would otherwise be unexpected. So, for example, imagine that a friend reports meeting his sister in Kiel. But you think you ...



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