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3

In der Patentschrift ist von zwei Trennkörpern die Rede, die beide den Stromfluss unterbinden. Einer wird für das Ausschalten verwendet, der zweite tritt bei Überlastung des Stromkreises in Aktion, indem er das Einschalten verhindert. Als Übersetzung scheint mir separating object angemessen oder separating part.


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The first example probably needs the information on who is walking, and I would not force that into passive. If you say "Es wird zum Supermarkt gegangen" it sounds like you stress the "walking" part (e.g, as opposed to driving) and that you order others to do it. Wir gehen zum Supermarkt. We'll go to the supermarket. The 2nd example, "Es wird ...


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The phrase literally means ownership instead of rent. It’s hard to tell without further context, but you may have seen an offer for buying a home, combined with a loan. In that case, you would pay a certain amount regularly for the next ten or fifteen or twenty years until you have paid back the loan and the home is yours.


3

"Backpfeife" = "a slap"; "Gesicht" = "face"; so the literal translation would be "Slapface". Meaning: somebody is so ugly that he should be slapped. But it has other meanings depending on the context and region. Similar words: Gesichtsgrätsche


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In the KJV the verse is Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. In the NIV it's Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak. So, it's clear here that Wachen is watching, not waking. The German Luther bible has Wachet ...


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Today, the originally referred bible text reads as Wacht und betet, damit ihr nicht in Versuchung geratet. Der Geist ist willig, aber das Fleisch ist schwach. So "wachen" is not so much to be understood as "stay awake", which would be the literal translation, but rather "stay alert and pray, so that you don't yield to temptation"


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I would recommend just saying she is celebrating her 30th birthday, 40th birthday, etc. and likewise Happy 40th Birthday, Happy 30th Birthday, etc. I believe we (Americans at least) tend to more use the number, then have a special term for every birthday in that category. People understand from the number that it is rounded, and, therefore, a more ...


3

I think it depends on the original meaning of the English sentence. If it refers to the social or professional status, I would translate it like that: Er schaut auf jene herab, die unter ihm stehen. (in German, unter jemandem stehen is a common phrase to express social or professional status differences, besides the usual meaning of designating where an ...


4

You cannot translate that to Er schaut auf jene herab, die er besser als ist - it's not grammatical. One might translate that to Er schaut auf jene herab, die schlechter sind als er. but I'm afraid that this would slightly change the meaning - while you can say "besser" to indicate a general superiority (higher social status, better educated, richer, more ...


2

"Ankleiden" is the action of actually dressing up - From naked to fully in clothes. Mainly used in the reflexive form, but you can also dress up someone else. Works only for actual clothing. "Bekleiden" has the general meaning of "to cover" - Can be used for putting someone else into clothing, i.e dressing up someone else Describing the action that ...


3

First off, note that both words are not used a lot in colloquial. These are rather formal words. However, in this case, as so often, it's important to understand how the prefixes an- and be- affect the meaning. Admittedly, it's hard to grasp for be-. But basically the prefixes are the opposites to aus- and ent-. The word pair an-/aus- is pretty simple. ...


2

They are not exact synonyms. For example, in figural speech, you can "ein Amt bekleiden" (hold an office) but you cannot "ein Amt ankleiden". Ankleiden means the act of putting on a dress. (change from undressed to dressed) Bekleiden is rather used figuratively ("ein Amt bekleiden") or in the form "mit etwas bekleidet sein" (to wear something).


7

It’s a handwritten book of advice and instructions for the education of her son Erich II (Regierungshandbuch) by Elisabeth von Brandenburg from 1545. On the front side is her name ELISABET VON GOTS GNADEN GEBORN AUS KONIGLICHEM STAM DENMARK SCHWEDEN NORWEGEN MARGGRAVIN HERTZOGEN ERICHS FRAW GROSMUTTER / Elizabeth by the Grace of God born of Royal Blood ...


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I feel embarrassed for him/her. He/she is embarrassing. I’m embarrassed for him/her.


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The meanings are basically the same. Use vergleichen if someone compares two things, not including themselves: Er vergleicht das neue Samsung-Smartphone mit dem iPhone. Er vergleicht sein Testergebnis mit dem Ergebnis seines Nachbarn. Use sich vergleichen if someone compares themselves with something else: Er vergleicht sich mit seinem Boss. ...


11

It is a "trick riddle" with the sole purpose to get the answerer to say something that the asker can "hear" as an invitation to pinch, poke or beat the unsuspecting victim. Especially children find this funny. Haumich, while seemingly used as a name, is a contraction of "hau' mich" (= beat me). Another variant of the joke starts with Zwickmi (= pinch ...



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