New answers tagged

3

The word probably stems from "Plattdeutsch", a dialect (or even an own language) spoken in Northern Germany. They know the word Spökenkieker — people who can tell the future (mostly bad events coming up) or see ghosts. "Spuk-Gucker" or "Geister-Seher" would be a direct translation. Sometimes people who tell scary stories also are called Spökenkieker. ...


15

According to the "Rheinisches Wörterbuch", Stöz means "rubbish". Rhinian dialect would fit into a Böll story, and rubbish would IMHO make sense in the quoted phrases. This interpretation is even better backed by another quote from Böll's "Gruppenbild mit Dame": Lotte war der gleichen Meinung wie ich, daß das alles Stuß, bzw. in meiner Ausdrucksweise ...


7

Actually, there is no such thing as a defined mapping between European Common Language Levels and such expressions typically used in job adverts. The levels distinguish between active and passive control of the language as well as reading/writing and conversational skills, this is not normally expressed in job adverts - The following mapping is mine and ...


4

The direct translation would be "style peculiarities," and it's a noun (in the plural), not an adjective. I'm not fully certain which english wording would be most appropriate, maybe "peculiarities of style"? It just occurred to me why you were guessing there's an adjective: German words with -keit or -heit are built from an adjective root and this suffix ...


5

In short, no, Weltschmerz is not untranslatable, but it’s often rather hard to translate well into English. The real question is either whether there are any words or phrases in any language that are untranslatable or whether there are words in a particular language (e.g. German Weltschmerz) that have no direct translation or cognate in a certain other ...



Top 50 recent answers are included