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I felt challenged by your postscript and did a little research (with Google, of course). I found this thesis (in German): http://www.bcs.rochester.edu/people/fjaeger/papers/ma-thesis-letter.pdf In 3.12.1 it briefly discusses the construction in your question. More interestingly (at least to me): the following sections and 3.9 list a couple of similar ...


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As mentioned before, "weg" and "Weg" are pronounced differently: Weg, noun, [veːk] weg, adverb, [vɛk] Nonetheless, both words share a common etymology. The reason for the difference in pronunciation is the following: In Middle High German, "weg/wec" [vɛk] had a short vowel and was used both for the adverb and the noun. When declining the noun, ...


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Upper-/Lowercase is not the only difference between the two, they also differ in pronounciation: "weg" has a short E, whereas "Weg" is spoken with a long vowel.


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In written language, yes, unless you start your sentence with "weg" as in Weg mit dir! But in spoken language, the "e" in "Weg" is longer. In terms of phonetics: Weg, [veːk], close-mid, frontal, unrounded vowel weg, [vɛk], open-mid, frontal, unrounded vowel The comparative "lighter" was attributed to the e in Weg by Emmanuel. [e] is technically ...



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