Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The word "man" is the subject of the sentence. "Man" is the one who writes, and besides the verb itself this is actually the one thing you cannot omit in that sentence. The closest English equivalent to "man" is "one", more idiomatic options are "you" and "people", depending on context.


2

As the others have already said: "vor" is temporal here, which means it takes the dative. Look at your sentence again. The motion expressed in it is not towards the "Anmeldung" but towards/into "Beratung". So "vor" obviously isn't involved in the motion - it belongs to the phrase telling you when to perform this motion: "vor der Anmeldung". Incidentally, ...


2

"Vor" is temporal here: Please go to the consultancy in X before signing up.


1

Simple, non-derived words have to be learned together with their inherent gender. They often have just one syllable or a complex one followed by a weak schwa syllable (or syllabic sonorant) and occur quite frequently. Derivation rules The rightmost part of a compound always determines its gender and its noun class (for inflection). This rightmost part may ...


0

The verb springen requires the dative case and, as Mädchen is neuter, the pronoun ihm is used. Had the young lady been referred to as Frau then the pronoun ihr would have been appropriate.


1

You can make the construction more understandable if you make two sentences: Ali hat einen Beruf und dieser Beruf gefällt ihm gut. If we now reduce the second sentence to a subclause we substitute the "dieser" for "der", and reorder the rest a bit: Ali hat einen Beruf, der ihm gut gefällt.


3

No they're not. They take their case according to the function they have (or the preposition they're preceded by) in the sub-clause. That is natural because cases express function in relation to a an activity or verb. A relative clause has a different verb than the main sentence.


2

Whoever writes "Anfrage nach" does not know German well. This happens with Germans, too, of course, in the same way that Americans also make mistakes in English. Correct versions would be "Anfrage wegen +Genitiv", "Anfrage zu +Dativ" or - best and most formal - "Anfrage bezüglich +Genitiv". The word "Anfrage" is formal anyway (usually used in written German ...


3

The construction is "etwas (Nom) gefällt jemandem (Dat)". So the person who likes something is in the dative case, while the thing that is liked is in the nominative case. * *This is different from English "like", where the person is the subject, and the thing the object. You'll often have expressions that have similar meaning in two languages, but ...


1

The "ihm" emphasizes that it's the girl whose fingers the blood comes out of. Or put more generally, that it's the girl to whom something happened. It would be understandable without the Dative but having it there is a general German fashion Ich habe das Buch gelesen, dass ich mir gekauft habe. Der Dieb hat mir mein Handy geklaut. The "mir" ...


2

Ihm (personal pronoun, not possesive) means that it happened to the girl. Here's a similar example: Das Blut sprang aus den Fingern. (Blood spilled from the fingers.) Das Blut sprang ihr aus den Fingern. (To her it happened that blood spilled from the fingers.) Not using the personal pronoun in the original sentence, leaves it technically undefined ...


2

In Duden – Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007 findet man die folgende Aussage: Anfrage wird in der Regel mit der Präposition wegen verbunden: Ihre Anfrage wegen des Termins haben wir erhalten. In der Amts- und Kaufmannssprache wird auch mit der Präposition bezüglich angeschlossen: Ihre Anfrage bezüglich der Lieferungen beantworten wir ...


3

Since it's Frage nach one would think that it would be Anfrage nach, but I have to agree with the article. Can't tell you if it's completely incorrect, since historically, it wouldn't have been used this way in the first place. (It would have been something like anfragen bei jemandem + relative clause) Personally, I wouldn't recommend nach, because ...


1

Hat es nicht etwas damit zu tun, dass sich das "Das" auf das Bier bezieht. Es ist "Das König Bier der Biere." Bier is sächlich, und damit hat es den Artikel "Das". Oder versteh' ich das komplett falsch?


-1

This sentence seems to be spoken German and in spoken German you don't analyse whether the subject is the same or not. As "um zu + infinitive" and "damit" both express purpose in spoken language can occur "damit" where the speaker would use "um zu" when he would write the sentence. In spoken language not all rules you can find in DAF textbooks are strictly ...


2

I think the rule is more like "if the subjects are different, you can't use 'um ... zu', and you must use 'damit'". I can come up with multiple examples where the subjects are the same, and one could use either "damit" or "um ... zu". In your example, "damit" is more natural. It emphasizes that it's a goal, and not a more or less natural consequence.


3

"bis"(zeitlich) + perfect tense is quite normal in sentences such as: Es wird wohl noch einige Zeit dauern bis wir die Arbeit erledigt haben. It is clear from the future tense at the beginning of the sentence that this sentence refers to something in future time. If someone would use future perfect at the end he would imitate Latin use of future ...


3

Depending on which time reference model you prefer, the different tenses have slightly different meanings. According to Reichenbach (1947) one of the prototypical meaning of future perfect (anterior future) can be represented as this: S-E-R whereas S = point of speach, E = event, R = point of reference In other words: Someone's talking about an future ...


4

According to Duden Volume 4 – Die Grammatik, the Futur II (future perfect) may be replaced by the Perfekt (perfect) if the reference to the future is established by some expression of time or similar: Sie rechnen aus, wie viel heute jede Minute über die Brücke gehen und wie viel in zehn Jahren über die Brücke gegangen sein werden (Böll). Auch möglich: ...


-1

The phrase is correct, I think. My English isn’t the best, so I’ll answer in German: Der Satz sagt aus, dass in der Zukunft dieser dann vergangene Fall eintreffen wird. In der Zukunft ist der Tathergang dann rekonstriert, beziehungsweise das Perfekt dann berechtigt, da die Handlung vergangen ist.


-1

Actually your second alternative is more correct than the newspaper: (b) ..., bis sie den Hergang der Ereignisse am Montagabend rekonstruiert haben wird. Even the newspapers are not perfect. :)


-1

I translated it on the fly and arrived at: It will take a while till the Celler police inspection will have reconstructed the happenings from Monday morning. I am not sure if it will fit perfectly. Also I can't answer the why. It comes to the writer how he would like to say it, sometimes. It is like it should say: It will take time till the ...


1

The relative pronouns gets the case from the function the entity has in the relative sentence. In this case it is subject because it is the students that study.Case configuration in the main sentence has absolutely no influence on it at all because it is a different verb.


0

The sentence in the newspaper sounds more smooth than the alternative, which requires the word "aber". The contrast between what is described in the two subclauses is automatic.


1

Mit der besonderen Wortstellung in "Waren es zunächst nur..." weiß man sofort, dass ein gegensätzlicher Satz folgt. Das Gleiche kann man auch mit einer Nebensatzeinleitung machen, aber ohne Konjunktion und mit Inversion ist der Satz schneller/kürzer. Ein stilistisches Mittel der Satzverkürzung.


0

In the written language the bolded sentence by Frankfurter Allgemeine is correct. But it's only used in the written language, no German would ever talk like this. But it is typical for a text where something is reported to the reader. Beginning the sentence with Es waren zunächst kaum … is a bad writing style because the previous sentence already ...


8

The German Wikipedia article on Verberststellung (that is positioning of the verb before the subject) gives three examples for this syntactical order in subordinate clauses: Konditionalsatz: Hätte ich mehr Zeit gehabt, hätte ich einen kürzeren Brief geschrieben. (Alternativ: Wenn ich mehr Zeit gehabt hätte, hätte ich...) Konzessivsatz: War der Auftritt ...


0

Interesting question. Being a native German speaker I don't realize that this is even worth raising a question. Both is correct, of course. I'd say it's just a matter of style. It sounds more fluent to me within the given context. With „Es war“ at the beginning of the previous sentence a repetition by „Es waren“ is avoided. Additionally, with "Es waren" at ...


4

The adjective überdrüssig is used with the genitive or (alternatively and less common) with the accusative to express that someone is weary of or fed up with something. Why the genitive? Well, that's just the way it is... In the sentence you quote überdrüssig is used as a noun: "die Überdrüssigen" = "die überdrüssigen Menschen". So alle des Staates ...


3

überdrüssig can be used with Genitive or Dative, but it will have different meanings: Ich bin des Freundes überdrüssig. (I'm fed up with the friend) Ich bin dem Freunde überdrüssig. (The friend is fed up with me) http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/ueberdruessig


3

Die einen is the plural form of one - literally the ones. However, here it's translatable as some (as in some of the people). As far as I know, die einen is always used in conjunction with die anderen to contrast one group of people (or things) with another. Here it's contrasting one group of DDR-Bürger (those who escaped) with another (those who took part ...


1

To think of "die einen / anderen" as "die eine / andere Gruppe von DDR-Bürgern" is semantically correct. To justify it grammatically: Both einen and anderen are pronouns here, i.e. they appear in place of a noun, namely Bürger. Bürger is plural, hence both pronouns are used in their plural form. As a pair they are used (I'd say idiomaticly) to contrast two ...


0

The sentence contains two determinative pronouns ( a combination of demonstrative and relative pronoun): 1 das, was schiefgeht 2 das, was klappt. And you have to maintain these pronouns even if you change the case. Your use of daraus+was is not idiomatic and woraus+was is wrong.


2

The problem is that "was" refers to "dem". It would be no problem to use "daraus" if you replace "was": Man lernt mehr draus, wenn etwas schiefgeht, als daraus, wenn etwas klappt. To use "woraus" seems impossible to me. According to Duden, "woraus" is used when questioning what something is made of: "Woraus ist das gemacht? Seide" Or if ...


0

Einerseits gibt es in Südamerika viele Menschen, die recyceln und dadurch weniger Müll produzieren . Andererseits gibt es Leute, die einfach nicht recyceln.


3

Let's consider the two possibilities: (1) Hätten die Kommunisten die Versorgung gekappt, die Sache wäre entschieden gewesen. (2) Hätten die Kommunisten die Versorgung gekappt, wäre die Sache entschieden gewesen. There is no doubt that version (2) is a correct sentence consisting of a main clause followed by a subordinate clause. Personally, I would ...


-1

Actually both is correct. But the sentence Der Spiegel used is the same like und die Sache wäre entschieden gewesen But you can leave the und away. Might just be easier to understand with und. Also their example is commonly used as kind of conclusion, a consequence. Hope I could help


1

Einerseits gibt es in Südamerika viele Menschen, die "recyceln" und ihren Müll weniger macht. Andererseits gibt es Leute, die einfach nicht "recycelt". It's nearly correct. I, as a German, would link the phrases so there would only be one, but your sentences are perfectly fine. The quotation marks aren't neccessary and would probably confuse a bit. ...


-1

Die Freiheit des einzelnen, seine Traumwelt mit individueller Besonderheit auszustatten und deren Verständnis anderen unzugänglich zu machen.


2

I can only speculate about the origin of this grammatical feature but als dass is used if the als is comparitive (than) while only als is used if the als is temporal (when). Some examples: Er stand lieber früh auf, als dass er arbeitslos war. He rather got up early than being unemployed (e.g., because he got a job that required him getting up early). ...


4

Correct me if my perception of the English sentence is wrong, but I think that She was born in Kansas with her parents being born in Washington. does not carry any extra meaning over She was born in Kansas, her parents were born in Washington. and that the former is only chosen because it seems more fluid. If so then I would not choose any of ...


4

I can't think of an idiomatic translation that doesn't need an extra (subordinate) sentence. So I suppose you rephrase the parts in italics giving rise to a German translation using a (subordinate) sentence: Sie ist/wurde in Kansas geboren, wobei ihre Eltern in Washington geboren wurden/sind. Sie ist/wurde in Kansas geboren. Dabei wurden/sind ihre ...


1

The sentence is a good example of how we can introduce several levels of uncertainty in a statement. The doctor who wrote this managed to include 5 of them: Es ist eine Osteonekrose. Es ist eventuell eine Osteonekrose. Eine Osteonekrose kommt eventuell in Betracht. Auch eine Osteonekrose kommt eventuell in Betracht. Auch eine ...


2

There is nothing in this sentence that requires the use of the subjunctive. Kommt auch eine Osteonekrose in Betracht? is a correct sentence with the same meaning. However, since the question implicitly suggests that whoever is asked has overlooked or wrongly excluded the possibility of an osteonecrosis, I would often use a Konjunktiv II of politeness ...


2

As rogermue correctly pointed out, Konjunktiv II is used to express a possibility. The fragment presented in the question is either a question or part of a statement. (It is not a stand-alone statement because the verb needs to be in the second place of the sentence in a statement.) Question: Käme eventuell auch eine Osteonekrose in Betracht? ...


-1

By "käme in Betracht" (past subjunctive) a remote possibility is expressed, meaning "something might be possible".


5

Take the same sentences without selbst. First sentence: "He is proud of himself". Second sentence: "He is proud of him." sich → himself ihn → him (someone else than the subject) Add selbst again. The confusing part is the similarity between ihn selbst and himself, which are not the same. For reflexivity, as can be seen from above, ...


4

Im Deutschen werden i.d.R. neben dem „Satzanfang“ nur die Kerne von Nominalphrasen (NP) groß geschrieben. Das ist eine syntaktische oder grammatische Wortart oder Rolle, die überwiegend als notwendige Ergänzung von Verben (vgl. Rektion) vorkommt (vulgo Subjekt und Objekte). Es gibt eine lexikalische Wortart, nämlich die Substantive, die syntaktisch praktisch ...


8

Adjektive werden groß geschrieben, wenn diese Als Substantive (Nomen) gebraucht werden. Hier noch ein paar Beispiele zur Großschreibung: Heute gehen die Alten zur Kirche. Der Älteste heiratet bald. Sie ist wirklich die Schönste. Bezieht sich das Adjektiv auf ein vorheriges/nachstehendes Substantiv, dann wird dieses klein geschrieben. Hier ...


0

Die Beispiele für die Großschreibung würden mich interessieren. Das aktuelle Beispiel ist jedenfalls keins dem ich die Großschreibung zuschreiben kann. Adjektive werden nicht groß geschrieben, es sei denn sie sind Teil eines Eigennamens. Sei also "Das Große Buch" ein anerkanntes Synonym für die Bibel (was es nicht ist) dann wäre das in Ordnung, ansonsten ...



Top 50 recent answers are included