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7

Congratulations, you have stumbled upon an idiomatic expression. Check the Duden page for Weg to find a mention of it under Wendungen, Redensarten, Sprichwörter. Seines Weges gehen is a fixed expression meaning to physically walk along one’s ways. It should not be confused with seinen Weg gehen which can also be used in the metaphoric sense of sticking to ...


6

A measure of two pound of green peas would be (nominative, with preposition) … zwei Pfund von grünen Erbsen … The alternative form in replacing the preposition with a genitive of measure would be … zwei Pfund grüner Erbsen … and the colloquial, everyday form which is most commonly used today would be (all nominative, no preposition) … zwei ...


5

Adding an adjective to the noun makes it clearer: Der Saal war voll grüner Menschen. So we know it is genitive plural. It is even clearer if we use a noun whose genitive and dative plural forms are distinct: Der Saal war voll kleiner Kinder. So it is definitely genitive plural.


5

Formal writing seems decisively in favour of trotz + genitive, as it has been since the mid-19th century. The larger dynamic here is that the use of SMS and the like have democratised writing a bit, therefore dialect (for example Swiss) and vernacular elements generally are being written a bit more. But that is different than any shift in what is printed ...


5

In both your examples it is not so much the verb, that rules the case, but rather the preposition. "in" goes with both dative and accusative - Dative is used for static past movement - Something has been moved somewhere and now stays there. Ich trage die Daten in der Tabelle ein Focuses more on the data now being in the table. Accusative is used to ...


5

This is a mix of two constructs that might be a bit hard to get for learners of the language - A construct using dative to express "I accept" (maybe close to the English "Fits/suits me"), and the whole thing in subjunctive. Aunt Petunia said "It won't ever enter the house" Tante Petunia sagte, "Das kommt mir nicht ins Haus" (So basically an expression ...


5

Einparken is the process of actually driving your car into the parking space (ausparken would be the opposite). For example: Ich muss mich konzentrieren während ich einparke! Mein Sohn fährt ganz gut Auto, nur Einparken muss er noch üben. Parken can be the process of parking your car (not just the process of driving it into the parking space, but ...


4

Whatever the intended difference is, it is not a semantic one. You've already named two different alternative motives for varying the form: variation (exact repetitions are dispreferred because they might be mistaken for accidental duplication) and rhythm ("Im Herbste zechten wir als Weise" alternates stressed and unstressed syllables, while "Im Herbst ...


3

Der grammatische Fall wird vom Verb bestimmt, und dieses fallbestimmende Verb ist »wollen«. Jenes Argument von wollen, welches beinhaltet was gewollt wird (Das Ziel des Wollens) muss im Akkusativ stehen: Er will dich. Hans wollte den Ball. Der König wird dein Land wollen. Anstelle des Akkusativobjekts kann auch ein Verb im Infinit stehen. In ...


2

Canoo.net sums it up nicely. The general rule is: Use genitive. Then the following exceptions apply: Since genitive plural is unmarked, always use dative plural if there is no article and there are no adjectives; Always use (uninflected) dative singular for single nouns without adjectives or article; You may use dative if the noun has no article, only ...


2

First recommendation: look into the dictionary, see this question. In many cases pronounciation already gives a hint: trying to pronounce "Arzts" without getting a knot in ones tongue gives an indication, why the e is useful here. In composite substantives the composition has the same genitive ending.


2

Both are grammatically acceptable, and both can be used interchangeably. In the prepositional form, the preposition rules the case - "von" wants dative case, so "Menschen" is dative plural. In the form without a preposition, the case is genitive (Finding out is not exactly easy, but works best if you try and add an adjective to the substantive, like) ...


1

I would also parse the sentence in the way you outlined along and around question one. I also think that it mirrors the French original well. However, please pardon my French, it is not as good as my German or my English. I also feel that using the genitive for the colours, and thereby putting them in apposition to the word colours, i.e. have them be a ...



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