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7

In standard German, "ich möchte..." requires an accusative object: Ich möchte einen Kaffee. However, the "-en" of "einen" is not always pronounced with a proper vowel. Sometimes you just hear a long n [aɪ̯n:] or a normal n followed by a syllabic n [aɪ̯nn̩] If an order is placed without "ich möchte..." you cannot determine the required case. So both ...


6

You are looking for relative clauses that begin with a preposition. As a first step you must know which case the preposition in question requires. Then you take the relative pronoun of the correct gender, number and case. Take for example the sentence Ich habe den Teller verloren, von ??? ich essen wollte! As you can see in any dictionary of your ...


4

I would never say "Ein Kaffee bitte", but always "(Ich möchte) Einen Kaffee bitte". But in spoken language that may sound as "ein'n Kaffee" and learners haven't yet got the ear to hear the slurred ending -en. Chris called it a "long n"- good expression - I would call it a syllabic n, just as l in "to settle" is pronounced as a syllable and spoken a bit ...


3

Duden – Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007: Steht ein Titel oder eine Berufsbezeichnung ohne Artikel oder Pronomen vor einem Eigennamen, dann wird nur der Name flektiert (…): Staatsanwältin Schneiders Sondervotum, die Ansprache Papst Benedikts XVI., der Weggang Rektor Meyers, die Günstlinge Königin Christines von Schweden, der Sieg ...


3

First, I strongly advise you not to equate "accusative" with "direct object" nor "dative" with "indirect object". These terms are not equivalent and mixing them up may lead you to some problems (note in the end). In your examples, "dative" makes the location be the place where someone is and "accusative" makes the location be the destination where someone ...


2

The position of "nicht" (in the second example) is correct. However, the third example sentence is grammatically incorrect. It should read: Ich habe es dir nicht sagen mögen.


1

What I am about to say is not a scientific account based on data, but only meant as some rules that I can remember I use when formulating and interpreting relative clauses. Other people may use other rules and I do not have empirical data to claim that what I do is what most people do. After this warning, here is what I do. First of all, it seems quite ...


1

Where-indications in German are made with prepositions + dative (indirect object). Die Zeitung liegt auf dem Tisch in der Küche. Die Katze liegt unter dem Sofa. Der alte Mann saß auf einer Bank vor dem Haus. Vor dem Haus ist ein Garten. Hinter dem Haus ist ein Wald. Die Lampe hängt über dem Tisch. Where-to-indications are made with prepositions + ...


1

For me, more interesting than relics of ancient cases is the creation of new cases. It seems to me that "zu mir [destination]" as in "zu mir nach Hause" (to my place), "zu mir ins Bett" (to my bed), "zu mir ins Hotel" (to my hotel), "zu mir ins Büro" (to my office), "zu mir ins Heimat" (to my hometown) and so on is a very productive pattern to mention a ...



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