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1

Just a small addendum: The phrase "Der Dativ ist dem Genitiv sein Tod" has become very popular again within the last years. One of the more popular ambassador of this oppinion is a journalist called Bastian Sick, who writes his columns entitled "Zwiebelfisch", published on the german magazine Spiegel. The phrase itself is kind of a wordplay as it ...


0

Eine einfache Übersetzung (simple translation): (a) The chicken is producing an egg while being on the floor. (b) The chicken is putting an egg on the floor. B sounds a little weird indeed. But they are definitely both correct german.


0

I consider both as correct, and I'd recommend the usage of one or the other depending on what you want to emphasize, and where you want to guide your audience mentally to prepare for what's coming next. If you want to focus your audience on the location where the egg can be found, you'd prefer (b), focusing your audience on the further fate of the egg, if ...


6

Vorweg: Bei möchten handelt es sich nicht um ein eigenständiges Verb, sondern formal um eine Konjunktiv-II-Form von mögen. Deshalb gibt es (noch) keinen Infinitiv möchten. Zu deiner Frage: Wenn du ich möchte mit einem Objekt verwenden willst, dann wird dieses Objekt im Akkusativ gebraucht: Ich möchte einen Hamburger. Ich möchte eine Pizza. Ich möchte ein ...


4

"Möchten" as a full verb governs accusative and cannot take an indirect object. As it is a modal verb it can be combined with other verbs that might require Dative. This dative object often comes right after the conjugated form of "möchten" but it is not linked to it at all. This is why you cannot compare the search results directly. Ich möchte einen ...


1

"Möchten" als ein "normales" Verb benötigt ein direktes / Akkusativ-Objekt: Ich möchte einen Kaffee. (Wobei "möchten" streng genommen nur ein Konjunktiv von "mögen" ist, siehe Does the verb "möchten" exist?) "Möchten" kann aber auch als ein modales Verb gebraucht werden. In diesem Fall richtet sich der Kasus der Objekte wie bei allen ...


3

Both are unrealistic and with this I'm seconding j0hj0h: „Both sound strange at first to me.“. I've never seen a hale authentic hen laying an egg on or onto the (bare) ground. (I agree I've never seen a chicken farm from inside but the animals there are neither hale nor authentic anyway.) Maybe that's why „legt ein Ei auf den Boden“ sounds even stranger ...


9

It depends on the context. Both sound strange at first to me. If you are talking about a chicken that is sitting on the ground and then you want to express that it lays an egg, you would say "Das Huhn legt ein Ei auf dem Boden". That way it feels as if you would say "Das Huhn ist auf dem Boden und legt ein Ei". If you want to state that the chicken is ...


-2

auf dem Boden (dative) is a where-indication. auf den Boden (accusative) is a where-to-indication. So only (b) is correct. German distinguishes strictly between where and where to. There are languages that don't make this distinction.


2

The position of "nicht" (in the second example) is correct. However, the third example sentence is grammatically incorrect. It should read: Ich habe es dir nicht sagen mögen.


4

According to Duden (Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007): In case an academic or occupational title is used without a pronoun or article then only the name will be inflected.


0

In my opinion there is a subtle difference between "Ein Brief an (den) Ministerpräsidenten Netanjahu" and "Ein Brief an Ministerpräsident Natanjahu" The first emphasizes that the letter is for the prime minister (which happens to have the name Netanjahu) while the second emphasizes that the letter is for Netanjahu (which happens to be prime minister). ...


0

You are right: In normal German the phrase should be Brief an Ministerpräsidenten. However, in newspaper headlines you often find that -en-endings are omitted to avoid any confusion with plural forms. So Brief an Ministerpräsidenten could be (mis)understood as letter to prime ministers. This interpretation can be avoided by writing Brief an ...



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