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2

Both are unrealistic and with this I'm seconding j0hj0h: „Both sound strange at first to me.“. I've never seen a hale authentic hen laying an egg on or onto the (bare) ground. (I agree I've never seen a chicken farm from inside but the animals there are neither hale nor authentic anyway.) Maybe that's why „legt ein Ei auf den Boden“ sounds even stranger ...


6

It depends on the context. Both sound strange at first to me. If you are talking about a chicken that is sitting on the ground and then you want to express that it lays an egg, you would say "Das Huhn legt ein Ei auf dem Boden". That way it feels as if you would say "Das Huhn ist auf dem Boden und legt ein Ei". If you want to state that the chicken is ...


-1

auf dem Boden (dative) is a where-indication. auf den Boden (accusative) is a where-to-indication. So only (b) is correct. German distinguishes strictly between where and where to. There are languages that don't make this distinction.


2

The position of "nicht" (in the second example) is correct. However, the third example sentence is grammatically incorrect. It should read: Ich habe es dir nicht sagen mögen.


4

According to Duden (Richtiges und gutes Deutsch, 6. Aufl. Mannheim 2007): In case an academic or occupational title is used without a pronoun or article then only the name will be inflected.


0

In my opinion there is a subtle difference between "Ein Brief an (den) Ministerpräsidenten Netanjahu" and "Ein Brief an Ministerpräsident Natanjahu" The first emphasizes that the letter is for the prime minister (which happens to have the name Netanjahu) while the second emphasizes that the letter is for Netanjahu (which happens to be prime minister). ...


0

You are right: In normal German the phrase should be Brief an Ministerpräsidenten. However, in newspaper headlines you often find that -en-endings are omitted to avoid any confusion with plural forms. So Brief an Ministerpräsidenten could be (mis)understood as letter to prime ministers. This interpretation can be avoided by writing Brief an ...


6

You are looking for relative clauses that begin with a preposition. As a first step you must know which case the preposition in question requires. Then you take the relative pronoun of the correct gender, number and case. Take for example the sentence Ich habe den Teller verloren, von ??? ich essen wollte! As you can see in any dictionary of your ...


1

What I am about to say is not a scientific account based on data, but only meant as some rules that I can remember I use when formulating and interpreting relative clauses. Other people may use other rules and I do not have empirical data to claim that what I do is what most people do. After this warning, here is what I do. First of all, it seems quite ...


0

Roughly like you have it: "Ich habe den Teller verloren, von dem..." "Er ist zu jenem Schwimmbad zurückgegangen, in dessen Nähe..." (oder "wo er in der Nähe...") "Hier sind die Kinder, mit denen er..." You can also say something like this: "Ich habe die Hose verloren, die Du mir geschenkt hast, und in deren Tasche das Geld war, das ich mir geliehen ...


1

Where-indications in German are made with prepositions + dative (indirect object). Die Zeitung liegt auf dem Tisch in der Küche. Die Katze liegt unter dem Sofa. Der alte Mann saß auf einer Bank vor dem Haus. Vor dem Haus ist ein Garten. Hinter dem Haus ist ein Wald. Die Lampe hängt über dem Tisch. Where-to-indications are made with prepositions + ...


1

For me, more interesting than relics of ancient cases is the creation of new cases. It seems to me that "zu mir [destination]" as in "zu mir nach Hause" (to my place), "zu mir ins Bett" (to my bed), "zu mir ins Hotel" (to my hotel), "zu mir ins Büro" (to my office), "zu mir ins Heimat" (to my hometown) and so on is a very productive pattern to mention a ...


3

First, I strongly advise you not to equate "accusative" with "direct object" nor "dative" with "indirect object". These terms are not equivalent and mixing them up may lead you to some problems (note in the end). In your examples, "dative" makes the location be the place where someone is and "accusative" makes the location be the destination where someone ...



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