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17

Der Infinitiv ist eine grammatikalisch erlaubte Ersatzform des Imperativs. Ich würde auch nicht von Umgangssprache reden. Dabei ist der Infinitiv nicht die einzige Ersatzform. Z. B. gibt es: Infinitiv ("Zimmer aufräumen!") Nomen ("Hilfe!") Partizip ("Stillgestanden!") Passiv ("Jetzt wird gegessen!") Indikativ ("Du gehst jetzt!") Futur ("Du wirst das Haus ...


8

I'm assuming, you're having for example a phone call with your step-father at the end of which you might say: "Bye! And, oh, don't drop the soap!" In this case in my opinion the correct version would be: Lass nicht die Seife fallen! As you can see in the comments, there are a lot of ways to add or remove shades of meaning by changing the word order ...


8

Was die Bedeutung der beiden Varianten beim Imperativ Singular betrifft, gibt es zwischen den beiden Formen keinen Unterschied. Im Sprachgebrauch ist die Endung -e meistens fakultativ: geh! und gehe! oder ruf! und rufe! sind gleichwertige Parallelformen. Bei schwachen Verben, deren Wortstamm auf -t oder -d endet, gilt die Form mit -e als stilistisch ...


8

Sometimes instead of using the imperative, the infinitive is used. I think this is so it's more general and not as much like "hey you, do X." Like on a train you might hear Bitte alle aussteigen! (Instead of bitte steige aus/steigen Sie aus/steigt aus) or if you're on the Autobahn and part is about to repaired and is in bad shape now, there could be a ...


7

Lass uns uns treffen. is correct. As Hauser pointed out, it is not good style, though. You can easily see, that it is correct if you replace the Akkusativ object: Lass uns Martin treffen. You cannot omit the Akkusativ object, so you cannot drop the second "uns". In this case (for the "better" style) I would use: Treffen wir uns. ...


6

Tja, vor einigen Jahrzehnten hätte man schlichtweg gesagt: Das ist falsch. (Denn starke Verben, die in der 2./3. Person Singular einen Vokalwechsel zu i haben, bilden auch den Imperativ Singular mit diesem i, und ohne Endung.) Vermutlich werden Deutschlehrer und Korrektoren das auch immer noch so sehen. In der alltäglichen Sprache allerdings ist diese ...


6

There is a tendency of speakers of German to forget using the “irregular” imperatives, i.e., that of strong verbs with e as a stem vowel (geben, helfen, werfen, …)¹. Instead they form the imperative, as if these verbs were regular. For example, instead of using gib as an imperative of geben, they use geb(e) (compare to the weak verb leben, whose correct ...


5

I don't like the doubled uns (matter of personal style), I would rather use a rhetorical question Wollen wir uns nicht treffen(?) It matches -imho- the meaning of "Lasst uns" in colloquial German, which basically is a question/request, as the other persons still have to agree with your suggestion. Wollen wir uns treffen? Would be a real ...


4

Why, the imperative of course.


4

Yes, in principle, "Bewahren Sie..." is possible. The other construction (without "Sie") is called an "Ersatzform des Imperativs" (i.e. a replacement form of the imperative) using an infinitive construction. First of all, this is perfectly good German. Moreover, it often shortens the sentences (see the examples of thekeyofgb or your own favourite examples), ...


4

Basically, you got it. You can say Wähl du! as well as Du wählst aus! to leave it to someone's discretion what you take. Nevertheless, there's a significant difference between Wähl! and Wähl du!. The first one will likely be said by someone who is in charge. You can see this more clearly in your second example, i.e. Mach! Boss: Lösch die Dateien! You: ...


4

Zur Stellung von "nicht" als nicht-kontrastierende Verneinung finden wir folgene Regel: Wenn nicht als nicht kontrastierende, pauschale Verneinung verwendet wird, hat es die Tendenz weit hinten im Satz zu stehen.Canoo Diese Regel wird im aufgeführten Beispiel eingehalten: Vergiss den Reisepass nicht. Stellt man das nicht vor den Reisepass so ...


4

Beide sind korrekt - mit dem Unterschied, dass im ersten Fall die Betonung ein wenig mehr auf dem Gegenstand liegt, der nicht vergessen werden soll; es ist aber wirklich nur eine Akzentverschiebung.


3

Putting things outside of the verbal bracket is called Ausklammerung. A final verbal element can be a separable prefix, infinitive, or participle in main clause statements, questions and commands and in subordinate clauses it's the finite verb. Ich will nicht mitmachen - here will and mitmachen for brackets around most of the sentence Ich nehme an, ...


3

Splattne has already provided an excellent answer, so let me add some practical observations: This may be specific to Berlin lower classes, but some people use wrong regular imperatives when an irregular form would be correct: sehe! instead of the correct sieh! It seems to me that sometimes the form with -e is seen as stronger than the form without ...


2

You will find that things like that, and especially "Verbote" are often expressed in a non-personal way. This gives the whole thing an official note (i.e. "es ist amtlich"). The alternative is often not so good. Consider: Rauchen verboten! This is short and clear. Some authority (usually the state) has spoken. There is no doublt that you have to obey. ...


2

An alternative that might sometimes sound better is "Wir sollten...".


2

"Lass uns einander treffen" is both correct and good style (though might be viewed as overly sublime in day-to-day spoken language). "Lass uns uns treffen" is correct, but obviously not very good style. "Lass uns treffen" is often used informally, even though it is formally incorrect. EDIT: I'd like to point out that the "Lass uns..." wording is also a ...


2

John Smithers is right, you can use both, BUT, "Lass uns..." (addressing one person) or "Lasst uns..." (addressing a group of people) are not colloquial, at least in the southern half of Germany. Again John Smithers is right that the alternative from your book is not very common. The more I think about it, the more it seems to me that we either ...


2

Lass uns uns treffen is the correct one. "Lass uns" ist the correct (albeit literal) translation of "let's", "sich treffen" is reflexive and needs the reflexive pronoun. If that becomes "uns" for grammatical reasons as it happens here, and meets the "uns" in "Lass uns", then you need both instances of "uns". In reality you will probably also hear "Lass ...


2

I think it is correct, when you address a single other person. In case you address a group of people, better to say: Lasst uns uns treffen


1

You can use both. I would prefer in most (but not all) cases the construction with "lassen", but that's up to you. As far as I know none of these constructions is colloquial. First: No-one would say "Studieren wir jetzt". I guess they mean "Lernen wir jetzt". I would use "Lass uns lernen" because the other sentence sounds more like a question to me "Lernen ...



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