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7

Hier muss man m.E. zwischen der Verwendung des Konjunktiv im Hauptsatz und in indirekter Rede trennen. Bei dem Beispiel Er sagte, es gebe/gäbe eine Möglichkeit, das zu ändern. drückst Du erst einmal keine Wertung aus, sondern berichtest in indirekter Rede von der Aussage (und evtl. Bewertung) eines Dritten. Welche grammatische Ausprägung man hier ...


6

This is not a complete answer, but I'd like to point to this academic paper by Yukik Shioya (22 pages PDF download) about the expression of scepticism in German's indirect speech: The author confronts these sentences a. Maria hat gesagt: "Ich bin 18 Jahre alt." b. Maria hat gesagt, dass sie 18 Jahre alt ist. c. Maria hat gesagt, dass sie 18 Jahre ...


6

The first variant given by you, Ich sagte, ich sei müde. sounds a bit stilted but is technically correct. In spoken language, more typically you would say Ich sagte: "Ich bin müde". or some other variant such as Ich war müde und sagte das auch. By the way, back when IBM sold personal computers, can you guess how Germans would resolve the ...


4

The German appropriation is neither wäre nor sei as you suggested, but simply Ich hab dir gesagt, dass ich stolz auf dich bin. Indirect speech works with a different mechanism in English (Please, read about backshift of tenses to understand how it works in English). Ich bin, which is "I am" (Simple Present) in English, turns to "I was" (Simple Past) in ...


3

Welcome to GL&U! I hope you're enjoying your experience here. Basically the meanings are the same. What is different is the level of formality. Although the Konjunktiv I is indeed used for indirect speech (indirekte Rede), you will mostly come across it in things like news reports. It is a bit formal for normal conversational usage. So, between the ...


2

In non-colloquial speech the variant with sei is almost certainly what you want to use. The default mood for reported speech is the subjunctive I (here: sei) and using it does not indicate any uncertainty about the correctness of the reported information – and thus it does not make any difference that you are reporting your own speech (see also this ...


2

If you are looking for what a native speaker would say in an everyday conversation, use: Ich habe dir gesagt, dass ich stolz auf dich bin. It may not be absolutely correct, gramatically, but everything else would sound too formal, use it only in written language!


1

Meiner Meinung nach ist Er sagte, dass sie gesagt hätte, dass sie ihn nicht lieben würde richtig. Er sagte, dass sie gesagt hätte, dass sie ihn niemals geliebt haben würde funktioniert nicht als ganzer Satz, sondern müsste von einem wenn oder aber gefolgt werden: Er sagte, dass sie gesagt hätte, dass sie ihn niemals geliebt haben würde, ...


1

Basically, the "dass" can be considered a substitute for the "Konjunktiv" form. Without the "dass," you would need to use the Konjunktiv to show that you are not saying something directly, but rather conveying what SOMEONE ELSE had to say. Der Politiker sagte er sei super. In "legal" English, that is known as "hearsay." But "dass" conveys this ...


1

There are two things on which you have to pay attention. (I know that the examples weren't added by you, but there is a minor lack in correctness.) In spoken language Germans tend to use the "Perfekt" to express things that happened in the past and are finished. Der Politiker hat eine Rede gehalten. Now, it obviously that you will also use "Perfekt" ...


1

This is not a direct answer to your question but I think it's also good to know. I posted in my comment, that I'm not quite happy with the second sentence. It should be: Der Politiker sagte, er sei super. I found this wiki-entry. In all examples for Konjunktiv 1 the first part of the sentence is in this form: "Er berichtet", "Er berichtete". I would ...



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